eurohitlist.eu

Fly, Robin, Fly

“Fly, Robin, Fly” is a song by German disco group Silver Convention from their debut studio album Save Me (1975). Sylvester Levay and Stephan Prager wrote the song, and the latter produced it. “Fly, Robin, Fly” was released as the third single from Save Me in September 1975, peaking at number one on the United States Billboard Hot 100. Thanks to the success of “Fly, Robin, Fly”, Silver Convention became the first German act to have a number one song on the American music charts.

“Fly, Robin, Fly” carries the distinction of being a Billboard chart-topper with only six words: the chorus simply repeats “Fly, Robin, fly” three times, with an ending of “Up, up to the sky”. During a segment on VH1’s 100 Greatest Dance Songs, it was revealed that the original working title was “Run, Rabbit, Run”.

That’s the Way (I Like It)

“That’s the Way (I Like It)” is a song by the American group KC and the Sunshine Band from their second studio album. At the time, this song was considered by some to be rather risqué because of the obvious meaning behind the title as well as its chorus with multiple “uh-huhs” and its verses.[citation needed]The song is in natural minor.[2]

“That’s the Way (I Like It)” became the band’s second number-one hit in the Billboard Hot 100, and it is one of the few chart-toppers in history to hit number one on more than one occasion during a one-month period, as it did between November and December 1975. This song topped the American pop chart for one week, and then it was replaced by another disco song, “Fly, Robin, Fly” by Silver Convention. “That’s the Way (I Like It)” returned to number-one for one more week after “Fly, Robin, Fly” completed three weeks at the top. “That’s the Way (I Like It)” also spent one week at number-one in the soul singles chart.[3]

The song was also an international chart hit, reaching #1 in Canada[4] and the Netherlands and charting in Australia (#5), Belgium (#2), Germany (#20), Ireland (#17), New Zealand (#12), Norway (#5) and the UK (#4).

For release as a single and radio airplay, the song was toned down from the original recording, which would have jeopardized getting radio airplay at the time. However the sexual overtones may have improved the record’s reception at discos, increasing its overall popularity in the charts.[5]

Island Girl

“Island Girl” is a song performed by Elton John that went to number one for three weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 in the U.S.[1] and number 14 in the UK in 1975. In the U.S., it was certified Gold in 1975 and Platinum in 1995 by the RIAA.[2] It was the first single taken from the album Rock of the Westies.

The song which “Island Girl” replaced at number one was “Bad Blood,” by Neil Sedaka. Elton had provided uncredited backing and duetting vocals on this collaboration.

The lyrics are about a prostitute in New York City and a man who wants to take a prostitute back to Jamaica.

Bad Blood (Neil Sedaka song)

“Bad Blood” is a popular song written by Neil Sedaka and Phil Cody. The song, with uncredited backing vocals by Elton John, reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1975, remaining in the top position for three weeks. It was certified gold by the RIAA and was the most successful individual commercial release in Sedaka’s career. “Bad Blood” was replaced at the #1 spot by John’s single, “Island Girl”.

Single by Neil Sedaka from the album Overnight Success The Hungry Years

B-side    “Your Favorite Entertainer” (US), “Hey Mister Sunshine” (UK), “Baby Blue” (Italy)

Released – September 1975

Writer(s) –  Neil Sedaka, Phil Cody

Calypso (song)

“Calypso” is a song written by John Denver in 1975 as a tribute to Jacques-Yves Cousteau and his research ship, the Calypso.[1] The song was featured on Denver’s 1975 album Windsong.
Released as the B-side of “I’m Sorry”, “Calypso” received substantial airplay, enabling it to chart on the

Billboard Hot 100.[2] After “I’m Sorry” fell out of the #1 position, “Calypso” began receiving more airplay than “I’m Sorry,” thus causing Billboard to list “Calypso” as the new A-side.[1] Hence, “Calypso” is itself considered a #2 hit on the Hot 100.[3]

John Denver was a close friend of Jacques-Yves Cousteau. Calypso was the name of Jacques Cousteau’s research boat that sailed around the world for ocean conservation.

I’m Sorry (John Denver song)

“I’m Sorry” is a song written and recorded by American country-folk singer-songwriter John Denver. Released in 1975, it was his final number-one pop hit released during his career.

The song, an apology for forsaken love,[1] “I’m Sorry” reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on September 27, 1975, as well as reaching number one on the Easy Listening chart.[2] Six weeks after topping the pop chart, the song was Denver’s third and final number one on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart.[3]

The flip side of “I’m Sorry” was “Calypso”, and, like its A-side, enjoyed substantial radio airplay on Top 40 stations.

Fame (David Bowie song)

“Fame” is a song recorded by David Bowie, initially released in 1975. Written by Bowie, Carlos Alomar and John Lennon, it was a hit in North America, becoming Bowie’s first number 1 single in the Billboard Hot 100 and one of the most successful singles of the year, ranking at number 7 on the Billboard Year-End Hot 100. The single was less successful in Europe, reaching number 17 in the UK Singles Chart.

The song is included in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.[2]

Rhinestone Cowboy

“Rhinestone Cowboy” is a song written by Larry Weiss and most famously recorded by American country music singer Glen Campbell with instrumental backing by the Wrecking Crew, L.A. session musicians.[1] The song enjoyed immense popularity with both country and pop audiences when it was released in 1975.

Weiss wrote and recorded “Rhinestone Cowboy” in 1974, and it appeared on his 20th Century Records album Black and Blue Suite. It did not, however, have much of a commercial impact as a single. In late 1974, Campbell heard the song on the radio, and during a tour of Australia, decided to learn the song. Soon after his return to the United States, Campbell went to Al Coury’s office at Capitol Records, where he was approached about “a great new song” — “Rhinestone Cowboy”.[2]

Several music writers noted that Campbell identified with the subject matter of “Rhinestone Cowboy” — survival and making it, particularly when the chips are down — very strongly. As Steven Thomas Erlewine of Allmusic put it, the song is about a veteran artist “who’s aware that he’s more than paid his dues during his career … but is still surviving, and someday, he’ll shine just like a rhinestone cowboy.”[3]

Get Down Tonight

“Get Down Tonight” is a song released in 1975 on the self-titled album by the disco group KC and the Sunshine Band. The song became widely successful, becoming the first of their five No. 1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100. It also reached the top of the Hot Soul Singles chart[4] and was an international chart hit, reaching No. 1 in Canada and charting in Australia (No. 44), Belgium (No. 11), the Netherlands (No. 5), and the UK (No. 21).

The song displays some of the signature characteristics of the disco era such as a fast tempo and repeating lyrics. The song also features a distinctive introduction, employing a guitar solo rendered at double-speed.[5][6]

The song was originally titled “What You Want Is What You Get” before KC changed the title to “Get Down Tonight”.[citation needed]

Fallin’ in Love (Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds song)

“Fallin’ In Love” is a song recorded and released by the trio of Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds. The song was written by band member Dan Hamilton. Released in the summer of 1975, the song became the group’s second Top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the U.S. (following 1971’s “Don’t Pull Your Love” which peaked at #4), and it was their only song to reach the #1 position on this chart. It was also the only pop #1 hit for the Playboy Records label.[1]

“Fallin’ in Love” was also a #1 hit on the adult contemporary chart in the U.S. for one week in 1975.[2] In addition, the song reached number twenty-four on Billboard’s Hot Soul Singles chart.[3]

The song was covered by La Bouche in 1995 on their debut album Sweet Dreams, and sampled by Canadian rapper/singer Drake for his single “Best I Ever Had”.
The song was featured in the 2007 film The Hitcher.

Jive Talkin’

“Jive Talkin’ ” is a song by the Bee Gees, released as a single in May 1975 by RSO Records. This was the lead single from the album Main Course and hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100; it also reached the top-five on the UK Singles Chart in the middle of 1975. Largely recognised as the group’s “comeback” song, it was their first US top-10 hit since “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart” (1971).

The song was originally called “Drive Talking”. The song’s rhythm was modelled after the sound their car made crossing the Julia Tuttle Causeway each day from Biscayne Bay to Criteria Studios in Miami.[4]

Recording for “Jive Talkin'” took place on 30 January and 2 February 1975. The scratchy guitar intro was done by Barry and the funky bass line by Maurice. The pulsing synthesiser bass line, which featured in the final recording, was (along with the pioneering work of Stevie Wonder) one of the earliest uses of “synth bass” on a pop recording. It was overdubbed by keyboardist Blue Weaver using a then state-of-the-art ARP 2600, which producer Arif Mardin had brought in for the recording of the Main Course album.[5] Weaver stated, “Usually Maurice would play bass guitar, but he was away from the studio that night. And when Maurice came back, we let him hear it and suggested he re-record the bass line on his bass guitar”. “I really liked the synth bass lines”, Maurice said. “I overdubbed certain sections to add bass extra emphasis”.

One of These Nights (song)

“One of These Nights” is a song written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey and recorded by the American rock band the Eagles. The title track from their One of These Nights album, the song became their second single to top the Billboard Hot 100 chart after “Best of My Love” and also helped propel the album to number one. The single version was shortened from the album version of the song, removing most of the song’s intro and most of its fade-out, as well. Henley is lead vocalist on the verses, while Randy Meisner sings high harmony (not lead) on the refrain. The song features a guitar solo by Don Felder that is “composed of blues-based licks and sustained string bends using an unusually meaty distortion tone.”[3]

The Hustle (song)

“The Hustle” is a disco song by songwriter/arranger Van McCoy and the Soul City Symphony. It went to number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and Hot Soul Singles charts during the summer of 1975.[2] It also peaked at number 9 on the Australian Singles Chart (Kent Music Report) and number 3 in the UK.[3] It would eventually sell over one million copies and is one of the most popular songs of the disco era. The song won the Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance early in 1976 for songs recorded in 1975.

Listen to What the Man Said

“Listen to What the Man Said” is a hit single from Wings’ 1975 album Venus and Mars. The song featured new member Joe English on drums, with guest musicians Dave Mason on guitar and Tom Scott on soprano saxophone.[2] It was a number 1 single on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the US;[3] as well, it reached number 1 in Canada on the RPM National Top Singles Chart.[4] It also reached number 6 in the UK, and reached the top ten in Norway and New Zealand and the top twenty in the Netherlands.[5][6] The single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of over one million copies.[7]

Love Will Keep Us Together

“Love Will Keep Us Together” is a song written by Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield. It was first recorded by Sedaka himself in 1973 and was released as a single in France. American pop duo Captain & Tennille covered the song in 1975, with instrumental backing by L.A. session musicians from the Wrecking Crew and had a worldwide hit with their version.[1]

“Love Will Keep Us Together” first appeared on Neil Sedaka’s 1973 studio album The Tra-La Days Are Over which did not have a US release. His version of the song made its US album debut on the 1974 compilation album Sedaka’s Back. The song was released as a single in France, on the Polydor label. In West Germany, Sedaka’s original song was also included as the B-side of his 1976 hit, “Love in the Shadows.”

In 2009, Neil Sedaka rerecorded a spoof of his song, renaming it “Lunch Will Keep Us Together” for his first children’s CD Waking Up Is Hard To Do.[2]

Sister Golden Hair

“Sister Golden Hair” is a song written by Gerry Beckley and recorded by the band America for their fifth album Hearts (1975). It was their second single to reach number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, remaining in the top position for just one week.[2]

The lyrics were largely inspired by the works of Jackson Browne. Beckley commented, “[Jackson Browne] has a knack, an ability to put words to music, that is much more like the L.A. approach to just genuine observation as opposed to simplifying it down to its bare essentials… I find Jackson can depress me a little bit, but only through his honesty; and it was that style of his which led to a song of mine, ‘Sister Golden Hair’, which is probably the more L.A. of my lyrics… [It] was one of the first times I used ‘ain’t’ in a song, but I wasn’t making an effort to. I was just putting myself in that frame of mind and I got those kind of lyrics out of it.”[3] Although the song is a message from a man to his lover, explaining that he still loves her despite being not ready for marriage, the title was initially inspired by the mothers of all three members of the group, all of whom were blondes.

Thank God I’m a Country Boy

“Thank God I’m a Country Boy”, also known as “Country Boy”, is a song written by John Martin Sommers[1] and recorded by American singer/songwriter John Denver.

The song was originally included on Denver’s 1974 album Back Home Again.

A version recorded live on August 26, 1974 at the Universal Amphitheatre in Los Angeles was included on his 1975 album An Evening with John Denver.

The live version was released as a single and went to No. 1 on both the Billboard magazine Hot Country Singles [2]and Billboard Hot 100 charts.[3] The song topped both charts for one week each, first the country chart (on May 31), and the Hot 100 chart a week later.

“Thank God I’m a Country Boy” was one of six songs released in 1975 that topped both the Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard Hot Country Singles charts. Denver’s two-sided hit “I’m Sorry”/”Calypso” also received that distinction.

Before the Next Teardrop Falls (song)

“Before the Next Teardrop Falls” is an American country and pop song written by Vivian Keith and Ben Peters, and most famously recorded by Freddy Fender.

The song was written in the late 1960s and had been recorded more than two dozen times. The song had achieved modest success in versions by various performers; the original version by Duane Dee reached #44 on the Billboard country chart in early 1968, and Linda Martell sent her version to #33 in early 1970. Jerry Lee Lewis recorded a version of the song on his 1969 album, Another Place Another Time.[1]

In 1974, record producer Huey P Meaux approached Fender about overdubbing vocals for an instrumental track. Fender agreed, performing the song bilingual style — singing the first verse in English, then repeating the verse in Spanish.

“The recording only took a few minutes,” Fender once told an interviewer. “I was glad to get it over with and I thought that would be the last of it.”[2]

However, “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” immediately took off in popularity when released to country radio in January 1975. The song ascended to #1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart in March, spending two weeks atop the chart.[3] Thereafter, the song caught on just as strongly at Top 40 radio stations and it was not long before Fender had a #1 Billboard Hot 100 hit as well. Billboard ranked it as the No. 4 song for 1975.

The song is about a man’s undaunted determination to save his heart for the just-departed object of his deep (but unrequited) love, and sincere hope that should the woman’s new relationship not work out, she will remember his love and return to him.

A showcase of Fender’s tenor and Meaux’s Tex-Mex musical styling, “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” jump-started his career. (Fender’s career had stalled in 1960 after his arrest on drug charges.)[4] In the months and years that followed, Fender recorded several bilingual standards which became major hits, most notably “Secret Love”.

BMI Songwriter Sterling Blythe claimed authorship and recalled having sold the rights to a portfolio of songs, among them “Before the Next Teardrop Falls”, for $4,500 to settle debts when he left Nashville for the West Coast prior to Fender’s recording.

Shining Star (Earth, Wind & Fire song)

“Shining Star” is a 1975 song by Earth, Wind & Fire from their album That’s the Way of the World. The song was written by Maurice White, Larry Dunn and Philip Bailey and produced by White. “Shining Star” was Earth, Wind & Fire’s first major hit, hitting No. 1 on both the U.S. Hot 100 and R&B charts from 1975.[1]

Shining Star is considered a prime example of funk music that attained mainstream success.[1] The concept for the song came to White while strolling at night during the band’s recording of “That’s the Way of the World”. He was inspired by looking up at the starry sky and took his ideas about the song to the other band members. The song is noted for the way the instruments drop out during the last repeated choruses with the group singing the final lines a cappella followed by the song’s abrupt end.[2]

He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You)

“He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You)” is a 1975 No. 1 song in the United States sung by Tony Orlando and Dawn. It topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart on May 3, 1975, and remained there for three weeks.[2] The song also went to No. 1 on the U.S. adult contemporary chart for one week in 1975.[3]

The original title of the song was “He Will Break Your Heart”. It was written by Jerry Butler, Calvin Carter, and Curtis Mayfield. The song was recorded by Butler and released as a single in 1960, where it peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In addition, Butler’s recording spent seven, non consecutive weeks at No. 1 on the U.S. R&B chart.[4] Subsequent cover versions of “He Will Break Your Heart” were released by artists such as The Righteous Brothers and Freddie Scott.[citation needed]

In the Jerry Butler version, before he connects the second verse into the third verse, he says “BUT WAIT.”

(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song

“(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song” is an American country and pop song made famous by B.J. Thomas. It won the 1976 Grammy Award for Best Country Song, awarded to its songwriters, Larry Butler and Chips Moman.

Bowing at #99 on the Hot 100 on February 1, 1975, the hit became Thomas’ second #1 single, on April 26, 1975. Including the parenthetical part, the title is the longest of any song to top the Hot 100. It also topped Billboard’s Easy Listening chart and was the last of his four Number Ones on that chart.[1] It also hit #1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart.[2] Billboard ranked it as the No. 17 song for 1975.[3]

Although he would not have any major country hits for another eight years, this hit paved the way for Thomas’ future success as a mainstream artist in that genre.

In 1976, the song was performed by the Muppets on The Muppet Show. In 1979 Larry Butler produced a cover version by Kenny Rogers and Dottie West for their album Classics. Alvin and the Chipmunks and Butler covered the song for the 1981 album Urban Chipmunk.

“(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song” was certified gold for sales of one million units by the Recording Industry Association of America.[4]

Philadelphia Freedom (song)

“Philadelphia Freedom” is a song released by The Elton John Band as a single in 1975. The song was the fourth of Elton John’s six number 1 US hits during the early and mid-1970s, which saw his recordings dominating the charts. In Canada it was his eighth single to hit the top of the RPM national singles chart.

The song was written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin as a favour to John’s friend, tennis star Billie Jean King. King was part of the Philadelphia Freedoms professional tennis team. The song features an orchestral arrangement by Gene Page, including flutes, horns, and strings.

The song made its album debut on 1977’s Elton John’s Greatest Hits Volume II. The unedited version (without an early fade out) appears only on the box set To Be Continued… and the remastered edition of the Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy album.

Lovin’ You

“Lovin’ You” is a 1975 hit single originally performed by American singer Minnie Riperton. The song became a #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 on April 5, 1975. Additionally, it reached #2 in the UK, and #3 on the R&B chart in the U.S. Billboard ranked it as the No. 13 song for 1975.[2] It is especially noteworthy for Riperton singing in the very high whistle register in the bridge of the song. It is also noteworthy for the sound of the chirping songbirds that are heard throughout the song.

Lady Marmalade

“Lady Marmalade” is a song written by Bob Crewe and Kenny Nolan. The song is famous for its sexually suggestive chorus of “Voulez-vous coucher avec moi (ce soir)?”, which translates into English as “Do you want to sleep with me (tonight)?” The song was originally recorded in 1974 by the group Eleventh Hour. It first became a popular hit in 1975 when covered by the American girl group Labelle. Labelle held the number-one spot on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for one week, and also topped the Canadian RPM national singles chart.

The song has had many cover versions over the years. In 1998, girl group All Saints released a cover of the song that peaked at number one on the UK Singles Chart. The 2001 version by singers Christina Aguilera, Mýa, Pink, and rapper Lil’ Kim, recorded for the Moulin Rouge! soundtrack was a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 for 5 weeks. “Lady Marmalade” was the ninth song to reach number one by two different musical acts in America.[3]

My Eyes Adored You

“My Eyes Adored You” (original working title, “Blue Eyes in Georgia”) is a popular song written by Bob Crewe and Kenny Nolan.[1] It was originally recorded by The Four Seasons in early 1974. After the Motown label balked at the idea of releasing it, the recording was sold to lead singer Frankie Valli for $4000. After rejections by Capitol, Atlantic, and other labels, Valli succeeded in getting the recording released on Private Stock Records, but the owner/founder of the label wanted only Valli’s name on the label. The single was released in the U.S. in November 1974 and topped the Billboard Hot 100 in March 1975.[1] “My Eyes Adored You” also went to number 2 on the Easy Listening chart.[2] Billboard ranked it as the No. 5 song for 1975.[3]

The single was Valli’s second number 1 hit as a solo artist, and remained there for one week, being knocked out of the top spot by another Crewe/Nolan-penned song, “Lady Marmalade”. Although it was released as a Valli solo effort, the song is sometimes included on Four Seasons compilation albums. It is from the album Closeup.

The success of “My Eyes Adored You” triggered a revival of interest in recordings by The Four Seasons. The band was subsequently signed to Warner Bros. Records as Valli’s follow-up single, “Swearin’ to God” was climbing to number 6 on the Hot 100.

Black Water (song)

“Black Water” is a song recorded by the American music group The Doobie Brothers from their 1974 album What Were Once Vices Are Now Habits: the track – which features its composer Patrick Simmons on lead vocals – became the first of the two Doobie Brothers’ #1 hit singles in the spring of 1975.

Patrick Simmons would recall that he chanced on the basic guitar lick for “Black Water” while at Warner Bros. Recording Studio (NoHo) for the recording sessions for the Doobie Brothers’ 1973 album The Captain and Me: “I was sitting out in the studio waiting between takes and I played that part. All the sudden I heard the talk-back go on and [producer] Ted Templeman says: ‘What is that?’ I said: ‘It’s just a little riff that I came up with that I’ve been tweaking with.’ He goes: ‘I love that. You really should write a song using that riff.'”[1]

Have You Never Been Mellow (song)

“Have You Never Been Mellow” is a popular song written by John Farrar and recorded by Olivia Newton-John as the title track for her album of the same name.

In March 1975, the single became Newton-John’s second consecutive number one hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and also topped the Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Singles chart.[1] “Have You Never Been Mellow” continued Newton-John’s success as a crossover artist when it peaked at No. 3 on the Hot Country Singles chart.[2]

The record also received a Grammy nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

In the United States, it was Newton-John’s fourth straight single to be certified gold for sales of one million copies.[3] “Have You Never Been Mellow” also reached number one in Canada and peaked at number 10 in Australia and number 26 in Japan, but was not much of a success elsewhere in the world, failing to chart altogether in the United Kingdom.

Best of My Love (Eagles song)

“Best of My Love” is a song written by Don Henley, Glenn Frey, and J. D. Souther. It was originally recorded by the Eagles (with Henley singing lead vocals), and included on their 1974 album On the Border. The song was released as the third single from the album, and it became the band’s first Billboard Hot 100 number 1 single in March 1975. The song also topped the easy listening (adult contemporary) chart for one week a month earlier.[2] Billboard ranked it as the number 12 song for 1975.[3]

Pick Up the Pieces (Average White Band song)

“Pick Up the Pieces” is a 1974 song by the Average White Band from their second album, AWB. On the single, songwriting credit was given to founding member and saxophonist Roger Ball and guitarist Hamish Stuart individually and the entire band collectively. It is essentially an instrumental, apart from the song’s title being shouted at several points in the song.

“Pick Up the Pieces” was released in the United Kingdom in July 1974 but failed to chart. When the album was released in the United States in October 1974, radio stations there started to play the song, and on 22 February 1975, it went to the top of the US singles chart and peaked at number five on the soul charts.[1] Billboard ranked it as the No. 20 song for 1975.[2] After its US success, the song charted in the UK and climbed to number six. “Pick Up the Pieces” also made it to number eleven on the US disco chart.[3]

You’re No Good

“You’re No Good” is a song written by Clint Ballard, Jr., first performed by Dee Dee Warwick for Jubilee Records in 1963 with production by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. It has since been covered by many artists, including charting versions by Betty Everett in 1963, The Swinging Blue Jeans in 1964, and Linda Ronstadt in 1975, whose version was a number 1 hit in the United States.

The song first became a hit in November 1963 when recorded by Betty Everett for Vee-Jay Records of Chicago. The single peaked at number 51 on the Billboard Hot 100, and at number 5 on “Cashbox’s R&B Locations” chart.[1]

Vee-Jay’s head a&r man Calvin Carter found the song while visiting New York City in search of material for his label’s roster and he originally intended to cut “You’re No Good” with Dee Clark but, he recalled: “when I went to rehearsal with the tune, it was so negative, I said, ‘Hey, guys don’t talk negative about girls, because girls are the record buyers. No, I better pass on that.’ So I gave the song to Betty Everett.” During the playback of Everett’s track her label-mates the Dells “were sitting on the wooden platform where the string players would sit… just stomping their feet on this wooden platform to the beat of the song as it was playing back… I told the engineer ‘Let’s do it again, and let’s mic those foot sounds, ’cause it really gave it a hell of a beat.’ So we did that, and boom, a hit.”[2]a

Fire (Ohio Players song)

“Fire” is a hit song by R&B/funk band Ohio Players. The song was the opening track from the album of the same name and hit #1 on both the Billboard Hot 100 (where it was succeeded by Linda Ronstadt’s “You’re No Good”) and the Hot Soul Singles chart in early 1975.[1] It spent five weeks atop the soul chart. “Fire” was the Ohio Players’ only entry on the new disco/dance chart, where it peaked at #10.[2] The tune is considered to be the band’s signature song along with “Love Rollercoaster.”

The song was recorded at Mercury Records’ Chicago-based studio. While performing it in California, the band let Stevie Wonder hear the basic track for the song and he predicted that it would become a big hit. The song is noted for its sound of a siren recorded from a fire truck, heard at the beginning, as well as in the instrumental break in the middle. The edit version avoided much of the repetition of the music.

A cover of the song was released by Canadian New Wave band Platinum Blonde on their third album Contact in 1987. Another cover, also from 1987, is featured on the album Rhythm Killers by Sly and Robbie, produced by Bill Laswell. For their 2014 album For the Love of Money, industrial hip hop outfit Tackhead covered the song.[3]

It is currently used as the theme song to the FOX reality series Hell’s Kitchen.

The guitar solo break was frequently used as an outro from the Top Ten segment by The CBS Orchestra on Late Show with David Letterman, with the song’s ending added during presentation of the Top Ten on Letterman’s final show in 2015.[4] It was also sampled for Da Lench Mob’s rap “You and Your Heroes” from Guerillas in tha Mist, and was referenced in the song “Sweet Revenge” by the Japanese pop group Dreams Come True.

The composer of Wild Cherry’s hit song “Play That Funky Music” has indicated that “Fire” was the inspiration.

Laughter in the Rain

“Laughter in the Rain” is a song recorded by Neil Sedaka, composed by him with lyrics by Phil Cody. It includes a 20-second saxophone solo by Jim Horn.[1] Cody reports writing the lyrics in about five minutes after smoking marijuana and falling asleep under a tree for a couple of hours.[2]

In the USA, “Laughter in the Rain” reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on February 1, 1975 (it was his first single to top the Hot 100 since 1962).[3] The song spent two weeks at the top of the adult contemporary chart.

The song was likewise a major hit in Canada, reaching number two on the pop singles chart and number one on the Adult Contemporary chart. The song was also released in the UK where it spent nine weeks on the Singles Chart, peaking at No. 15 on June 22, 1974.[4]

Please Mr. Postman

“Please Mr. Postman” is a song written by Georgia Dobbins, William Garrett, Freddie Gorman, Brian Holland, and Robert Bateman. It is the debut single by the Marvelettes for the Tamla (Motown) label,[1] notable as the first Motown song to reach the number-one position on the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart. The single achieved this position in late 1961; it hit number one on the R&B chart as well.[2] “Please Mr. Postman” became a number-one hit again in early 1975 when the Carpenters’ cover of the song reached the top position of the Billboard Hot 100. “Please Mr. Postman” has been covered several times, including a 1963 version by the English rock group the Beatles.

Mandy (English and Kerr song)

“Mandy”, originally titled “Brandy”, is a song written and composed by Scott English and Richard Kerr.[1]

“Brandy” was a hit in 1971 for Scott English in the UK and in 1972 for Bunny Walters in New Zealand, but achieved greater success when covered in 1974 by Barry Manilow in the US with the title changed to from “Brandy” to “Mandy” to avoid confusion with Looking Glass’s “Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)”. His version reached the top of the US Hot 100 Singles Chart. Later on, it was recorded by many other artists. Irish boyband Westlife had a UK number one with their version in 2003.

Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds

“Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” is a song written primarily by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney,[1] for the Beatles’ 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.[2] Lennon’s son Julian inspired the song with a nursery school drawing he called “Lucy—in the sky with diamonds”. Shortly after the song’s release, speculation arose that the first letter of each of the title nouns intentionally spelled LSD.[3] Lennon consistently denied this,[3][4] insisting the song was inspired by Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland books,[3] a claim repeatedly confirmed by Paul McCartney.[5][6][7]

Despite persistent rumours, the song was never officially banned by the BBC,[8][9][10][11] and aired contemporaneously on BBC Radio at least once, on 20 May 1967.[12]

Scroll To Top