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Love Child (song)

“Love Child” is a 1968 song released by the Motown label for Diana Ross & the Supremes. The second single and title track from their album Love Child, it became the Supremes’ 11th number-one single in the United States.

The song became the number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100 pop chart for two weeks, from November 30, 1968 through December 14, 1968[1][2] and reached number two on the soul chart for three weeks. “Love Child” is notable for its then-controversial subject matter of illegitimacy.[3] It is also notable for knocking the Beatles’ “Hey Jude” off the top spot in the United States. The Supremes debuted the song on the season premiere of the CBS variety program The Ed Sullivan Show on Sunday, September 29, 1968.[4][5] Billboard Magazine ranked “Love Child” as The Supremes’ biggest #1 song.[6]

Hey Jude

“Hey Jude” is a song by the English rock band the Beatles, written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney. The ballad evolved from “Hey Jules”, a song McCartney wrote to comfort John Lennon’s son, Julian, during his parents’ divorce. “Hey Jude” begins with a verse-bridge structure incorporating McCartney’s vocal performance and piano accompaniment; further instrumentation is added as the song progresses. After the fourth verse, the song shifts to a fade-out coda that lasts for more than four minutes.

“Hey Jude” was released in August 1968 as the first single from the Beatles’ record label Apple Records. More than seven minutes in length, it was at the time the longest single ever to top the British charts.[1] It also spent nine weeks at number one in the United States, the longest for any Beatles single. “Hey Jude” tied the “all-time” record, at the time, for the longest run at the top of the US charts. The single has sold approximately eight million copies and is frequently included on professional critics’ lists of the greatest songs of all time. In 2013, Billboard named it the 10th biggest song of all time.[2]

Harper Valley PTA

“Harper Valley PTA” is a country song written by Tom T. Hall that was a major international hit single for country singer Jeannie C. Riley in 1968. Riley’s record sold over six million copies as a single. The song made Riley the first woman to top both the Billboard Hot 100 and the U.S. Hot Country Singles charts with the same song, a feat that would go unrepeated until Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5” in 1981.

The song tells the story of Mrs. Johnson, a widowed mother of a teenage girl, who becomes outraged when one afternoon her daughter brings home a note from her junior high school’s PTA decrying Mrs. Johnson’s supposedly scandalous behavior by small-town standards. According to the PTA she is setting a bad example for her daughter. In response, Mrs. Johnson attends the next PTA meeting (being held that same afternoon), wearing a miniskirt, to the surprise of the PTA members. She then exposes various episodes of misbehavior and indiscretion on the part of several members of the PTA, concluding with, “This is just a little Peyton Place / And you’re all Harper Valley hypocrites.”

People Got to Be Free

“People Got to Be Free” is a song released in 1968 by The Rascals. Written by group members Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati and featuring a lead vocal from Cavaliere, it is a musically upbeat but impassioned plea for tolerance and freedom:

All the world over, so easy to see!

People everywhere, just wanna be free.

Listen, please listen! that’s the way it should be

Peace in the valley, people got to be free.

In the song’s coda, Felix says in a half-sung, half-spoken voice, that the “Train of Freedom”, is “about to arrive any minute now”, that “it has been long, long overdue”, and that it’s “coming right on through”, before the song’s fade with Felix saying “Chug” repeatedly.

It became a big hit in the turbulent summer of 1968, spending five weeks atop the Billboard Pop Singles chart, the group’s longest such stay.[1] It was also the group’s second-most successful single on the Billboard Black Singles chart, reaching number 14 and trailing only the previous year’s “Groovin'”.[2] “People Got to Be Free” was RIAA-certified as a gold record on August 23, 1968,[3] and eventually sold over 4 million copies.[4] It later was included on the group’s March 1969 album Freedom Suite. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 5 song for 1968.[5]

The single’s picture sleeve photo was previously featured in the inner album cover of the Rascals’ Time Peace: The Rascals’ Greatest Hits compilation. The B-side, “My World”, was a track from the group’s Once Upon a Dream album.

The Rascals performed “People Got to Be Free” during their 2013 Once Upon a Dream show, with footage of 1960s civil rights marches displayed on the video screen behind them.

While “People Got to Be Free” was perceived by some as related to the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy earlier that year, it was recorded before the latter’s death. In fact it was partly a reaction to an ugly encounter wherein the long-haired group was threatened by a group of strangers after their tour vehicle broke down in Fort Pierce, Florida.[6]

The song is clearly a product of its times; however, two decades later writer Dave Marsh included it as number 237 in his book Heart of Rock and Soul: The 1001 Greatest Singles of All Time, saying in reference to, and paraphrase of, the song’s lyric, “Ask me my opinion, my opinion will be: Dated, but NEVER out of date.”

After this song came out, the Rascals would only perform at concerts that featured an African American act; if those conditions were not met, the Rascals canceled several shows in protest.

Dionne Warwick recorded the song as part of her LP Soulful in 1969, and it was released as a single in the UK in the same year. The 5th Dimension recorded “People Got to Be Free” in 1970 as part of a medley with another socially relevant song, Sam Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come.” The pairing reached number 60 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart.

Johnny Maestro & the Brooklyn Bridge performed this song live in concert, and it has turned up on YouTube as part of The Bridge’s “lost tapes” series of songs.

Hello, I Love You

“Hello, I Love You” is a hit song by the American rock band The Doors from their 1968 album Waiting for the Sun. It was released as a single that same year, reaching number one in the United States and selling over a million copies in the U.S. alone. In Canada, it hit number one as well.[1] The single also became the band’s first big UK hit, peaking at number fifteen on the chart.

This was one of the six songs performed by The Doors on the demo for Aura Records in 1965.

Sometimes the title is listed as “Hello, I Love You (Won’t You Tell Me Your Name?)” or “Hello, I Love You, Won’t You Tell Me Your Name?” The title that is printed depends on how early of a pressing the record is.

Grazing in the Grass

“Grazing in the Grass” is an instrumental composed by Philemon Hou and first recorded by the South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela. Released in the United States as a single in 1968, it hit no. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart,[1] ranking it as the 18th biggest hit of the year.[2]

The title phrase was rumoured[when?] to be a synonym for the practice of smoking marijuana, one of whose nicknames is “grass.”

“Grazing in the Grass” was inspired by an earlier Masekela recording, “Mr. Bull No. 5”. Hou, an actor and singer, came up with the melody while the backing track was already being recorded. The session was held at Gold Star Studios in Hollywood.[3]

This Guy’s in Love with You

“This Guy’s in Love with You” is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, and recorded by Herb Alpert. Although known primarily for his trumpet playing as the leader of the Tijuana Brass, Alpert sang lead vocals on this solo recording, arranged by Bacharach.

As documented in a Biography cable episode featuring Bacharach, the recording originated when Alpert asked Bacharach, “Say, Burt, do you happen to have any old compositions lying around that you and Hal never recorded; maybe one I might use?” Alpert said he made it his practice to ask songwriters that particular question; often a lost “pearl” was revealed. As it happened, Bacharach recalled one, found the lyrics and score sheet, and offered it to Alpert: “Here, Herb … you might like this one.”[citation needed]

Alpert saw the possibilities in it for himself. The composition had a recognizable Bacharach-David feel, a spot for a signature horn solo in the bridge and in the fadeout, and it was an easy song to sing within Alpert’s vocal range. He originally sang “This Guy’s in Love with You” on a 1968 television special, The Beat of the Brass. In response to numerous viewer telephone calls following the broadcast, Alpert decided that the song should be released as a single recording, and it reached No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in June of that year, remaining in the top position for four weeks. It was not only Alpert’s first No. 1 single, but it was also the first No. 1 single for his A&M record label. The song also spent ten weeks at No. 1 on the Easy Listening chart. For the single’s B-side, Alpert chose “A Quiet Tear,” an album track from his first album in 1962, The Lonely Bull.

Eleven years later Alpert became the first (and only) artist to have reached the prized No. 1 position of the Billboard Hot 100 with both a vocal performance and an instrumental performance when his instrumental, “Rise”, reached the top of the hit chart.

“This Guy’s in Love with You” was succeeded at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 by “Grazing In The Grass”, an instrumental by Hugh Masekela. On the Billboard Easy Listening chart, Alpert’s song was both preceded and succeeded at No. 1 by instrumental hits from Hugo Montenegro (“The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”) and Mason Williams (“Classical Gas”), respectively. Besides this hit in English, he recorded the song in Spanish and Italian.

Mrs. Robinson

“Mrs. Robinson” is a song by American music duo Simon & Garfunkel from their fourth studio album, Bookends (1968). Produced by the duo and Roy Halee, it is famous for its inclusion in the 1967 film The Graduate. The song was written by Paul Simon, who pitched it to director Mike Nichols alongside Art Garfunkel after Nichols rejected two other songs intended for the film. The song contains a famous reference to baseball star Joe DiMaggio.

“Mrs. Robinson” became the duo’s second chart-topper, hitting number one on the Billboard Hot 100, and peaking within the top 10 of multiple other countries, including the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Spain, among others. In 1969, it became the first rock song to win the Grammy Award for Record of the Year. The song has been covered by a number of artists, including Frank Sinatra, the Lemonheads, and Bon Jovi. In 2004, it finished at #6 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

Tighten Up (Archie Bell & the Drells song)

“Tighten Up” is a 1968 song by Houston, Texas–based R&B vocal group Archie Bell & the Drells. It reached #1 on both the Billboard R&B and pop charts in the spring of 1968. It is ranked #265 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and is one of the earliest funk hits in music history.

“Tighten Up” was written by Archie Bell and Billy Buttier.[2] It was one of the first songs that Archie Bell & the Drells recorded, in a session in October 1967 at the Jones Town Studio in Houston, Texas, along with a number of songs including “She’s My Woman”. The instrumental backing for “Tighten Up” was provided by the T.S.U. Toronadoes, the group which had developed it[3]in their own live shows before they brought it to Archie Bell & the Drells at the suggestion of Skipper Lee Frazer, a Houston disk jockey who worked with both groups. At the recording session, the Drells worked late into the night with the Toronadoes as Archie Bell perfected the vocals. [4] [5]

Soon afterwards, Bell was drafted into the U.S. Army and began serving in Vietnam. Meanwhile, the song became a hit in Houston, and was picked up by Atlantic Records for distribution in April 1968. By the summer it topped both the Billboard R&B and pop charts. It also sold a million copies by May 1968, gaining an RIAA gold disc.[2]

In the beginning of the song, Bell introduces himself and the Drells as being from Houston, Texas. According to the Billboard Book of Number One Hits by Fred Bronson, Bell had heard a comment after the Kennedy assassination in Dallas that “nothing good ever came out of Texas.” Bell wanted his listeners to know “we were from Texas and we were good.”

Bell continues in the song by stating, “We don’t only sing, but we dance just as good as we want.” This line is often misheard, and mis-transcribed, as “dance just as good as we walk”. Asked to clarify by writer Michael Corcoran, Archie Bell responded, “We dance just as good as we want. Hell, we dance a lot better than we walk.”[citation needed]

Although their leader was unavailable, the phenomenal success of the single prompted the band to rush out their first album, which included the songs they had recorded in late 1967 and early 1968 with The Toronadoes. [4] [6]

In 1969 the group recorded their first full album with Gamble and Huff, I Can’t Stop Dancing, which reached number 28 on the R&B chart.

At the 1968 Olympics, American Olympian Wyomia Tyus was doing a dance waiting at the start line of the 100 meter race in which she became the first person to repeat as Olympic Gold medalist in the event. When interviewed later by Olympic documentarian Bud Greenspan about what she was doing, she credited dancing to this song, a current hit at the time that was being sung and played on bongos by American fans near the start line.[7]

Honey (Bobby Goldsboro song)

“Honey”, also known as “Honey (I Miss You)”, is a song written by Bobby Russell. He first produced it with former Kingston Trio member Bob Shane. Then he gave it to American singer Bobby Goldsboro, who recorded it for his 1968 album of the same name, originally titled Pledge of Love.

The song’s narrator mourns his deceased lover, beginning with him looking at a tree in their garden, remembering how “it was just a twig” on the day she planted it (with his disapproval). This single about the loss of a loved one hit No. 1 the week after Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis. Further, the Hot 100 top 10 run of “Honey” began the week of the King assassination and ended the week of the assassination of Robert Kennedy, and no other Hot 100 entry had a top 10 run that spanned that same time interval.[2]

(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay

“(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” is a song co-written by soul singer Otis Redding and guitarist Steve Cropper. It was recorded by Redding twice in 1967, including once just days before his death in a plane crash. The song was released on Stax Records’ Volt label in 1968,[2] becoming the first posthumous single to top the charts in the US.[3] It reached number 3 on the UK Singles Chart.

Redding started writing the lyrics to the song in August 1967, while sitting on a rented houseboat in Sausalito, California. He completed the song with the help of Cropper, who was a Stax producer and the guitarist for Booker T. and the M.G.’s. The song features whistling and sounds of waves crashing on a shore.

Love Is Blue

“L’amour est bleu” (English title: “Love Is Blue”) is a song whose music was composed by André Popp, and whose lyrics were written by Pierre Cour, in 1967. Brian Blackburn later wrote English-language lyrics for it. First performed in French by Greek singer Vicky Leandros (appearing as Vicky) as the Luxembourgian entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 1967, it has since been recorded by many other musicians, most notably French orchestra leader Paul Mauriat, whose familiar instrumental version became the only number-one hit by a French artist to top the Billboard Hot 100 in America.

The song describes the pleasure and pain of love in terms of colours (blue and grey) and elements (water and wind). The English lyrics (“Blue, blue, my world is blue …”) focus on colours only (blue, grey, red, green, and black), using them to describe elements of lost love. The English version by Vicky Leandros also appeared as “Colours of Love” in some locations including the UK.

Green Tambourine

“Green Tambourine” is a song about busking, written and composed by Paul Leka (who also produced it) and Shelly Pinz, that was the primary hit by the 1960s Ohio-based rock group The Lemon Pipers, as well as the title track to their debut-album Green Tambourine. The song has been credited as being one of the first bubblegum pop chart-toppers. Released towards the end of 1967, it spent 13 weeks on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 1 on February 3, 1968[5] and earned the group a gold record for over a million copies sold. The record remained on the chart for three months.[6] It was also the first U.S. number-one hit for the Buddah label. The Lemon Pipers would never repeat this success, although “Rice Is Nice” and “Jelly Jungle” did make it onto the charts in 1968.[6]

The song tells the story of a street musician pleading for someone to give him money. In exchange he offers to play his green tambourine. The song’s instrumentation contains the titular tambourine as well as an electric sitar,[7] a frequent signature of the so-called “psychedelic sound.” Another hook is the heavy, psychedelic tape echo applied to the word “play” in each chorus and at the end, fading into a drumroll (“Listen while I play play play play play play play my green tambourine”). The echo is noticeably different in the mono and stereo mixes.[citation needed] The mono version also starts fading out slightly earlier than in the stereo version.[citation needed] The musical arrangement also features sweeping orchestrated strings and the distinctive vibraslap percussion instrument. While the Lemon Pipers played on the record, producer and joint author-composer Leka hired a string section to accompany the band to add extra depth to the already psychedelic arrangement.[citation needed] the string section consisted of Elliot Rosoff, David Sackson, Irving Spice, Louise Stone, Louis Gaborwitz and Deborah Idol on violin, Seymour Berman on viola, Seymour Barab and Sally Rosoff on cello.[citation needed]

The single’s B-side, “No Help From Me,” featured lead vocal by keyboardist Bob Nave and did not appear on either of the group’s two albums.a

Judy in Disguise (With Glasses)

“Judy In Disguise (With Glasses)” is a song that was a hit for the Louisiana-based John Fred and his Playboy Band in late 1967. The song was jointly written and composed by Fred and bandmate Andrew Bernard.

The song features strings, brass, a sitar, piano, bass, guitar, drums, breathing sounds, and dissonant string sounds. Its title is a play on, and a mondegreen of, “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.” (Fred thought the lyrics were “Lucy in disguise with diamonds” when he first heard the selection.)[1][2]

The other members of the Playboy Band did not like the unusual slow abrupt ending with Fred intoning the final line, “I guess I’ll just take your glasses.”[3]

The song reached #1 in the U.S., Germany[4] and Switzerland,[5]#3 in Great Britain and Ireland.[6] and #25 in Canada

Hello, Goodbye

“Hello, Goodbye” is a song by the English rock band the Beatles, written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney. Backed by John Lennon’s “I Am the Walrus”, it was issued as a non-album single in November 1967, the group’s first release since the death of their manager, Brian Epstein. The single was commercially successful around the world, topping charts in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and several other countries.

McCartney later said that the lyrics take duality as their theme. The song originated when, in response to a question from Beatles aide Alistair Taylor about songwriting, McCartney sat down at a harmonium and asked Taylor to say the opposite of whatever he said. The completed song includes a musical coda, which was improvised by the Beatles when they were recording the track in October 1967. Unimpressed with the composition, Lennon pushed for “I Am the Walrus” to be the single’s A-side, but McCartney and the band’s producer, George Martin, opted for the more commercial-sounding “Hello, Goodbye”. The Beatles produced three promotional films for the song, one of which was shown on The Ed Sullivan Show in America. Due to regulations against lip-syncing in Britain, none of the clips were aired there.

“Hello, Goodbye” has traditionally received a varied response from music critics. While some reviewers praise the song for its classic pop qualities, others deem it unadventurous by the Beatles’ standards and inconsequential. The track was included on the expanded US release of the Magical Mystery Tour soundtrack EP, and later appeared on compilation albums such as 1967–1970 and 1. McCartney has often performed “Hello, Goodbye” in concert, beginning with his Driving World Tour in 2002. James Last, Bud Shank, Allen Toussaint, the Cure and the cast of Glee are among the acts who have also recorded the song.

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