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Fly, Robin, Fly

“Fly, Robin, Fly” is a song by German disco group Silver Convention from their debut studio album Save Me (1975). Sylvester Levay and Stephan Prager wrote the song, and the latter produced it. “Fly, Robin, Fly” was released as the third single from Save Me in September 1975, peaking at number one on the United States Billboard Hot 100. Thanks to the success of “Fly, Robin, Fly”, Silver Convention became the first German act to have a number one song on the American music charts.

“Fly, Robin, Fly” carries the distinction of being a Billboard chart-topper with only six words: the chorus simply repeats “Fly, Robin, fly” three times, with an ending of “Up, up to the sky”. During a segment on VH1’s 100 Greatest Dance Songs, it was revealed that the original working title was “Run, Rabbit, Run”.

That’s the Way (I Like It)

“That’s the Way (I Like It)” is a song by the American group KC and the Sunshine Band from their second studio album. At the time, this song was considered by some to be rather risqué because of the obvious meaning behind the title as well as its chorus with multiple “uh-huhs” and its verses.[citation needed]The song is in natural minor.[2]

“That’s the Way (I Like It)” became the band’s second number-one hit in the Billboard Hot 100, and it is one of the few chart-toppers in history to hit number one on more than one occasion during a one-month period, as it did between November and December 1975. This song topped the American pop chart for one week, and then it was replaced by another disco song, “Fly, Robin, Fly” by Silver Convention. “That’s the Way (I Like It)” returned to number-one for one more week after “Fly, Robin, Fly” completed three weeks at the top. “That’s the Way (I Like It)” also spent one week at number-one in the soul singles chart.[3]

The song was also an international chart hit, reaching #1 in Canada[4] and the Netherlands and charting in Australia (#5), Belgium (#2), Germany (#20), Ireland (#17), New Zealand (#12), Norway (#5) and the UK (#4).

For release as a single and radio airplay, the song was toned down from the original recording, which would have jeopardized getting radio airplay at the time. However the sexual overtones may have improved the record’s reception at discos, increasing its overall popularity in the charts.[5]

Island Girl

“Island Girl” is a song performed by Elton John that went to number one for three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 in the U.S.[1] and number 14 in the UK in 1975. In the U.S., it was certified Gold in 1975 and Platinum in 1995 by the RIAA.[2] It was the first single taken from the album Rock of the Westies.

The song which “Island Girl” replaced at number one was “Bad Blood,” by Neil Sedaka. Elton had provided uncredited backing and duetting vocals on this collaboration.

The lyrics are about a prostitute in New York City and a man who wants to take a prostitute back to Jamaica.

Bad Blood (Neil Sedaka song)

“Bad Blood” is a popular song written by Neil Sedaka and Phil Cody. The song, with uncredited backing vocals by Elton John, reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1975, remaining in the top position for three weeks. It was certified gold by the RIAA and was the most successful individual commercial release in Sedaka’s career. “Bad Blood” was replaced at the #1 spot by John’s single, “Island Girl”.

Single by Neil Sedaka from the album Overnight Success The Hungry Years

B-side    “Your Favorite Entertainer” (US), “Hey Mister Sunshine” (UK), “Baby Blue” (Italy)

Released – September 1975

Writer(s) –  Neil Sedaka, Phil Cody

Calypso (song)

“Calypso” is a song written by John Denver in 1975 as a tribute to Jacques-Yves Cousteau and his research ship, the Calypso.[1] The song was featured on Denver’s 1975 album Windsong.
Released as the B-side of “I’m Sorry”, “Calypso” received substantial airplay, enabling it to chart on the

Billboard Hot 100.[2] After “I’m Sorry” fell out of the #1 position, “Calypso” began receiving more airplay than “I’m Sorry,” thus causing Billboard to list “Calypso” as the new A-side.[1] Hence, “Calypso” is itself considered a #2 hit on the Hot 100.[3]

John Denver was a close friend of Jacques-Yves Cousteau. Calypso was the name of Jacques Cousteau’s research boat that sailed around the world for ocean conservation.

I’m Sorry (John Denver song)

“I’m Sorry” is a song written and recorded by American country-folk singer-songwriter John Denver. Released in 1975, it was his final number-one pop hit released during his career.

The song, an apology for forsaken love,[1] “I’m Sorry” reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on September 27, 1975, as well as reaching number one on the Easy Listening chart.[2] Six weeks after topping the pop chart, the song was Denver’s third and final number one on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart.[3]

The flip side of “I’m Sorry” was “Calypso”, and, like its A-side, enjoyed substantial radio airplay on Top 40 stations.

Fame (David Bowie song)

“Fame” is a song recorded by David Bowie, initially released in 1975. Written by Bowie, Carlos Alomar and John Lennon, it was a hit in North America, becoming Bowie’s first number 1 single in the Billboard Hot 100 and one of the most successful singles of the year, ranking at number 7 on the Billboard Year-End Hot 100. The single was less successful in Europe, reaching number 17 in the UK Singles Chart.

The song is included in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.[2]

Rhinestone Cowboy

“Rhinestone Cowboy” is a song written by Larry Weiss and most famously recorded by American country music singer Glen Campbell with instrumental backing by the Wrecking Crew, L.A. session musicians.[1] The song enjoyed immense popularity with both country and pop audiences when it was released in 1975.

Weiss wrote and recorded “Rhinestone Cowboy” in 1974, and it appeared on his 20th Century Records album Black and Blue Suite. It did not, however, have much of a commercial impact as a single. In late 1974, Campbell heard the song on the radio, and during a tour of Australia, decided to learn the song. Soon after his return to the United States, Campbell went to Al Coury’s office at Capitol Records, where he was approached about “a great new song” — “Rhinestone Cowboy”.[2]

Several music writers noted that Campbell identified with the subject matter of “Rhinestone Cowboy” — survival and making it, particularly when the chips are down — very strongly. As Steven Thomas Erlewine of Allmusic put it, the song is about a veteran artist “who’s aware that he’s more than paid his dues during his career … but is still surviving, and someday, he’ll shine just like a rhinestone cowboy.”[3]

Get Down Tonight

“Get Down Tonight” is a song released in 1975 on the self-titled album by the disco group KC and the Sunshine Band. The song became widely successful, becoming the first of their five No. 1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100. It also reached the top of the Hot Soul Singles chart[4] and was an international chart hit, reaching No. 1 in Canada and charting in Australia (No. 44), Belgium (No. 11), the Netherlands (No. 5), and the UK (No. 21).

The song displays some of the signature characteristics of the disco era such as a fast tempo and repeating lyrics. The song also features a distinctive introduction, employing a guitar solo rendered at double-speed.[5][6]

The song was originally titled “What You Want Is What You Get” before KC changed the title to “Get Down Tonight”.[citation needed]

Fallin’ in Love (Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds song)

“Fallin’ In Love” is a song recorded and released by the trio of Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds. The song was written by band member Dan Hamilton. Released in the summer of 1975, the song became the group’s second Top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the U.S. (following 1971’s “Don’t Pull Your Love” which peaked at #4), and it was their only song to reach the #1 position on this chart. It was also the only pop #1 hit for the Playboy Records label.[1]

“Fallin’ in Love” was also a #1 hit on the adult contemporary chart in the U.S. for one week in 1975.[2] In addition, the song reached number twenty-four on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart.[3]

The song was covered by La Bouche in 1995 on their debut album Sweet Dreams, and sampled by Canadian rapper/singer Drake for his single “Best I Ever Had”.
The song was featured in the 2007 film The Hitcher.

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