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Rock’n Me

“Rock’n Me” (also known as “Rock ‘N Me”) is a song by American rock group Steve Miller Band, written by the group’s leader Steve Miller.[2] The song was released as the second single from the group’s ninth studio album Fly Like an Eagle in 1976; Miller also produced the song and album as well as performed on it.[3] The North American release of the single was generally credited to Steve Miller as a person, while the European release was generally credited to the Steve Miller Band as a whole group.

The single achieved lasting commercial and critical success, with the publication Billboard labeling it “an immediate audience grabber”.[3] It became the band’s second #1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100, where it stayed at the top for one week,[4] and it also topped the RPM Top Singles chart in Canada.[5] In later years, the song has been included in several compilation albums such as 1978’s Greatest Hits 1974-78 and 1991’s The Very Best of the Steve Miller Band.[2]

Miller has acknowledged that elements of “Rock’n Me”, particularly the intro, was a tip of the hat to British group Free’s “All Right Now”. He stated, “Yeah, it’s a tack on the wall for Paul (Kossoff). I did one concert in the two years that I was off the road. I went to London and played with Pink Floyd… it was a big, huge outdoor show so we needed a big rock and roll number that was really going to excite everybody. I just put it together and didn’t think much about it.”[3]

Composed for that kind of pop and rock festival atmosphere,[3] the lyrics and vocals have been labeled as having an ‘every man’ quality to them.[2] It is sung from the point of view of someone frequently traveling while keeping a positive, upbeat attitude. Locations mentioned in the song include the major cities of Phoenix, Arizona, Tacoma, Washington, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Atlanta, Georgia, and Los Angeles, California.

The song is a playable track on the video game Rock Band 2, and featured in Grand Theft Auto V and Tap Tap Revenge 3 for iOS.

If You Leave Me Now

“If You Leave Me Now” is the title of a popular hit ballad by the American rock group Chicago, from their album Chicago X. It was written and sung by bass guitar player Peter Cetera and released as a single on July 31, 1976.

It is also the title of a compilation album released by Columbia Records (Columbia 38590) in 1983.

The single topped the US charts on October 23, 1976, and stayed there for two weeks, making it the first number one hit for the group as well as hitting number one on the Easy Listening charts.[4] It also reached number one in the UK on November 13, 1976, maintaining the position for three weeks.[5]

“If You Leave Me Now” was also Chicago’s biggest hit worldwide, topping the charts in other countries such as Australia. It won Grammy Awards for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) and Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus. It also received a nomination for Record of the Year. In addition, by August 1978 it had sold 1.4 million copies in the United States alone.[6]

The song has been featured in several television series and movies such as Three Kings, Shaun of the Dead, A Lot Like Love, Sex and the City, Happy Feet, South Park, and the video game Grand Theft Auto V.

For the past several years Chicago has teamed with the American Cancer Society and offered the opportunity to bid on the chance to sing their hit, “If You Leave Me Now” with them on stage live at their concerts. Proceeds go to the American Cancer Society to fight breast cancer.

Disco Duck

“Disco Duck” is a satirical disco novelty song performed by Rick Dees and His Cast of Idiots. At the time, Dees was a Memphis disc jockey. It became a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week in October 1976 (and ranked #99 out of the 100 most popular songs of the year according to Billboard magazine). It also made the top 20 on the Billboard Hot Soul Singles chart, peaking at number 15. “Disco Duck” was initially released in the south by Estelle Axton’s Fretone label, but it was later released by RSO Records for national and international distribution.

A Fifth of Beethoven

“A Fifth of Beethoven” is a disco instrumental recorded by Walter Murphy and the Big Apple Band. It was adapted by Murphy from the first movement of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. The record was produced by noted production music and sound effects recording producer Thomas J. Valentino.[2] It was one of the most popular and memorable pieces of music from the disco era. The “Fifth” in the song’s title is a pun, referencing a liquid measure approximately equal to one-fifth of a gallon, a popular size for bottles containing hard liquor, as well as Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony from which the song was adapted.

The song, when released, entered the Billboard Hot 100 at number 80 on May 29, 1976, and took 19 weeks to reach number 1, where it stayed for one week becoming Murphy’s best known work and his only Top 40 hit. Early in 1977, it was licensed to RSO Records for inclusion on the soundtrack to the movie Saturday Night Fever.

Even though Murphy played nearly every instrument on the instrumental, his record company cautioned that the record would stand a better chance if credited to a group rather than an individual. To Murphy’s annoyance, they came up with the name Walter Murphy and the Big Apple Band, only to discover two days after its release that there was already a Big Apple Band. The name on the label was changed to The Walter Murphy Band and then simply to Walter Murphy.

Play That Funky Music

“Play That Funky Music” is a song written by Rob Parissi and recorded by the band Wild Cherry. The performers on the classic recording included the members of the band at the time: lead singer Parissi, guitarist Bryan Bassett, bassist Allen Wentz and drummer Ron Beitle, with session players Chuck Berginc, Ian Bridle (keyboard and backing vocals) Jack Brndiar (trumpets) and Joe Eckert and Rick Singer (saxes) on the horn riff that runs throughout the track’s verses. The single hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on September 18, 1976, and was also number one on the Hot Soul Singles chart.[3] The single was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for shipments of over 2 million records, eventually selling 2.5 million in the United States alone.[4]

The song listed at no. 73 on Billboard’s Greatest Songs of All Time.[5]

(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty

“(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” is a song recorded and released in 1976 by KC and the Sunshine Band for the album Part 3. The song became their third number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as their third number-one on the Hot Soul Singles chart.[2] The song was met with a degree of controversy, since the lyrics were interpreted or likely speculated by many as having sexual connotations. However, according to KC, it had a lot more meaning and depth. During his performance he would witness the entire crowd having a good time except for some minority. The song inspired people to “get off their can and get out there and do it”.[3] The B-side of Shake Your Booty was “Boogie Shoes”, which later became a hit on its own when it appeared on the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack in 1977.

“(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” holds the record for being the only number-one song title with a word repeated more than three times in it. The chorus consists of the title expression with the word “shake” appearing eight times.

You Should Be Dancing

“You Should Be Dancing” is a song by the Bee Gees, from the album Children of the World, released in 1976. It hit No. 1 for one week on the American Billboard Hot 100, No. 1 for seven weeks on the US Hot Dance Club Play chart, and in September the same year, reached No. 5 on the UK Singles Chart.[3] The song also peaked at No. 4 on the Billboard Soul chart. It was this song that first launched the Bee Gees into disco. It was also the only track from the group to top the dance chart.

It is also one of six songs performed by the Bee Gees included in the Saturday Night Fever movie soundtrack which came out a year later.

Don’t Go Breaking My Heart

“Don’t Go Breaking My Heart” is a duet by Elton John and Kiki Dee. It was written by Elton John with Bernie Taupin under the pseudonyms “Ann Orson” and “Carte Blanche” (a pun on the expression “an horse and cart, blanche”), respectively, and intended as an affectionate pastiche of the Motown style, notably the various duets recorded by Marvin Gaye and singers such as Tammi Terrell and Kim Weston. It is not to be confused with the Burt Bacharach/Hal David song of the same title recorded in 1965 by Dionne Warwick for the album Here I Am.

John and Taupin originally intended to record the song with Dusty Springfield, but ultimately withdrew the offer; Dusty’s partner Sue Cameron later said this was because she was too ill at the time.[1]

Kiss and Say Goodbye

“Kiss and Say Goodbye” is a song recorded by the American R&B vocal group The Manhattans. It was one of the biggest hits of 1976.

The song was written by Manhattans member Winfred “Blue” Lovett. The lyrics and melody came to him late one night. As he later recalled, “Everything was there. I got up about three o’clock in the morning and jotted down the things I wanted to say. I just put the words together on my tape recorder and little piano. I’ve always thought that when you write slow songs, they have to have meaning. In this case, it’s the love triangle situation we’ve all been through. I figured anyone who’s been in love could relate to it. And it seemed to touch home for a lot of folks.”[1]

Lovett originally considered the song a country tune more appropriate to be sung by Glen Campbell or Charley Pride. He decided to do it with his group and sing background on it.

The original demo of the song was recorded with The Manhattans backing band, “Little Harlem.” After hearing a tape of the recording, producer/arranger Bobby Martin decided to re-record the song with MFSB at Sigma Sound Studios in Philadelphia. Recorded in early 1975, Columbia Records officials withheld releasing the song until 14 months later. Lovett had his concerns over when the record came out as well as the record itself. “I was critical, a perfectionist in the studio, and there are still parts of it that make my skin crawl. For example, in one place, the background vocals go off pitch. Somehow, though, that didn’t seem to bother anyone else.”[2]

Afternoon Delight

“Afternoon Delight” is a song recorded by Starland Vocal Band, featuring close harmony and sexually suggestive wordplay. It was written by Bill Danoff, one of the members of the band. It became a #1 U.S. Hot 100 single on July 10, 1976.[2] It became a gold record.

“Afternoon Delight” also reached #1 in Canada and peaked at #5 in New Zealand. In Australia it was a #6 hit. (Adelaide radio station 5KA was first to pick up the single, making it #1 in South Australia.) In the UK, it reached #18 and was used as theme to a weekly show of the same title on London’s Capital Radio, hosted by Duncan Johnson.

Love Hangover

“Love Hangover” was the fourth number one single for Motown singer Diana Ross. Ross recorded “Love Hangover” in 1975. It was released in March 1976, and rose to number one on the Billboard Hot 100, Hot Soul Singles and Hot Dance Club Play charts simultaneously.

The song was written by Pamela Sawyer and Marilyn McLeod as a disco number. Producer Hal Davis recorded the instrumental track in 1975 thinking it ideal for Marvin Gaye or Diana Ross, who were his two favorite vocalists to work with. He thought Diana would be sexier on it, so he recorded the song with her. Background vocals on the track were provided by Motown’s in-house trio, The Andantes. Studio musicians included James Gadson on drums, Henry E. Davis (of the band L.T.D.) on bass, and Joe Sample on keyboards.[1]

Hal Davis instructed the song’s engineer Russ Terrana to install a strobe light so that Ross could be in the “disco” mindset.[2] As the song changed from ballad to uptempo, Ross became more comfortable with the material; she hummed, sang bit parts, laughed, danced around and even imitated Billie Holiday.[3] The carefree and sensual nature of Ross’ vocals and the music’s direction helped to sell the song.

The song was released on the Diana Ross LP in February, 1976. The lead single from the album was “I Thought It Took A Little Time.” Singing group The 5th Dimension also released “Love Hangover” as a single. Motown then issued Ross’ version on 45. Both versions entered the chart the same day. By the time Ross’ version of “Love Hangover” went to number one, Ross had reinvented herself as a disco diva and The 5th Dimension’s version had peaked at number 80. It won Ross a Grammy nomination for Best R&B Female Vocal Performance.

“Love Hangover” reached number one on May 29, 1976. That week, Casey Kasem reported on American Top 40 that with that song Diana had broken the record for the most number-one hits by a female vocalist. With her fourth number-one, she surpassed Connie Francis, Helen Reddy, Roberta Flack, and Cher, all of whom were tied with three each. During the ’80s, Ross went on to score two more number-one hits, making six, establishing her record for 12 years. Whitney Houston would break it in 1988 and Madonna in 1990. But counting 12 number-one hits as lead singer of The Supremes, Ross’s grand total is 18, a feat equalled only by Mariah Carey as of 2016.

Silly Love Songs

“Silly Love Songs” is a song written by Paul McCartney and performed by Wings. The song appears on the 1976 album Wings at the Speed of Sound. It was also released as a single in 1976, backed with “Cook of the House”. The song, written in response to music critics accusing him of writing only “silly love songs”, also features disco overtones.

“Silly Love Songs” was written as a rebuttal to music critics, as well as former Beatle and friend, John Lennon, accusing Paul McCartney of writing lightweight love songs.[3] Author Tim Riley suggests that in the song, McCartney is inviting “his audience to have a laugh on him,” as Elvis Presley had sometimes done.[4]

But over the years people have said, “Aw, he sings love songs, he writes love songs, he’s so soppy at times.” I thought, Well, I know what they mean, but, people have been doing love songs forever. I like ’em, other people like ’em, and there’s a lot of people I love — I’m lucky enough to have that in my life. So the idea was that “you” may call them silly, but what’s wrong with that?

 

The song was, in a way, to answer people who just accuse me of being soppy. The nice payoff now is that a lot of the people I meet who are at the age where they’ve just got a couple of kids and have grown up a bit, settling down, they’ll say to me, “I thought you were really soppy for years, but I get it now! I see what you were doing!”

 

By the way, “Silly Love Songs” also had a good bassline and worked well live.

— Paul McCartney, Billboard[5]

McCartney allowed the horn section to create their own parts for the song.[6]

Boogie Fever

“Boogie Fever” is a song recorded by Los Angeles, California-based R&B group The Sylvers, from their 1975 album Showcase. Their most lucrative single, it reached number one in the US on both the Billboard Hot 100 and Hot Soul Singles charts as well as reaching number one in Canada on the RPM national singles chart in 1976.[1] It was their third of nine Top 20 R&B hits and first top 40 pop single.[2] Billboard ranked it as the No. 20 song for 1976.[3] “Boogie Fever” is one of two gold records by the Sylvers, the other being “Hot Line”.

Welcome Back (John Sebastian song)

“Welcome Back” is a popular record that was the theme song of the 1970s American television sitcom Welcome Back, Kotter. Written and recorded by former Lovin’ Spoonful frontman John Sebastian, it reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for one week in May 1976 after only five weeks on the chart, and also topped the adult contemporary chart.[1] (The show itself had become an instant ratings success upon its premiere the previous fall.) It also reached #93 on the country chart.

Let Your Love Flow

“Let Your Love Flow” is the title of a pop song written by Larry E. Williams, a former roadie for Neil Diamond,[1] and made popular by the American country music duo The Bellamy Brothers. Diamond was initially offered the opportunity to record the song, but he declined. The song was first recorded by Gene Cotton prior to the Bellamy Brothers, but Cotton never secured the rights.

The song was a crossover hit in the United States, reaching Number One on the 1976 Billboard Hot 100 charts, #2 on Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks, and #21 on Hot Country Singles. It was also an international hit, landing on the charts in the UK, Scandinavia and West Germany,[2] where the Bellamy Brothers’ record spent five weeks at #1. In 2008, the song re-entered the UK Singles Chart following its appearance in an advertisement in the United Kingdom for Barclaycard, where it peaked at #21.

In other media, it was used in the 1980 Tatum O’Neal film Little Darlings, the 2008 period drama Swingtown, and season 2 episode ‘No Room at the Inn’ of the HBO series The Leftovers.

The song has been covered by numerous other artists, most notably Joan Baez, who included it on her 1979 Honest Lullaby album. Another re-recording by the Bellamy brothers with Gölä is included on the album The Greatest Hits Sessions. “Ein Bett im Kornfeld”, a German language adaptation of the song recorded by Jürgen Drews, spent eleven weeks at #1 in West Germany in 1976.[3]

Disco Lady

“Disco Lady” is a 1976 single for Johnnie Taylor that went on to become his biggest hit. It spent four weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and six weeks on the Billboard R&B chart in the U.S. It was also the first single to be certified platinum by the RIAA;[1] ultimately it sold over 2.5 million copies.[2] Billboard ranked it as the No. 3 song for 1976.[3]

The single was Taylor’s first for Columbia Records, where Taylor signed after his long-time label, Stax Records, went bankrupt. The song was produced by Taylor’s long-time producer, Don Davis.[4] Among the guests on the song were four members of Parliament-Funkadelic: bassist Bootsy Collins, keyboardist Bernie Worrell, guitarist Glenn Goins, drummer Jerome Brailey, and Dawn’s Telma Hopkins.

“Disco Lady” was the first Hot 100 number-one hit with the word “disco” in its title, though there had been several disco songs that had already reached number one. The single also reached #25 on the UK Singles Chart.[5]

During the 1980s, the song “Disco Lady” was spoofed in a popular PSA for the American Cancer Society in a promotion called “Dragon Lady.” (The “Dragon Lady” in the commercial was played by a teen-aged Robin Givens, who turned off all of her peers by her excessive smoking.)

The song is featured in a first season episode of That 70s Show and later Eric repeatedly sings the chorus of the song to appease a drunken Donna.

December, 1963 (Oh, What a Night)

“December, 1963 (Oh, What a Night)” is a song by the Four Seasons, written by original Four Seasons keyboard player Bob Gaudio and his future wife Judy Parker, produced by Gaudio, and included on the group’s album, Who Loves You (1975).

The song features drummer Gerry Polci on lead vocals, with the usual lead Frankie Valli singing the bridge sections and backing vocals, and bass player Don Ciccone (former lead singer of The Critters) singing the falsetto part (And I felt a rush like a rolling bolt of thunder / Spinning my head around and taking my body under).

Love Machine (The Miracles song)

“Love Machine” is a 1975 single recorded by Motown group The Miracles, taken from their album City of Angels. This song was a #1 Pop smash on the Billboard Hot 100, and the biggest-selling hit single of The Miracles’ career. This single was one of two Billboard Hot 100 Top 20 hits recorded by The Miracles with Billy Griffin as lead vocalist; the other is 1973’s “Do It Baby”. Griffin had replaced Miracles founder Smokey Robinson as lead singer in 1972. The song features a growling vocal by Miracle Bobby Rogers, with group baritone Ronnie White repeating “Yeah Baby” throughout the song.

Theme from S.W.A.T.

“Theme from S.W.A.T.” is an instrumental song written by Barry De Vorzon and performed by American funk group Rhythm Heritage, released on their debut album Disco-Fied. It reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the United States on the chart date of February 28, 1976.

As the title implies, it was the opening theme music for the 1970s American television series S.W.A.T., though it is a noticeably different recording from the actual TV theme version. The theme song was also referenced by characters in the 2003 motion picture of the same name, who mouth the notes during a party to celebrate their successful completion of the training course.

It remains one of a handful of TV themes to top the Billboard Hot 100, a list that includes “Welcome Back” by John Sebastian, “Miami Vice Theme” by Jan Hammer and “How Do You Talk To An Angel” by The Heights.

50 Ways to Leave Your Lover

“50 Ways to Leave Your Lover” is a song by the American singer-songwriter Paul Simon. It was the second single from his fourth studio album, Still Crazy After All These Years (1975), released on Columbia Records. Backing vocals on the single were performed by Patti Austin, Valerie Simpson, and Phoebe Snow.[1] The song features a recognizable repeated drum riff performed by drummer Steve Gadd.

One of his most popular singles, “50 Ways” was released in December 1975 and began to see chart success within the new year. It became Simon’s sole number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, and was his highest position in France, where it peaked at number two. Elsewhere, the song was a top 20 hit in Canada and New Zealand. The single was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), denoting sales of over one million copies.

Love Rollercoaster

“Love Rollercoaster” is a song by American funk/R&B band Ohio Players, originally featured on their 1975 album Honey. It was composed by Beck, Bonner, Jones, Middlebrooks, Pierce, Satchell, and Williams.[1] It was a number-one U.S. hit in January 1976, and became a Gold record. In Canada, the song spent two weeks at number two.[2]

The song uses the roller coaster, a common theme park attraction, as a metaphor for the ups and downs of dating and romantic relationships. The roller coaster metaphor is also suggested musically as the guitarist plays a funk riff which slides up and back down repeatedly throughout the song, from the key of C down to the key of A and back up to the key of C.

Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To)

“Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To)” is a song written by Michael Masser and Gerald Goffin, and recorded by American singers Thelma Houston in 1973, and most notably Diana Ross as the theme to the 1975 Motown/Paramount film Mahogany.[1]

Produced by Masser, the song is a ballad that portrays its protagonist (Ross) as a black woman who becomes a successful Rome fashion designer.[citation needed]

Recorded with a full orchestral accompaniment, “Theme from Mahogany” became one of the most recognizable elements of the film, receiving praise from many critics.

Later released as a single, “Theme from Mahogany” became a number-one hit on both the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and the Easy Listening charts.[2]

The song was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Song. Ross performed the song live at the Academy Awards ceremony via satellite from the Netherlands.

I Write the Songs

“I Write the Songs” is a popular song written by Bruce Johnston in 1975 and made famous by Barry Manilow. Manilow’s version reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in January 1976[1] after spending two weeks atop the Billboard adult contemporary chart in December 1975.[2] It won a Grammy Award for Song of the Year and was nominated for Record of the Year in 1977.[2] Billboard ranked it as the No. 13 song of 1976.[3]

The original version was recorded by The Captain & Tennille, who worked with Johnston in the early 1970s with The Beach Boys. It appears on their 1975 album, Love Will Keep Us Together. The first release of I Write the Songs as a single was by then teen-idol David Cassidy from his 1975 solo album The Higher They Climb, which was also produced by Bruce Johnston. Cassidy’s version reached #11 on the UK Singles Chart in August of that year.[4]

Johnston has stated that, for him, the “I” in the song is God,[1] and that songs come from the spirit of creativity in all of us. He has said that the song is not about his Beach Boys bandmate Brian Wilson.[5]

Manilow was initially reluctant to record the song, stating in his autobiography Sweet Life: “The problem with the song was that if you didn’t listen carefully to the lyric, you would think that the singer was singing about himself. It could be misinterpreted as a monumental ego trip.”[2] After persuasion by Clive Davis, then president of Arista Records, Manilow recorded the song, and his version of “I Write the Songs” was the first single taken from the album Tryin’ to Get the Feeling. It first charted on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 15, 1975, reaching the top of the chart nine weeks later, on January 17, 1976.

Convoy (song)

“Convoy” is a 1975 novelty song performed by C. W. McCall (pseudonym of Bill Fries) that became a number-one song on both the country and pop charts in the US. Written by McCall and Chip Davis, the song spent six weeks at number one on the country charts [1] and one week at number one on the pop charts. The song went to number one in Canada as well, hitting the top of the RPM Top Singles Chart on January 24, 1976.[2] “Convoy” further peaked at number two in the UK. The song capitalized on the fad for citizens band (CB) radio. The song was the inspiration for the 1978 Sam Peckinpah film Convoy. The song is also in the video game’s soundtrack on the in-game radio station, Rebel Radio from the 2013 video game Grand Theft Auto V, and Disney Channel (including Disney Channel Asia), a basic cable and satellite television network that is owned by Disney Channels Worldwide, a unit of the Disney–ABC Television Group.

Saturday Night (Bay City Rollers song)

“Saturday Night” is a song recorded by the Scottish pop rock band Bay City Rollers. It was written and produced by Bill Martin and Phil Coulter. The tune is an upbeat pop rock number with a memorable hook: the word “Saturday” spelled out in a rhythmic chant.

The original version of the song was recorded and released in the UK in 1973, but did not hit the charts. The original version was sung by Nobby Clark. At the end of 1975, Saturday Night was released In America and it hit the no. 1 spot in January 1976. It was the first Billboard #1 of the US Bicentennial year. The song had been re-recorded for the Rollers’ 1974 UK album Rollin’ with lead vocals by Les McKeown, Nobby’s replacement. The single also reached number one on the RPM Canadian Singles Chart listing on 10 January 1976.[1] This is the band’s sole No. 1 hit in the United States

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