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Over and Over (Bobby Day song)

“Over and Over” is a song written by Robert James Byrd and recorded by him using the stage name Bobby Day. Day’s version entered the Billboard Top 100 in 1958, the same week a version of the same song by Thurston Harris entered the chart. Day’s version reached #41, and was the B-side to Rockin’ Robin.[1] Thurston Harris’ version peaked at #96. In the song, the singer describes going to a party with misgivings of having a good time, until he sees a pretty girl. The singer attempts to ask her out, but she is waiting for her date to arrive. He vows to try “over and over”.

Turn! Turn! Turn!

“Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There Is a Season)” — often abbreviated to “Turn! Turn! Turn!” — is a song written by Pete Seeger in the late 1950s. The lyrics, except for the title which is repeated throughout the song and the final two lines, are adapted word-for-word from the English version of the first eight verses of the third chapter of the biblical Book of Ecclesiastes. The song was originally released in 1962 as “To Everything There Is a Season” on The Limeliters’ album Folk Matinee and then some months later on Seeger’s own The Bitter and the Sweet.[1]

The song became an international hit in late 1965 when it was covered by the American folk rock band The Byrds, entering at #80 on October 23, 1965, before reaching #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on December 4, 1965, #3 in Canada (Nov. 29, 1965), and also peaking at #26 on the UK Singles Chart. In the U.S., the song holds distinction as the #1 hit with the oldest lyrics.

I Hear a Symphony

“I Hear a Symphony” is a 1965 song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label.

Written and produced by Motown’s main production team, Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song became their sixth number-one pop hit on Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in the United States for two weeks from November 14, 1965 through November 27, 1965.[1][2] On the UK pop chart, the single peaked at number thirty-nine.

Get Off of My Cloud

“Get Off of My Cloud” is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones.[3] It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards as single to follow the successful “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”. Recorded in early September 1965 and released that November, the song topped the charts in the United Kingdom, the United States and Germany, reaching #2 in Australia and Ireland.

The Stones have said that the song is a reaction to their suddenly greatly enhanced popularity and deals with their aversion to people’s expectations of them after the success of “Satisfaction”. According to Keith Richards; “Get off of My Cloud” was basically a response to people knocking on our door asking us for the follow-up to “Satisfaction”… We thought ‘At last. We can sit back and maybe think about events’. Suddenly there’s the knock at the door and of course what came out of that was “Get off of My Cloud”.[4] In 1971 he commented; “I never dug it as a record. The chorus was a nice idea, but we rushed it as the follow-up. We were in L.A., and it was time for another single. But how do you follow-up “Satisfaction”? Actually, what I wanted was to do it slow like a Lee Dorsey thing. We rocked it up. I thought it was one of Andrew Loog Oldham’s worst productions.”[5]

In a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone, Jagger said, “That was Keith’s melody and my lyrics. … It’s a stop-bugging-me, post-teenage-alienation song. The grown-up world was a very ordered society in the early ’60s, and I was coming out of it. America was even more ordered than anywhere else. I found it was a very restrictive society in thought and behavior and dress.”[6]

“I was sick and tired, fed up with this and decided to take a drive downtown

It was so very quiet and peaceful, there was nobody, not a soul around

I laid myself out, I was so tired and I started to dream

In the morning the parking tickets were just like flags stuck on my windscreen”

The song is in E major and is built on variants of the “Louie Louie” riff, a short repeating pattern of the chords I, IV and V, in this case E–A–B–A. The arrangement is noted for its drum intro by Charlie Watts and twin guitars by Brian Jones and Keith Richards.[7] Brian Jones’ twelve-string guitar part can only just be heard in the mono mix of the song but can be clearly heard in some unofficial stereo remixes.

Yesterday (Beatles song)

“Yesterday” is a song by English rock band The Beatles written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney) first released on the album Help! in the United Kingdom in August 1965.

“Yesterday”, with the B-side “Act Naturally”, was released as a single in the United States in September 1965. While it topped the American chart in October the song also hit the British top 10 in a cover version by Matt Monro. The song also appeared on the UK EP “Yesterday” in March 1966 and the Beatles’ US album Yesterday and Today, released in June 1966.

McCartney’s vocal and acoustic guitar, together with a string quartet, essentially made for the first solo performance of the band. It remains popular today with more than 2,200 cover versions[2] and is one of the most covered songs in the history of recorded music.[note 1] “Yesterday” was voted the best song of the 20th century in a 1999 BBC Radio 2 poll of music experts and listeners and was also voted the No. 1 pop song of all time by MTV and Rolling Stone magazine the following year. In 1997, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone.[4]

“Yesterday” is a melancholy ballad about the break-up of a relationship. The singer laments for yesterday when he and his love were together, before she left because of something he said. McCartney is the only member of the Beatles to appear on the recording. The final recording was so different from other works by the Beatles that the band members vetoed the release of the song as a single in the United Kingdom, although other artists were quick to do so. It was issued as a single in the US in September 1965 and later released as a single in the UK in 1976.

Hang On Sloopy

“Hang On Sloopy” is a 1964 song by Wes Farrell and Bert Berns, originally titled “My Girl Sloopy”. It peaked at number 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100.

According to Rick Derringer, the original version of Sloopy was written by a “high school kid in St. Louis” and sold to Bert Russell, a.k.a. Bert Berns.[1] If true, the answer to the age old question “Just who is Sloopy?” lies with him. “My Girl Sloopy” was first recorded by L.A.-based The Vibrations in 1964, for Atlantic Records (45-2222), reaching #10 on the R&B chart and #26 on the US pop chart.[2] In April 1965[3] the song became a local hit in the Pacific Northwest in a cover version by James Henry & The Olympics (Jerden Records),[4] but it was quickly eclipsed in August when the Indiana pop group The McCoys released their iconic retitled version. “Hang On Sloopy” went to #1 in the United States in October 1965.[5]

Eve of Destruction (song)

“Eve of Destruction” is a protest song written by P. F. Sloan in mid-1964.[1] Several artists have recorded it, but the best-known recording was by Barry McGuire. This recording was made between July 12 and July 15, 1965 and released by Dunhill Records. The accompanying musicians were top-tier LA session players: P. F. Sloan on guitar, Hal Blaine (of Phil Spector’s “Wrecking Crew”) on drums, and Larry Knechtel on bass. The vocal track was thrown on as a rough mix and was not intended to be the final version, but a copy of the recording “leaked” out to a DJ, who began playing it.[2] The song was an instant hit and as a result the more polished vocal track that was at first envisioned was never recorded.

McGuire’s single hit #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and #3 on the UK Singles Chart in September 1965.

Help! (song)

“Help!” is a song by the Beatles that served as the title song for both the 1965 film and its soundtrack album. It was also released as a single, and was number one for three weeks in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

“Help!” was written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney. During an interview with Playboy in 1980, Lennon recounted: “The whole Beatles thing was just beyond comprehension. I was subconsciously crying out for help”.

I Got You Babe

“I Got You Babe” is a song written by Sonny Bono. It was the first single taken from the debut studio album Look at Us, of the American pop music duo Sonny & Cher. In August 1965, their single spent three weeks at number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States[1] where it sold more than 1 million copies and was certified Gold. It also reached number 1 in the United Kingdom and Canada. In 1985, a cover version of “I Got You Babe” by British reggae/pop band UB40 featuring American singer Chrissie Hynde, peaked at number one in the UK Singles Chart and reached number 28 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. A 1993 version by Cher with Beavis and Butt-Head bubbled under the Hot 100 chart.

I’m Henery the Eighth, I Am

“I’m Henery the Eighth, I Am” (also “I’m Henery the VIII, I Am” or “I’m Henry VIII, I Am”; spelled “Henery” but pronounced “‘Enery” in the Cockney style normally used to sing it) is a 1910 British music hall song by Fred Murray and R. P. Weston. It was a signature song of the music hall star Harry Champion. In 1965, it became the fastest-selling song in history to that point when it was revived by Herman’s Hermits,[1] becoming the group’s second number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The lead solo on the Hermits’ version was played by the group’s lead guitarist Derek “Lek” Leckenby.[2]

In the well-known chorus, Henery explains that his wife had been married seven times before:

I’m ‘Enery the Eighth, I am,

‘Enery the Eighth I am, I am!

I got married to the widow next door,

She’s been married seven times before

And every one was an ‘Enery

She wouldn’t have a Willie nor a Sam

I’m her eighth old man named ‘Enery

‘Enery the Eighth, I am!

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