eurohitlist.eu

Le Freak

“Le Freak” is a song by the band Chic. It was the band’s third single and first Billboard Hot 100 and soul music number-one song.[2][3] Along with the tracks, “I Want Your Love” and “Chic Cheer”, “Le Freak” scored number one on the disco charts for seven weeks.[4]

The single achieved sales of seven million[5] and also scored number seven in the UK singles chart.

Billboard ranked it as the No. 3 song for 1979.[6] The song was ranked number 21 on Billboard magazine’s top 100 songs of the first 55 years of the “Hot 100” chart.[7]

You Don’t Bring Me Flowers

“You Don’t Bring Me Flowers” is a song that hit the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1978. It is a song about two lovers who have drifted apart while they “go through the motions” and heartache of life together.

The song was written by Neil Diamond with Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman for the ill-fated TV show All That Glitters.[1] The song was intended to be the theme song, but Norman Lear changed the concept of the show and the song was no longer appropriate. Diamond then expanded the track from 45 seconds to 3:17, adding instrumental sections and an additional verse. The Bergmans contributed to the song’s lyrics.[2]

In 1977, Diamond released the album I’m Glad You’re Here with Me Tonight, which included the track “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers” as a solo performance. Early in 1978, Barbra Streisand covered the song on her album Songbird.

The roots of the duet version, as chronicled in myriad Streisand and Diamond biographies as well as Streisand’s Just for the Record box set, revolve around WAKY-AM/Louisville KY program director, Gary Guthrie, who spliced the two solo tracks together as a going away present to his wife, whom he had just divorced. As the real life fairytale behind the song unfolded, it triggered a media buzz worldwide from Good Morning America and People magazine to the BBC. Interest in the duet caused such a clamor on the retail level that Columbia Records was compelled to bring Streisand and Diamond into the studio to record an “official” version in October 1978. The song reached number one on the Hot 100 chart for two non-consecutive weeks in December 1978, producing the third number-one hit for both singers.[3]

Acknowledgment and gratitude for Guthrie came from CBS with a Gold record plaque, flowers from Diamond and a telegram from Streisand. The duo performed the song at the 1980 Grammy Awards show, a performance released on the 1994 album Grammy’s Greatest Moments Volume I.[4] The song peaked #17 in the Spain Top 40 Radio.[5]

Chicago’s WGN radio personality Roy Leonard and producer Peter Marino are also credited for coming up with the idea to create this duet. Leonard and Marino had put the separately recorded versions together and played them on the air.[6][7]

Radio personalities Jack Hood and Gene Kruszewski of WJR-AM/Detroit also cut a duet version of the song which was a local and regional hit and helped escalate the song’s novelty. Columbia Records granted gold records to Hood and Kruszewski in recognition of their efforts.

Diamond and Streisand had planned to star in a motion picture based on the song, but such plans were canceled when Diamond starred in a remake of The Jazz Singer.

MacArthur Park (song)

“MacArthur Park” is a song written and composed by Jimmy Webb. Richard Harris was the first to record the song in 1968: his version peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and number four on the UK Singles Chart. “MacArthur Park” was subsequently covered by numerous artists, including a hit version in 1969 by country music singer Waylon Jennings. Among the best-known covers is Donna Summer’s disco arrangement from 1978 which topped the Billboard Hot 100.[1]

Although it was a commercial success several times after its initial release, “MacArthur Park” has been called the worst song ever written.[2] Its flowery lyrics and metaphors (most famously, lost love being likened to a cake left out in the rain) have been described as “polarizing” and “loopy.”[1] Webb commented: “Those lyrics were all very real to me: there was nothing psychedelic about it to me. The cake, it was an available object. It was what I saw in the park at the birthday parties.”[1]

You Needed Me

“You Needed Me” is a song written by Randy Goodrum, who describes it as being about “unconditional undeserved love.”[2] It was a number one hit single in the United States in 1978 for Canadian singer Anne Murray. In 1999, Irish pop band Boyzone recorded a hit cover of the song that hit number one in the UK Singles Chart.

“You Needed Me” was first recorded by singer Anne Murray in 1978. The song peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and revitalized her career after several years of declining popularity as it became her first Top 40 US single since her 1974 remake of The Beatles’ “You Won’t See Me”. The song, included on her 1978 album Let’s Keep It That Way, was also a top-five country single and won Song of the Year at the Academy of Country Music awards, and is her most successful single in the United Kingdom where it made the top 30. Murray is quoted in The Billboard Book of Number One Hits by Fred Bronson as saying she wasn’t surprised by the song’s success, as she knew from the start the song would be a hit because she broke down in tears the first time she tried to sing it.

Although the song reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (and is her only song to top that chart), it never topped the two Billboard charts where Murray has had the most success — Country and Adult Contemporary. However, it spent a then-record 36 weeks on the Adult Contemporary chart, a record for chart longevity that stood until 1995.

The song earned Murray the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance at the 21st Grammy Awards,[3] the first to be awarded to a Canadian artist.
Anne Murray re-recorded the song with Shania Twain for Murray’s 2007 album Duets: Friends & Legends.

The song was featured in an ongoing storyline on the CBS soap Guiding Light in 1980-81, as a theme song for the characters Kelly Nelson and Morgan Richards. In 2013, the song was performed by Seth MacFarlane in character as Stewie Griffin on the Family Guy episode “Chris Cross”, in which Anne Murray herself guest-starred.

Hot Child in the City

“Hot Child in the City” is a song by English-Canadian musician Nick Gilder. It was released in June 1978 as a single from the album City Nights. It went to number one both in Canada (October 14, 1978) and in the United States (October 28, 1978). It was not his first number one single: as the lead singer of the glam rock band Sweeney Todd, he had hit #1 in Canada on June 26, 1976 (in the RPM listing) with the single “Roxy Roller”, which remained at the top for three weeks.[1][2][3] He won 2 Juno Awards in Canada and a People’s Choice Award in the US. According to The Billboard Book of Number 1 Hits it held the record for taking the longest amount of time to reach number one. The song became a platinum record.

Kiss You All Over

“Kiss You All Over” is a 1978 song performed by the group Exile. It was written by Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn. It was included on the band’s album Mixed Emotions, and it featured Jimmy Stokley and guitarist JP Pennington on lead vocals. It was a number one single in the United States, but proved to be Exile’s only big hit in the pop rock market. Billboard ranked it as the No. 5 song for 1978. In the United Kingdom, the song was released on Mickie Most’s RAK Records, and it peaked at number 6 in the UK Singles Chart.[1] In this song, a string synthesizer is used.

Lead vocalist on the song Stokley was ousted from the band in 1979, his health declining thereafter until he died at the age of 41 in 1985. The band moved into country music following the synth-pop success of “Kiss You All Over” and the 1979 follow-on hit “You Thrill Me” (reaching #40 (UK no. 67)) and “How Could This Go Wrong”, #88 on the charts. “Take Me Down” peaked at #3 on the Euro Hit 40 in the mid-1980s.[citation needed]

Boogie Oogie Oogie

“Boogie Oogie Oogie” is a song by American R&B band A Taste of Honey from their 1978 self-titled debut album. Released as their debut single in the summer of 1978, the song became an extremely popular “crossover” disco song. The lyrics urge listeners to “boogie oogie oogie till you just can’t boogie no more”.

It topped the U.S. pop, soul, and disco chart, and it eventually sold over two million copies and has become one of the most recognizable songs from the disco era.

Grease (song)

“Grease” is a song written by Barry Gibb and performed by Frankie Valli. “Grease” is the title song for the 1978 musical motion picture Grease, which was based on the stage play of the same name. It was featured twice on the film’s soundtrack, as the first track and reprised as the final track.

Barry Gibb wrote a title song to order for the Robert Stigwood film of the stage musical Grease.[1] Since it is heard only in the animated opening credits, it did not need to be recorded before filming. The song was recorded shortly after filming for the 1978 musical film Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, which was probably when Gibb invited Peter Frampton to the session. Frampton plays guitar on the recording, while Gibb himself provides backing vocals. The other musicians were some of those from the Andy Gibb album that was being made around the same time.[2]

Valli is known for his powerful falsetto voice, but on this track he does not sing in his upper range. The film director Randal Kleiser did not like “Grease” and the new song “You’re The One That I Want” because they did not fit the ’50s style musically or lyrically.[2] It became a No. 1 single in the United States in 1978 and also reached No. 40 on the R&B charts in the same year.[3]

The Bee Gees later performed the song in their tour One Night Only in 1997 until 1999, and captured on their live offering One Night Only.

Three Times a Lady

“Three Times a Lady” is a song by American soul group the Commodores, from their 1978 album Natural High. It was produced by James Anthony Carmichael and the Commodores. It was also the only Motown song to reach the Top 10 on the US Billboard Hot 100 that year and the Commodores’s first Billboard Hot 100 number-one hit, topping the chart for two weeks on August 12, 1978 and also went to number one the soul chart for two weeks.[1] The song spent three weeks at #1 on the adult contemporary chart.[2]

The song also reached #1 on the Canadian RPM Singles Chart for four weeks, and was one of only a few Motown singles to reach the top spot in the UK Singles Chart, staying there for five weeks.[3] The song was also successful in Ireland, staying at #1 in the charts for three consecutive weeks. It was #1 in Australia for five weeks, and reached #2 in New Zealand.

The original Commodores’ version of the song was included as the final track on Lionel Richie’s greatest hits compilation album Back To Front, released in 1992.

In an appearance on The Early Show on June 12, 2009, Lionel Richie said he was inspired to write the song because of a comment his father made about his mother. His father said to his mother “I love you. I want you. I need you. Forever” hence the three times a lady.[4]

Miss You (The Rolling Stones song)

“Miss You” is a song written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. It was released as a single by The Rolling Stones on Rolling Stones Records in May 1978, one month in advance of their album Some Girls, and peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100. An extended version, called the “Special Disco Version”, was released as the band’s first dance remix on a 12-inch single.

“Miss You” was written by Mick Jagger jamming with keyboardist Billy Preston during rehearsals for the March 1977 El Mocambo club gigs, recordings from which appeared on side three of double live album Love You Live (1977). Keith Richards is credited as co-writer as was the case for all Rolling Stones originals written by either partner or in tandem.

Shadow Dancing (song)

“Shadow Dancing” is a disco song performed by English singer-songwriter Andy Gibb that reached number one for seven weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1978. Albhy Galuten (who also produced this song) arranged the song with Barry Gibb. While Andy Gibb would have three more Top 10 hits in the U.S., this would be his final chart-topping hit in America. The song became a platinum record.

The song was written by Andy and his brothers (Barry, Maurice and Robin Gibb) in Los Angeles, while the trio of brothers were working on the film Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.[1] “And one night,” Andy would recall, “while we were relaxing, we sat down and we had to start getting tracks together for the album” (also titled Shadow Dancing, which would eventually hit #7 on the U.S. album charts). “So we literally sat down and in ten minutes, we had a group going, (singing) the chorus part. As it says underneath the song, we all wrote it, the four of us.”[2]

You’re the One That I Want

“You’re the One That I Want” is a song written by John Farrar for the 1978 film version of the musical Grease. It was performed by John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John. It is one of the best-selling singles of all time, having sold over 3 million copies among the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and France alone, with estimates of more than 15 million copies sold overall.[2][3][4][5]

Too Much, Too Little, Too Late

“Too Much, Too Little, Too Late” is a song performed by singers Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams. Lyrics and music are arranged by Nat Kipner and John Vallins. The single was a comeback of sorts for Mathis, as it was his first chart-topping hit in the US since 1957’s “Chances Are”.

Released as a single in 1978, it reached number 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop chart, Adult Contemporary chart,[1] and R&B chart.[2] Outside the U.S., the song peaked at number nine on the Canadian Singles Chart[3] and number three on the UK Singles Chart.
“Too Much, Too Little, Too Late” was certified gold and silver in the US and in the UK by the RIAA and the British Phonographic Industry respectively.[4][5]

Later in 1978 the duo released a follow-up single, “You’re All I Need to Get By” (which peaked at number 47 on the Hot 100), and a full album of duets, That’s What Friends Are For. The success of the duets with Williams prompted Mathis to record duets with a variety of partners including Jane Olivor, Dionne Warwick, Natalie Cole, Gladys Knight, and Nana Mouskouri. A compilation album, also called Too Much, Too Little, Too Late and released by Sony Music in 1995, featured the title track among other songs by the Mathis/Williams duo.

With a Little Luck

“With a Little Luck” is a single by the band Wings from their 1978 album London Town.

Written in Scotland, “With a Little Luck” would become Wings’ follow-up single to the then best-selling UK Single of all time, “Mull of Kintyre.”

Recorded in May 1977 aboard the boat Fair Carol, which had been fitted with a 24-track studio, in the Virgin Islands for the proposed album, working title Water Wings,[2] which was released in 1978 as the band’s seventh album, London Town. During these recordings, Wings’ lead guitarist Jimmy McCulloch and drummer Joe English had recorded tracks but had left, returning the band to the three-piece line-up which had recorded Band on the Run in 1973. McCartney played electric piano, bass and synthesizer in the song; probably English was on drums, while Denny Laine and Linda McCartney helped with some keyboards.[3]

Released in March 1978, the first single from the album, “With a Little Luck” hit No.1 in the United States[4] and No.5 in the UK.[4][5] While it was at the top of the charts in the USA, McCartney announced the new Wings line up featuring lead guitarist Laurence Juber and drummer Steve Holly.

The single’s b-side consists of the segue of two short tracks, “Backward Travellers”/”Cuff Link”, also on the album, the first of which is a song and the second an instrumental that features a heavily synthesized guitar theme.

Author Chris Ingham praised the song as one of the best on the album, stating it was “full of the most sensitive pop synthesizer touches.”[6] Tom Waseleski of the Beaver County Times regarded “With a Little Luck” as having “more substance” than other of McCartney’s soft rock tracks.[7]

The song’s music video, directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, aired in the UK on 9 May 1978, as part of Granada Television’s Paul TV show.[8]

If I Can’t Have You

“If I Can’t Have You” is a disco song written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb in 1977. The song initially appeared on the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack in a version by Yvonne Elliman, released in November 1977. The Bee Gees’ version appeared a month later as the B-side of “Stayin’ Alive”.

The song later appeared on the Bee Gees’ compilation Their Greatest Hits: The Record. The remixed version was released and remastered in the compilation Bee Gees Greatest in 2007 and marked the return of the Bee Gees to the US Hot Dance Tracks charts after 28 years. According to Maurice, this track was the first song they did while they were recording the other songs for the film. The recording was started at Château d’Hérouville as a basic track only and completed later at Cherokee Studios in Los Angeles.[1]

Night Fever

“Night Fever” is a song written and performed by the Bee Gees. It first appeared on the soundtrack to Saturday Night Fever. Producer Robert Stigwood wanted to call the film Saturday Night, but singer Robin Gibb expressed hesitation at the title. Stigwood liked the title Night Fever but was wary of marketing a movie with that name.
The B-side was a live version of “Down the Road” in 1977, previously released on Here at Last… Bee Gees… Live.

(Love Is) Thicker Than Water

“(Love Is) Thicker Than Water” is a song performed by Andy Gibb, released in 1977, it was his second single that topped the US Billboard Hot 100. It was mainly written by Barry Gibb, with help from Andy Gibb. The B-side of this song was “Words and Music” in the US, but “Flowing Rivers” in the UK.[1] It became a gold record.

Billboard magazine describes the song as “a midtempo ballad that changes pace from a lushly romantic and soft [Andy] Gibb vocal to an uptempo instrumental drive. Plenty of melody and another catchy hook”.[2]

Stayin’ Alive

“Stayin’ Alive” is a disco song by the Bee Gees from the Saturday Night Fever motion picture soundtrack. The song was written by the Bee Gees members (Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb) and produced by the Bee Gees, Albhy Galuten, and Karl Richardson. It was released on 13 December 1977 as the second single from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. It is one of their signature songs. In 2004, “Stayin’ Alive” was placed at number 189 on the list of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[3] In 2004, it ranked No. 9 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema. In a UK television poll on ITV in December 2011 it was voted fifth in “The Nation’s Favourite Bee Gees Song”.[4]

Upon release, “Stayin’ Alive” climbed the charts to hit the number one spot on the Billboard Hot 100 the week of 4 February 1978, remaining there for four weeks. In the process, it became one of the band’s most recognisable tunes, in part because of its place at the beginning of Saturday Night Fever. In the US, it would become the second of six consecutive number-one singles, tying the record with the Beatles for most consecutive number ones in the US at the time (a record broken by Whitney Houston who achieved seven consecutive number-ones).

Baby Come Back (Player song)

“Baby Come Back” is a song recorded by the American rock band Player. It was released in late 1977 as the first single from their self-titled first studio album. The song was their biggest single, hitting number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 10 on the soul charts, in 1978. It was the breakthrough single for the band, gaining them mainstream success, and hit number one, knocking label-mates The Bee Gees’ “How Deep Is Your Love” from the top spot. Written by lead singer Peter Beckett and J.C. Crowley, the founders of Player, and sung by Beckett, it is listed 8th in the Top Ten Yacht Rock Songs Of All Time.

How Deep Is Your Love (Bee Gees song)

“How Deep Is Your Love” is a pop ballad written and recorded by the Bee Gees in 1977 and released as a single in September. It was ultimately used as part of the soundtrack to the film Saturday Night Fever. It was a number three hit in the United Kingdom and Australia. In the United States, it topped the Billboard Hot 100 on 24 December 1977 (becoming the first of six consecutive US number-one hits) and stayed in the Top 10 for a then-record 17 weeks. The single spent six weeks atop the US adult contemporary chart. It is listed at number 22 on the 55th anniversary edition of Billboard’s All Time Top 100.[1] Alongside “Stayin’ Alive” and “Night Fever”, it is one of the group’s three tracks on the list. The song was covered by Take That for their 1996 Greatest Hits album, reaching number-one on the UK Singles Chart for three weeks.[2]

“How Deep Is Your Love” ranked number 375 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. In a British TV special shown in December 2011, it was voted “The Nation’s Favourite Bee Gees Song” by ITV viewers.[3] The song set a record by accumulating 33 weeks in one chart run. It was originally intended for Yvonne Elliman, but she later recorded “If I Can’t Have You” instead.[4]
During the Bee Gees’ 2001 Billboard magazine interview, Barry reportedly said that “How Deep Is Your Love” was his favorite Bee Gees song.[5]

Besides being used in Saturday Night Fever, the song has also been featured in other films such as Donnie Brasco, Ready to Rumble, Forever Fever, Tongan Ninja, Anger Management, Adam’s Apples, Disco, and Sex and the City. It’s also used in television shows such as Get a Life, Ballykissangel, Marienhof, You Are The One, Two Faces, Nip/Truck, The Simpsons, and Parenthood.

Scroll To Top