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Rock’n Me

“Rock’n Me” (also known as “Rock ‘N Me”) is a song by American rock group Steve Miller Band, written by the group’s leader Steve Miller.[2] The song was released as the second single from the group’s ninth studio album Fly Like an Eagle in 1976; Miller also produced the song and album as well as performed on it.[3] The North American release of the single was generally credited to Steve Miller as a person, while the European release was generally credited to the Steve Miller Band as a whole group.

The single achieved lasting commercial and critical success, with the publication Billboard labeling it “an immediate audience grabber”.[3] It became the band’s second #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100, where it stayed at the top for one week,[4] and it also topped the RPM Top Singles chart in Canada.[5] In later years, the song has been included in several compilation albums such as 1978’s Greatest Hits 1974-78 and 1991’s The Very Best of the Steve Miller Band.[2]

Miller has acknowledged that elements of “Rock’n Me”, particularly the intro, was a tip of the hat to British group Free’s “All Right Now”. He stated, “Yeah, it’s a tack on the wall for Paul (Kossoff). I did one concert in the two years that I was off the road. I went to London and played with Pink Floyd… it was a big, huge outdoor show so we needed a big rock and roll number that was really going to excite everybody. I just put it together and didn’t think much about it.”[3]

Composed for that kind of pop and rock festival atmosphere,[3] the lyrics and vocals have been labeled as having an ‘every man’ quality to them.[2] It is sung from the point of view of someone frequently traveling while keeping a positive, upbeat attitude. Locations mentioned in the song include the major cities of Phoenix, Arizona, Tacoma, Washington, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Atlanta, Georgia, and Los Angeles, California.

The song is a playable track on the video game Rock Band 2, and featured in Grand Theft Auto V and Tap Tap Revenge 3 for iOS.

If You Leave Me Now

“If You Leave Me Now” is the title of a popular hit ballad by the American rock group Chicago, from their album Chicago X. It was written and sung by bass guitar player Peter Cetera and released as a single on July 31, 1976.

It is also the title of a compilation album released by Columbia Records (Columbia 38590) in 1983.

The single topped the US charts on October 23, 1976, and stayed there for two weeks, making it the first number one hit for the group as well as hitting number one on the Easy Listening charts.[4] It also reached number one in the UK on November 13, 1976, maintaining the position for three weeks.[5]

“If You Leave Me Now” was also Chicago’s biggest hit worldwide, topping the charts in other countries such as Australia. It won Grammy Awards for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) and Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus. It also received a nomination for Record of the Year. In addition, by August 1978 it had sold 1.4 million copies in the United States alone.[6]

The song has been featured in several television series and movies such as Three Kings, Shaun of the Dead, A Lot Like Love, Sex and the City, Happy Feet, South Park, and the video game Grand Theft Auto V.

For the past several years Chicago has teamed with the American Cancer Society and offered the opportunity to bid on the chance to sing their hit, “If You Leave Me Now” with them on stage live at their concerts. Proceeds go to the American Cancer Society to fight breast cancer.

Disco Duck

“Disco Duck” is a satirical disco novelty song performed by Rick Dees and His Cast of Idiots. At the time, Dees was a Memphis disc jockey. It became a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week in October 1976 (and ranked #99 out of the 100 most popular songs of the year according to Billboard magazine). It also made the top 20 on the Billboard Hot Soul Singles chart, peaking at number 15. “Disco Duck” was initially released in the south by Estelle Axton’s Fretone label, but it was later released by RSO Records for national and international distribution.

A Fifth of Beethoven

“A Fifth of Beethoven” is a disco instrumental recorded by Walter Murphy and the Big Apple Band. It was adapted by Murphy from the first movement of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. The record was produced by noted production music and sound effects recording producer Thomas J. Valentino.[2] It was one of the most popular and memorable pieces of music from the disco era. The “Fifth” in the song’s title is a pun, referencing a liquid measure approximately equal to one-fifth of a gallon, a popular size for bottles containing hard liquor, as well as Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony from which the song was adapted.

The song, when released, entered the Billboard Hot 100 at number 80 on May 29, 1976, and took 19 weeks to reach number 1, where it stayed for one week becoming Murphy’s best known work and his only Top 40 hit. Early in 1977, it was licensed to RSO Records for inclusion on the soundtrack to the movie Saturday Night Fever.

Even though Murphy played nearly every instrument on the instrumental, his record company cautioned that the record would stand a better chance if credited to a group rather than an individual. To Murphy’s annoyance, they came up with the name Walter Murphy and the Big Apple Band, only to discover two days after its release that there was already a Big Apple Band. The name on the label was changed to The Walter Murphy Band and then simply to Walter Murphy.

Play That Funky Music

“Play That Funky Music” is a song written by Rob Parissi and recorded by the band Wild Cherry. The performers on the classic recording included the members of the band at the time: lead singer Parissi, guitarist Bryan Bassett, bassist Allen Wentz and drummer Ron Beitle, with session players Chuck Berginc, Ian Bridle (keyboard and backing vocals) Jack Brndiar (trumpets) and Joe Eckert and Rick Singer (saxes) on the horn riff that runs throughout the track’s verses. The single hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on September 18, 1976, and was also number one on the Hot Soul Singles chart.[3] The single was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for shipments of over 2 million records, eventually selling 2.5 million in the United States alone.[4]

The song listed at no. 73 on Billboard’s Greatest Songs of All Time.[5]

(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty

“(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” is a song recorded and released in 1976 by KC and the Sunshine Band for the album Part 3. The song became their third number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as their third number-one on the Hot Soul Singles chart.[2] The song was met with a degree of controversy, since the lyrics were interpreted or likely speculated by many as having sexual connotations. However, according to KC, it had a lot more meaning and depth. During his performance he would witness the entire crowd having a good time except for some minority. The song inspired people to “get off their can and get out there and do it”.[3] The B-side of Shake Your Booty was “Boogie Shoes”, which later became a hit on its own when it appeared on the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack in 1977.

“(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” holds the record for being the only number-one song title with a word repeated more than three times in it. The chorus consists of the title expression with the word “shake” appearing eight times.

You Should Be Dancing

“You Should Be Dancing” is a song by the Bee Gees, from the album Children of the World, released in 1976. It hit No. 1 for one week on the American Billboard Hot 100, No. 1 for seven weeks on the US Hot Dance Club Play chart, and in September the same year, reached No. 5 on the UK Singles Chart.[3] The song also peaked at No. 4 on the Billboard Soul chart. It was this song that first launched the Bee Gees into disco. It was also the only track from the group to top the dance chart.

It is also one of six songs performed by the Bee Gees included in the Saturday Night Fever movie soundtrack which came out a year later.

Don’t Go Breaking My Heart

“Don’t Go Breaking My Heart” is a duet by Elton John and Kiki Dee. It was written by Elton John with Bernie Taupin under the pseudonyms “Ann Orson” and “Carte Blanche” (a pun on the expression “an horse and cart, blanche”), respectively, and intended as an affectionate pastiche of the Motown style, notably the various duets recorded by Marvin Gaye and singers such as Tammi Terrell and Kim Weston. It is not to be confused with the Burt Bacharach/Hal David song of the same title recorded in 1965 by Dionne Warwick for the album Here I Am.

John and Taupin originally intended to record the song with Dusty Springfield, but ultimately withdrew the offer; Dusty’s partner Sue Cameron later said this was because she was too ill at the time.[1]

Kiss and Say Goodbye

“Kiss and Say Goodbye” is a song recorded by the American R&B vocal group The Manhattans. It was one of the biggest hits of 1976.

The song was written by Manhattans member Winfred “Blue” Lovett. The lyrics and melody came to him late one night. As he later recalled, “Everything was there. I got up about three o’clock in the morning and jotted down the things I wanted to say. I just put the words together on my tape recorder and little piano. I’ve always thought that when you write slow songs, they have to have meaning. In this case, it’s the love triangle situation we’ve all been through. I figured anyone who’s been in love could relate to it. And it seemed to touch home for a lot of folks.”[1]

Lovett originally considered the song a country tune more appropriate to be sung by Glen Campbell or Charley Pride. He decided to do it with his group and sing background on it.

The original demo of the song was recorded with The Manhattans backing band, “Little Harlem.” After hearing a tape of the recording, producer/arranger Bobby Martin decided to re-record the song with MFSB at Sigma Sound Studios in Philadelphia. Recorded in early 1975, Columbia Records officials withheld releasing the song until 14 months later. Lovett had his concerns over when the record came out as well as the record itself. “I was critical, a perfectionist in the studio, and there are still parts of it that make my skin crawl. For example, in one place, the background vocals go off pitch. Somehow, though, that didn’t seem to bother anyone else.”[2]

Afternoon Delight

“Afternoon Delight” is a song recorded by Starland Vocal Band, featuring close harmony and sexually suggestive wordplay. It was written by Bill Danoff, one of the members of the band. It became a #1 U.S. Hot 100 single on July 10, 1976.[2] It became a gold record.

“Afternoon Delight” also reached #1 in Canada and peaked at #5 in New Zealand. In Australia it was a #6 hit. (Adelaide radio station 5KA was first to pick up the single, making it #1 in South Australia.) In the UK, it reached #18 and was used as theme to a weekly show of the same title on London’s Capital Radio, hosted by Duncan Johnson.

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