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Over and Over (Bobby Day song)

“Over and Over” is a song written by Robert James Byrd and recorded by him using the stage name Bobby Day. Day’s version entered the Billboard Top 100 in 1958, the same week a version of the same song by Thurston Harris entered the chart. Day’s version reached #41, and was the B-side to Rockin’ Robin.[1] Thurston Harris’ version peaked at #96. In the song, the singer describes going to a party with misgivings of having a good time, until he sees a pretty girl. The singer attempts to ask her out, but she is waiting for her date to arrive. He vows to try “over and over”.

Turn! Turn! Turn!

“Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There Is a Season)” — often abbreviated to “Turn! Turn! Turn!” — is a song written by Pete Seeger in the late 1950s. The lyrics, except for the title which is repeated throughout the song and the final two lines, are adapted word-for-word from the English version of the first eight verses of the third chapter of the biblical Book of Ecclesiastes. The song was originally released in 1962 as “To Everything There Is a Season” on The Limeliters’ album Folk Matinee and then some months later on Seeger’s own The Bitter and the Sweet.[1]

The song became an international hit in late 1965 when it was covered by the American folk rock band The Byrds, entering at #80 on October 23, 1965, before reaching #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on December 4, 1965, #3 in Canada (Nov. 29, 1965), and also peaking at #26 on the UK Singles Chart. In the U.S., the song holds distinction as the #1 hit with the oldest lyrics.

I Hear a Symphony

“I Hear a Symphony” is a 1965 song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label.

Written and produced by Motown’s main production team, Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song became their sixth number-one pop hit on Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in the United States for two weeks from November 14, 1965 through November 27, 1965.[1][2] On the UK pop chart, the single peaked at number thirty-nine.

Get Off of My Cloud

“Get Off of My Cloud” is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones.[3] It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards as single to follow the successful “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”. Recorded in early September 1965 and released that November, the song topped the charts in the United Kingdom, the United States and Germany, reaching #2 in Australia and Ireland.

The Stones have said that the song is a reaction to their suddenly greatly enhanced popularity and deals with their aversion to people’s expectations of them after the success of “Satisfaction”. According to Keith Richards; “Get off of My Cloud” was basically a response to people knocking on our door asking us for the follow-up to “Satisfaction”… We thought ‘At last. We can sit back and maybe think about events’. Suddenly there’s the knock at the door and of course what came out of that was “Get off of My Cloud”.[4] In 1971 he commented; “I never dug it as a record. The chorus was a nice idea, but we rushed it as the follow-up. We were in L.A., and it was time for another single. But how do you follow-up “Satisfaction”? Actually, what I wanted was to do it slow like a Lee Dorsey thing. We rocked it up. I thought it was one of Andrew Loog Oldham’s worst productions.”[5]

In a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone, Jagger said, “That was Keith’s melody and my lyrics. … It’s a stop-bugging-me, post-teenage-alienation song. The grown-up world was a very ordered society in the early ’60s, and I was coming out of it. America was even more ordered than anywhere else. I found it was a very restrictive society in thought and behavior and dress.”[6]

“I was sick and tired, fed up with this and decided to take a drive downtown

It was so very quiet and peaceful, there was nobody, not a soul around

I laid myself out, I was so tired and I started to dream

In the morning the parking tickets were just like flags stuck on my windscreen”

The song is in E major and is built on variants of the “Louie Louie” riff, a short repeating pattern of the chords I, IV and V, in this case E–A–B–A. The arrangement is noted for its drum intro by Charlie Watts and twin guitars by Brian Jones and Keith Richards.[7] Brian Jones’ twelve-string guitar part can only just be heard in the mono mix of the song but can be clearly heard in some unofficial stereo remixes.

Yesterday (Beatles song)

“Yesterday” is a song by English rock band The Beatles written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney) first released on the album Help! in the United Kingdom in August 1965.

“Yesterday”, with the B-side “Act Naturally”, was released as a single in the United States in September 1965. While it topped the American chart in October the song also hit the British top 10 in a cover version by Matt Monro. The song also appeared on the UK EP “Yesterday” in March 1966 and the Beatles’ US album Yesterday and Today, released in June 1966.

McCartney’s vocal and acoustic guitar, together with a string quartet, essentially made for the first solo performance of the band. It remains popular today with more than 2,200 cover versions[2] and is one of the most covered songs in the history of recorded music.[note 1] “Yesterday” was voted the best song of the 20th century in a 1999 BBC Radio 2 poll of music experts and listeners and was also voted the No. 1 pop song of all time by MTV and Rolling Stone magazine the following year. In 1997, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone.[4]

“Yesterday” is a melancholy ballad about the break-up of a relationship. The singer laments for yesterday when he and his love were together, before she left because of something he said. McCartney is the only member of the Beatles to appear on the recording. The final recording was so different from other works by the Beatles that the band members vetoed the release of the song as a single in the United Kingdom, although other artists were quick to do so. It was issued as a single in the US in September 1965 and later released as a single in the UK in 1976.

Hang On Sloopy

“Hang On Sloopy” is a 1964 song by Wes Farrell and Bert Berns, originally titled “My Girl Sloopy”. It peaked at number 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100.

According to Rick Derringer, the original version of Sloopy was written by a “high school kid in St. Louis” and sold to Bert Russell, a.k.a. Bert Berns.[1] If true, the answer to the age old question “Just who is Sloopy?” lies with him. “My Girl Sloopy” was first recorded by L.A.-based The Vibrations in 1964, for Atlantic Records (45-2222), reaching #10 on the R&B chart and #26 on the US pop chart.[2] In April 1965[3] the song became a local hit in the Pacific Northwest in a cover version by James Henry & The Olympics (Jerden Records),[4] but it was quickly eclipsed in August when the Indiana pop group The McCoys released their iconic retitled version. “Hang On Sloopy” went to #1 in the United States in October 1965.[5]

Eve of Destruction (song)

“Eve of Destruction” is a protest song written by P. F. Sloan in mid-1964.[1] Several artists have recorded it, but the best-known recording was by Barry McGuire. This recording was made between July 12 and July 15, 1965 and released by Dunhill Records. The accompanying musicians were top-tier LA session players: P. F. Sloan on guitar, Hal Blaine (of Phil Spector’s “Wrecking Crew”) on drums, and Larry Knechtel on bass. The vocal track was thrown on as a rough mix and was not intended to be the final version, but a copy of the recording “leaked” out to a DJ, who began playing it.[2] The song was an instant hit and as a result the more polished vocal track that was at first envisioned was never recorded.

McGuire’s single hit #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and #3 on the UK Singles Chart in September 1965.

Help! (song)

“Help!” is a song by the Beatles that served as the title song for both the 1965 film and its soundtrack album. It was also released as a single, and was number one for three weeks in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

“Help!” was written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney. During an interview with Playboy in 1980, Lennon recounted: “The whole Beatles thing was just beyond comprehension. I was subconsciously crying out for help”.

I Got You Babe

“I Got You Babe” is a song written by Sonny Bono. It was the first single taken from the debut studio album Look at Us, of the American pop music duo Sonny & Cher. In August 1965, their single spent three weeks at number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States[1] where it sold more than 1 million copies and was certified Gold. It also reached number 1 in the United Kingdom and Canada. In 1985, a cover version of “I Got You Babe” by British reggae/pop band UB40 featuring American singer Chrissie Hynde, peaked at number one in the UK Singles Chart and reached number 28 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. A 1993 version by Cher with Beavis and Butt-Head bubbled under the Hot 100 chart.

I’m Henery the Eighth, I Am

“I’m Henery the Eighth, I Am” (also “I’m Henery the VIII, I Am” or “I’m Henry VIII, I Am”; spelled “Henery” but pronounced “‘Enery” in the Cockney style normally used to sing it) is a 1910 British music hall song by Fred Murray and R. P. Weston. It was a signature song of the music hall star Harry Champion. In 1965, it became the fastest-selling song in history to that point when it was revived by Herman’s Hermits,[1] becoming the group’s second number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The lead solo on the Hermits’ version was played by the group’s lead guitarist Derek “Lek” Leckenby.[2]

In the well-known chorus, Henery explains that his wife had been married seven times before:

I’m ‘Enery the Eighth, I am,

‘Enery the Eighth I am, I am!

I got married to the widow next door,

She’s been married seven times before

And every one was an ‘Enery

She wouldn’t have a Willie nor a Sam

I’m her eighth old man named ‘Enery

‘Enery the Eighth, I am!

(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

“(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones, released in 1965. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and produced by Andrew Loog Oldham. Richards’ three-note guitar riff‍—‌intended to be replaced by horns‍—‌opens and drives the song. The lyrics refer to sexual frustration and commercialism.

The song was first released as a single in the United States in June 1965 and was also featured on the American version of the Rolling Stones’ fourth studio album, Out of Our Heads, released that July. “Satisfaction” was a hit, giving the Stones their first number one in the US. In the UK, the song initially was played only on pirate radio stations, because its lyrics were considered too sexually suggestive.[3] It later became the Rolling Stones’ fourth number one in the United Kingdom.

In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine placed “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” in the second spot on its list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”. The song was added to the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress in 2006.

Mr. Tambourine Man

“Mr. Tambourine Man” is a song written, composed, and performed by Bob Dylan, who released his original version of it on his 1965 album Bringing It All Back Home. The Byrds also recorded a version of the song that they released in the same year as their first single on Columbia Records, reaching number 1 on both the Billboard Hot 100 chart and the UK Singles Chart, as well as being the title track of their first album, Mr. Tambourine Man. The Byrds’ recording of the song was influential in initiating the musical subgenre of folk rock, leading many contemporary bands to mimic its fusion of jangly guitars and intellectual lyrics in the wake of the single’s success.

This song has been performed and recorded by many artists, including Judy Collins, Odetta, Melanie, and William Shatner. The song’s popularity led to Dylan recording it live many times, and it has been included in multiple Dylan and Byrds compilation albums. It has been translated into other languages, and has been used or referenced in television shows, films and books.

The song has a bright, expansive melody and has become famous in particular for its surrealistic imagery, influenced by artists as diverse as French poet Arthur Rimbaud and Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini. The lyrics call on the title character to play a song and the narrator will follow. Interpretations of the lyrics have included a paean to drugs such as LSD, a call to the singer’s muse, a reflection of the audience’s demands on the singer, and religious interpretations. Dylan’s song has four verses, of which The Byrds only used the second for their recording. Dylan’s and The Byrds’ versions have appeared on various lists ranking the greatest songs of all time, including an appearance by both on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 best songs ever. Both versions also received Grammy Hall of Fame Awards.

I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch)

“I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch)” is a 1965 hit song recorded by the Four Tops for the Motown label.

Written and produced by Motown’s main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song is one of the most well-known Motown tunes of the 1960s. The song reached number one on the R&B charts and was also the number-one song on the Billboard Hot 100 for two non-consecutive weeks,[1] from June 12 to June 19 and from June 26 to July 3 in 1965. It replaced “Back in My Arms Again” by labelmates The Supremes, was first replaced by “Mr. Tambourine Man” by The Byrds, then regained the top spot before being replaced by “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” by The Rolling Stones. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 2 song of 1965.[2] It was also the Four Tops first Top 40 single in the UK, reaching #23.[3]

The song finds lead singer Levi Stubbs, assisted by the other three Tops and The Andantes, pleadingly professing his love to a woman: “Sugar pie, honey bunch/I’m weaker than a man should be!/Can’t help myself/I’m a fool in love, you see.” Like most of his lead parts, Stubbs’ vocals are recorded in a tone that straddles the line between singing and shouting, similar to the tone of a black Baptist preacher. The melodic and chordal progressions are very similar to the Supremes’ “Where Did Our Love Go”. Allmusic critic Ed Hogan claims that the song uses the same chords as The Supremes’ 1964 hit “Where Did Our Love Go,” also written by Holland-Dozier-Holland.[4]

Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song #415 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It has been covered extensively since 1965, including versions done for several television commercials.

Back in My Arms Again

“Back in My Arms Again” is a 1965 song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label.

Written and produced by Motown’s main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, “Back in My Arms Again” was the fifth consecutive and overall number-one song for the group on the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in the United States from June 6, 1965 through June 12, 1965,[1] also topping the soul chart for a week.

Help Me, Rhonda

“Help Me, Rhonda” (originally published as “Help Me, Ronda”) is a song written and composed by Brian Wilson with additional lyrics by Mike Love for American rock band the Beach Boys.[1] It was first released as “Help Me, Ronda” in March 1965 on the album The Beach Boys Today!. A second recording, with a significantly different arrangement, was issued as a single under the revised title “Help Me, Rhonda”. The single peaked at number one in the United States, making it the second Beach Boys single to reach that position after “I Get Around” in 1964. The single version was later released on the album Summer Days (And Summer Nights!!) in June 1965.

Ticket to Ride

“Ticket to Ride” is a song by the English rock group the Beatles, written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney. Issued as a single in April 1965, it became the Beatles’ seventh consecutive number 1 hit in the United Kingdom and their third consecutive number 1 hit in the United States, and similarly topped national charts in Canada, Australia and Ireland. The song was also included on their 1965 studio album Help! Recorded at EMI Studios in London in February that year, the track marked a progression in the Beatles’ work through the incorporation of drone and harder-sounding instrumentation relative to their previous releases. Among music critics, Ian MacDonald describes the song as “psychologically deeper than anything the Beatles had recorded before” and “extraordinary for its time”.[3]

“Ticket to Ride” appears in a sequence in the Beatles’ second feature film, Help!, directed by Richard Lester. Live performances by the band were included in the Beatles at Shea Stadium concert film, on the live album documenting their concerts at the Hollywood Bowl, and on the 1996 Anthology 2 box set. In 1969, “Ticket to Ride” was covered by the brother and sister pop duo the Carpenters, who reached number 19 on the Adult Contemporary chart and peaked at number 54 on the Hot 100 chart with their version.

Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter

“Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” is a popular song written by British actor, screenwriter and songwriter Trevor Peacock.[1] It was originally sung by actor Tom Courtenay in The Lads, a British TV play of 1963, and released as a single on UK Decca.[2]

The best-known version of the song is by Herman’s Hermits, who took it to number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 in May 1965, and number one in Canada the month before. Herman’s Hermits had two US number-ones, the other being “I’m Henry VIII, I Am”. The band never released either track as singles in Britain. “Mrs Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” was recorded as an afterthought in two takes and featured unique muted rhythm guitar by Keith Hopwood and heavily accented vocals by Peter Noone, with backing from Karl Green and Keith Hopwood. The band never dreamed it would be a single let alone hit number one in the US. According to Noone the song was well known to British bands; it would often be performed at birthday parties, substituting the surname of the girl whose party was being celebrated, i.e., “Mrs. Smith” or “Mrs. Jones” instead of “Mrs. Brown”.

Alvin and the Chipmunks covered the song for their 1965 album Chipmunks à Go-Go.

The song was released in Japan on Odeon Records, a subsidiary of Toshiba, as OR-1272. It was backed by the song “Wonderful World”.

It was covered by Nellie McKay on her 2015 album My Weekly Reader.

The Game of Love (Wayne Fontana song)

“The Game of Love” is a 1965 song by Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, released in the States as “Game of Love”. It was covered by New Zealand musician Tex Pistol and released in 1987.

“The Game of Love” Single by Wayne Fontana and The Mindbenders  from the album The Game of Love

B-side  –  “Since You’ve Been Gone”

Released  – 1965

Genre  –  Beat, garage rock, blues rock

Length  – 2:04

Label  –  Fontana

Writer(s)  – Clint Ballard, Jr.

I’m Telling You Now

“I’m Telling You Now” is a song by Freddie Garrity and Mitch Murray, originally performed by Freddie and the Dreamers that hit number one on the American Billboard Hot 100 in 1965.[1] Murray also wrote songs for other British artists during the 1960s, including Gerry and the Pacemakers, Manfred Mann, and Georgie Fame. “I’m Telling You Now” was first released in 1963 on Capitol Records, USA/Canada and on Columbia, UK/India/Netherlands/Sweden, and was not successful. Two years later, Capitol’s subsidiary, Tower Records, re-released the song, which became extremely popular, and propelled Freddie and the Dreamers to pop-music stardom.

Stop! In the Name of Love

“Stop! In the Name of Love” is a 1965 song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label.

Written and produced by Motown’s main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, “Stop! In the Name of Love” held the number one position on the Billboard pop singles chart in the United States from March 27, 1965 through April 3, 1965,[2][3] and reached the number-two position on the soul chart.

The Supremes recorded “Stop! In the Name of Love!”[4] in January 1965 and released as a single on February 8. The song was included on the Supremes’ sixth album, More Hits by The Supremes, and was nominated for the 1966 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Rock & Roll Group Vocal Performance, losing to “Flowers on the Wall” by the Statler Brothers. The song was also honored by inclusion in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s permanent collection of the 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.

The Supremes’ choreography for this song, with one hand on the hip and the other outstretched in a “stop” gesture, is equally legendary. Paul Williams and Melvin Franklin of The Temptations taught the girls the routine backstage in London, before the Supremes’ first televised performance of the single on the Ready Steady Go! special “The Sound of Motown,” hosted by Motown enthusiast Dusty Springfield.[5] They also performed the song on an episode of the ABC variety program Shindig! which aired on Wednesday, February 24, 1965.[6]

Eight Days a Week

“Eight Days a Week” is a song by The Beatles written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon based on McCartney’s original idea,[2] The song was issued in the United Kingdom in December 1964 on the album Beatles for Sale. In the United States, issued in February 1965 as a single with the B-side “I Don’t Want to Spoil the Party”, it went to No. 1 for two weeks on 13–20 March 1965. The song was also issued in June 1965 on the U.S. album Beatles VI and reissued worldwide in 2000 on the Beatles number one compilation album 1. WLS ranked the song at #8 for all of 1965.

My Girl (The Temptations song)

“My Girl” is a 1964 standard recorded by The Temptations for the Gordy (Motown) label which became a number one hit in 1965. Written and produced by The Miracles members Smokey Robinson and Ronald White, the song became the Temptations’ first U.S. number-one single, and is today their signature song. Robinson’s inspiration for writing this song was his wife, Miracles member Claudette Rogers Robinson. The song was featured on the Temptations album The Temptations Sing Smokey.

Musically, the song is notable because the six ascending guitar notes in the opening riff over the C chord are a perfect example of a C major pentatonic scale, played exactly from octave to octave. Similarly, the analogous riff in the song that is played over the F chord is a perfect example of an F major pentatonic scale, also with notes ascending from octave to octave.

This Diamond Ring

“This Diamond Ring” is a 1965 song written by Al Kooper, Bob Brass, and Irwin Levine. It was first recorded By Sammy Ambrose on Musicor #1061, then by Gary Lewis & the Playboys[1] on Liberty #55756. Lewis’s version charted first, #101 on the January 2, 1965 Billboard “Bubbling Under” chart. Both versions charted on January 9, Lewis still at #101 and Ambrose at #117. Ambrose dropped off the charts at that point, but Lewis made #65 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart the next week (January 16) and his version continued to climb until it reached #1 on February 20, 1965.

You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’

“You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” is a song written by Phil Spector, Barry Mann, and Cynthia Weil. It was first recorded by the Righteous Brothers in 1964, and was produced by Spector. Their recording is considered by some music critics to be the ultimate expression and illustration of Spector’s “Wall of Sound” recording technique.[3] It has also been described by various music writers as “one of the best records ever made” and “the ultimate pop record”.[1]

The original Righteous Brothers version was a critical and commercial success on its release, becoming a number-one hit single in both the United States and the United Kingdom in February 1965. It was the fifth best selling song of 1965 in the US. It also entered the Top 10 in the UK chart on an unprecedented three separate occasions.[4]

“You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin'” has been covered successfully by numerous artists. A 1965 hit cover by Cilla Black reached number 2 in the UK Singles Chart. Dionne Warwick took her version to number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1969. A 1971 duet version by singers Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway peaked at number 30 on the Billboard R&B singles chart. Long John Baldry charted at number 2 in Australia with his 1979 remake and a 1980 version by Hall and Oates reached number 12 on the US Hot 100.

In December 1999, the performing-rights organization Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) ranked the song as the most-played song on American radio and television in the 20th century, having accumulated more than 8 million airplays by 1999,[5] and nearly 15 million by 2011.[6] Additionally, the song was chosen as one of the Songs of the Century by RIAA and ranked No. 34 on the list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time by Rolling Stone. In 2015, the single was inducted into the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.[7]

Come See About Me

“Come See About Me” is a 1964 song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label.

The song became third of five consecutively released Supremes songs to top the Billboard pop singles chart in the United States (the others are “Where Did Our Love Go,” “Baby Love,” “Stop! In the Name of Love,” and “Back in My Arms Again”). It topped the chart twice, non-consecutively; toppled by and later replacing The Beatles’ “I Feel Fine” in December 1964 and January 1965.[1][2]

I Feel Fine

“I Feel Fine” is a song written by John Lennon[4] (credited to Lennon–McCartney) and released in 1964 by the Beatles as the A-side of their eighth British single. The song has one of the first uses of guitar feedback in popular music.[5]

Lennon wrote the guitar riff while in the studio recording “Eight Days a Week”.[6] “I wrote ‘I Feel Fine’ around that riff going on in the background”, he recalled.[7] “I told them I’d write a song specially for the riff. So they said, ‘Yes. You go away and do that’, knowing that we’d almost finished the album Beatles for Sale. Anyway, going into the studio one morning, I said to Ringo, ‘I’ve written this song but it’s lousy’. But we tried it, complete with riff, and it sounded like an A-side, so we decided to release it just like that.”[7] Both John Lennon and George Harrison said that the riff was influenced by a riff in “Watch Your Step”, a 1961 release written and performed by Bobby Parker[7] and covered by the Beatles in concerts during 1961 and 1962.[8] Paul McCartney said the drums on “I Feel Fine” were inspired by Ray Charles’s “What’d I Say”.[4]

At the time of the song’s recording, the Beatles, having mastered the studio basics, had begun to explore new sources of inspiration in noises previously eliminated as mistakes (such as electronic goofs, twisted tapes, and talkback). “I Feel Fine” marks one of the earliest examples of the use of feedback as a recording effect in popular music. Artists such as the Kinks and the Who had already used feedback live, but Lennon remained proud of the fact that the Beatles were perhaps the first group to deliberately put it on vinyl.

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