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You Light Up My Life (song)

“You Light Up My Life” is a ballad written by Joseph “Joe” Brooks, and originally recorded by Kasey Cisyk for the soundtrack album to the 1977 film of the same name.[1] The song was lip synched in the film by its lead actress, Didi Conn. The best-known version of the song is a cover by Debby Boone, the daughter of singer Pat Boone, which held the #1 position on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for ten consecutive weeks in 1977, setting a new record for that time.

Star Wars Theme/Cantina Band

“Star Wars Theme/Cantina Band” is a disco single recorded by Meco, taken from the album Star Wars and Other Galactic Funk. It hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on October 1, 1977, holding on to the spot for two weeks[1] and peaked at no. 7 on the UK Singles Chart, remaining in the charts for nine weeks.[2] To date it is the biggest-selling instrumental single in the history of recorded music, having sold two million units, being the only one ever to be certified Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.[3]

In the late 1970s CBS Sports used the song as opening music for its NFL coverage.

Best of My Love (The Emotions song)

“Best of My Love” is a 1977 song by the American band The Emotions. Released as a single on June 9, 1977 from their album Rejoice, the song was composed by Maurice White and Al McKay of Earth, Wind & Fire. Earth, Wind & Fire would later team up with the Emotions for the 1979 hit “Boogie Wonderland”. “Best of My Love” won a Grammy for Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal and also won an American Music Award for Favourite Soul/R&B Single.[1][2]

The song was listed at #87 on The Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Songs.[3] and it was the third biggest Pop song of 1977 and the fifth biggest R&B song of 1977.[4][5] “Best of My Love” has been certified platinum in the US by the (RIAA) and silver in the UK by the British Phonographic Industry.[6] Recent reviews have been largely positive, and the song continues to appear on “Best of the ’70s” lists.[7][8]

I Just Want to Be Your Everything

“I Just Want to Be Your Everything” is a song recorded by Andy Gibb, initially released in 1977. It reached number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks, starting on the week ending 30 July 1977, and again for the week ending 17 September 1977. It was Gibb’s first single released in the United Kingdom and United States. His previous single, “Words and Music” was only released in Australia. It is ranked number 26 on Billboard’s 55th anniversary All Time Top 100 list.[1] The song became a gold record.

Looks Like We Made It

“Looks Like We Made It” is a song sung by American singer Barry Manilow, from his 1976 album, This One’s for You, composed by Richard Kerr with lyrics by Will Jennings. It was released as a single on 20 April 1977.

The song was first released in 1976 on his album This One’s For You, and it was released as a single in 1977 where it reached the number one spot on both the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and the U.S. Adult Contemporary chart. It is ranked as the 37th greatest U.S. hit of 1977.

Despite the optimism suggested by the song’s title, the narrator is actually ruminating on the fact that he and his ex-lover have finally found happiness and fulfillment—though not with each other. They have, indeed, “made it,” but apart, not together. Songwriter Will Jennings commented,

Richard [Kerr] and I have often remarked on the people, millions of them in the world, who misunderstood the lyric of “Looks Like We Made It.” It is a rather sad and ironic lyric about making it apart and not together, and of course everyone thinks it is a full on, positive statement. I don’t know. Perhaps it is… in a way.[1]

Da Doo Ron Ron

“Da Doo Ron Ron” is a song written by Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich and Phil Spector. It first became a popular top five hit single for the American girl group the Crystals in 1963. American teen idol Shaun Cassidy covered the song in 1977 and his version hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. There have also been many other cover versions of this song, including a version by the Raindrops, which featured the original songwriters of “Da Doo Ron Ron” Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich.

Undercover Angel (song)

“Undercover Angel” was a hit single for singer/songwriter Alan O’Day. Certified gold, it reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 (one of 1977’s ten biggest hits)[1] and #9 on the Australian Singles Chart.

In 1977, Warner Bros. Music decided to form a special label, Pacific Records, for their composers who also performed. O’Day was the first artist signed, and his first release was “Undercover Angel.” The original vinyl pressing was released with the B-side “Just You”.

The song, which O’Day described as a “nocturnal novelette”, was released without fanfare in February 1977. Within a few months, it had reached #1 in the U.S., even without an album to support it. O’Day said of the experience, “It’s wonderful when you find out what feels right, and then it also feels right to other people. That’s a songwriter’s dream.”[2] O’Day had also composed “Angie Baby”, a #1 hit for Helen Reddy; “Undercover Angel” thus landed him in a very exclusive club of singer/songwriters who wrote a chart-topper for themselves and one for another artist.

Gonna Fly Now

“Gonna Fly Now”, also known as “Theme from Rocky”, is the theme song from the movie Rocky, composed by Bill Conti with lyrics by Carol Connors and Ayn Robbins, and performed by DeEtta Little (the sister of actor Cleavon Little) and Nelson Pigford. Released in February 1977 with the movie Rocky, the song became part of American popular culture after main character Rocky Balboa as part of his daily training regimen runs up the 72 stone steps leading to the entrance of the Philadelphia Museum of Art in Philadelphia and raises his arms in a victory pose, while the song plays. The song was written in Philadelphia. The song is also often played at sporting events, especially at sporting events in the city of Philadelphia or featuring sports teams from there.

Got to Give It Up

“Got to Give It Up” is a song by American music artist Marvin Gaye. Written by the singer and produced by Art Stewart as a response to a request from Gaye’s record label that he perform disco music, it was released in March of 1977.

Upon its release, it topped three different Billboard charts and also became a worldwide success. Gaye sometimes used the song to open up his live concert shows. The song has been covered by several acts.

Dreams (Fleetwood Mac song)

“Dreams” is a song written by singer Stevie Nicks, for the group Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 album, Rumours. It is the only U.S. No. 1 hit for the group where it sold over a million copies, and remains one of their best known songs.

The members of Fleetwood Mac were experiencing emotional upheavals while recording Rumours. Drummer Mick Fleetwood was going through a divorce. Bassist John McVie was separating from his wife, keyboardist Christine McVie. Guitarist Lindsey Buckingham and singer Stevie Nicks were ending their eight-year relationship. “We had to go through this elaborate exercise of denial,” explained Buckingham to Blender magazine, “keeping our personal feelings in one corner of the room while trying to be professional in the other.”[2]

Nicks wrote the song at the Record Plant studio in Sausalito, California, in early 1976. “One day when I wasn’t required in the main studio,” remembers singer Stevie Nicks to Blender, “I took a Fender Rhodes piano and went into another studio that was said to belong to Sly, of Sly & the Family Stone. It was a black-and-red room, with a sunken pit in the middle where there was a piano, and a big black-velvet bed with Victorian drapes.”[2]

“I sat down on the bed with my keyboard in front of me,” continues Nicks. “I found a drum pattern, switched my little cassette player on and wrote ‘Dreams’ in about 10 minutes. Right away I liked the fact that I was doing something with a dance beat, because that made it a little unusual for me.”[2]

When Nicks played the song to the rest of the group, “They weren’t nuts about it. But I said ‘Please! Please record this song, at least try it’. Because the way I play things sometimes…you really have to listen.” The band recorded it the following day. Only a basic track was recorded at Sausalito. Recording assistant Cris Morris remembers that “all (they) kept was the drum track and live vocal from Stevie – the guitars and bass were added later in Los Angeles.”[2]

Christine McVie described the song as having “just three chords and one note in the left hand” and “boring” when Nicks played a rough version on the piano. McVie changed her mind, after Lindsey “fashioned three sections out of identical chords, making each section sound completely different. He created the impression that there’s a thread running through the whole thing.”[2]

“Dreams” was the second single from the Rumours album in the US, and it reached the number one spot on 18 June 1977, and held it for one week. On the AC/Easy Listening chart, “Dreams” was Fleetwood Mac’s highest charting song during the 1970s when it reached No. 11 on that chart.[3] In the United Kingdom, “Dreams” went to No. 24 as the third single, staying in the top 40 for eight weeks, following “Go Your Own Way” (#38) and “Don’t Stop” (#32). A performance of the song on stage was used as the promotional video. Fleetwood Mac would not begin to make concept music videos until 1979.

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