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Babe (Styx song)

“Babe” is a song by the American rock band Styx. It was the lead single from the band’s 1979 triple-platinum album Cornerstone. The song was Styx’s first, and only, U.S. number-one single. It additionally held the number-one spot for six weeks on the Canadian RPM national singles chart, charting in December 1979 and becoming the opening chart-topper of the 1980s. It was also the band’s only UK Top 40 hit, peaking at #6.

The song was written by member Dennis DeYoung as a birthday present for his wife Suzanne. The finished track was recorded as a demo with just DeYoung and Styx members John Panozzo and Chuck Panozzo playing on the track, with DeYoung singing all of the harmonies himself.

The song was not originally intended to be a Styx track, but Styx members James “J.Y.” Young and Tommy Shaw convinced DeYoung to put the song on Cornerstone. As a result, DeYoung’s demo was placed on Cornerstone with Shaw overdubbing a guitar solo in the song’s middle section. The track became a major hit, reaching #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100, and was their only major UK hit single, reaching #6. In 1999, “Babe” was included in the soundtrack to the movie Big Daddy, starring Adam Sandler, whose character is a huge fan of Styx.

Despite the song’s enormous success, it has not been performed live by the band since singer Dennis DeYoung was dismissed in 1999. DeYoung, however, still performs the song regularly on his solo tours.

No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)

“No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” is a 1979 song recorded as a duet by Barbra Streisand and Donna Summer.

The song was recorded for Streisand’s Wet album and also as a new track for Summer’s compilation double album entitled On the Radio: Greatest Hits Volumes 1 & 2. The full-length version was found on Streisand’s album, while a longer 11 minute plus version (the 12″ version) was featured on Summer’s album. The Summer version features additional production by frequent collaborator Harold Faltermeyer, and incorporates a harder rock edge. The single was released on both Casablanca Records (Summer’s label) and Columbia Records (Streisand’s label) and sales of the two were amalgamated. The versions on the two 7″ singles differed slightly however, with different mixes and slightly different background vocal arrangements. The formats differed between nations – in the UK for example, the song was only released on 7″ by Casablanca, and 12″ (the extended version from the On The Radio album) by Columbia.[citation needed]

Although the sales of the two labels’ releases were amalgamated, both the 7″ and the 12″ were certified Gold by the RIAA in early 1980. The 7″ single was eventually certified Platinum, signifying sales of two million US copies.

Bowing on the Hot 100 at #59 on 20 October 1979, the single went to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 24 November – 1 December 1979 (making it both singers’ fourth chart-topping single in the U.S., as well as Summer’s final) and number one for four weeks on the disco chart.[1] It was also a big international hit, and made the top three in the UK.[citation needed]

Summer and Streisand never performed the song together live after recording it, although Summer did sing the song in concert with other female performers, including Tina Arena and her sister Mary Gaines Bernard.[citation needed] Barbra Streisand included a short snippet of it in her 2012 Back To Brooklyn Tour, talking about the recent passing of Donna Summer and how she wished Donna were alive to sing it with her.

Still (Commodores song)

“Still” is a song by the soul music group the Commodores. It reached number one in the United States in 1979. It was released as a single on Motown Records with “Such a Woman” as the B-side. The song appears on their hit album Midnight Magic. The song reached the top of both the pop and R&B charts.[1] It is one of the group’s most popular singles. The song is also notable for being their last R&B #1 before Lionel Richie went solo. It also reached #4 in the UK Singles Charts.

In 1981, actor-singer John Schneider took a cover version to number 69 on the pop chart. It was the b-side to his country single “Them Good Ol’ Boys Are Bad”, which reached number 13 on the country chart.[2]

Heartache Tonight

“Heartache Tonight” is a song written by Don Henley, Glenn Frey, Bob Seger and J. D. Souther, and recorded by the Eagles. The track was included on their album The Long Run and released as a single in 1979. It reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in November of that year. Although it remained in the top position for only one week, the single sold 1 million copies. It was the Eagles’ final chart-topping song on the Hot 100.

The recording also received a Grammy Award for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. The song originated from an electric jam session between Glenn Frey and J. D. Souther who would visit Frey’s home in Los Angeles whenever he was in town on tour. Frey and Souther wrote the first verse while listening to Sam Cooke songs. In the heat of jamming, Frey called Seger on the phone and sang him the verse. Seger then blurted out the chorus. According to Frey, “J.D. [Souther], Don and I finished that song up. No heavy lyrics-the song is more of a romp-and that’s what it was intended to be.”[1] The song was covered by country music singer John Anderson on the tribute album Common Thread: The Songs of the Eagles and was also covered by Michael Bublé on his album Crazy Love.

Pop Muzik

“Pop Muzik” is a 1979 song by M, a project by English musician Robin Scott, from the debut album New York • London • Paris • Munich.

The single, first released in the UK in early 1979, was bolstered by a music video that was well received by critics. The clip featured Scott as a DJ singing into a microphone from behind an exaggerated turntable setup, at times flanked by two female models who sang and danced in a robotic manner. The video also featured Brigit Novik, Scott’s partner at the time, who provided the backup vocals for the track.[4]

The single’s B-side, “M Factor”, was featured in two different versions. The original cut appeared on the first UK and European releases of the single, while a slightly remixed version appeared on the single released in the United States and Canada.

The song reached number one in more than seven countries and was one of the most popular singles of 1979.

Rise (instrumental)

“Rise” is an instrumental written by Andy Armer and Randy Badazz Alpert, and first recorded by trumpeter Herb Alpert. The instrumental track was included on Alpert’s solo album Rise and released as a single in 1979. It reached number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in October of that year and remained in the top position for two weeks. Herb Alpert thus became the first (and only) artist to reach the top of the Hot 100 with a vocal performance (“This Guy’s in Love with You”, 1968) as well as an instrumental performance. “Rise” also spent one week atop the adult contemporary chart. “Rise” was successful on the other charts, peaking at number four on the R&B chart[1] and number seventeen on the disco chart.[2] The recording also received a Grammy Award for Best Pop Instrumental Performance. Songwriters Andy Armer and Randy Badazz Alpert were both nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition.

“Rise” was originally recorded as an uptempo dance number, however, while recording the master at A&M studios, the drummer on the session, Steve Schaefer, strongly suggested that Herb and Randy try slowing the tempo down to 100bpm. Upon release, the instrumental received an unexpected burst of promotion: Jill Farren Phelps, musical director of the ABC soap opera General Hospital, decided to use “Rise” as the musical backdrop for the rape of Laura Webber by Luke Spencer. For several weeks afterward, the recording was played on the show to evoke the memory of Luke’s act. The added exposure in an extremely popular program boosted sales to the point of selling more than one million copies.

Shortly after “Rise” became a hit in the United States, it became a hit in the United Kingdom when British disc jockeys were playing import copies of the record at the wrong speed.

In the 1981 Hindi movie Yaarana starring Amitabh Bachchan and Neetu Singh, Neetu Singh teaches Amitabh some dance moves to this tune. The piece almost plays full length as Amitabh masters disco dancing.

A sample of “Rise” is the entire musical groove of the 1997 number-one worldwide hit song, “Hypnotize”, recorded by The Notorious B.I.G. and co-produced by Sean “Puffy” Combs. The sample is credited on both the single, “Hypnotize” and in the liner notes for the Notorious B.I.G’s album, Life After Death.

“Run” by Bel Biv DiVoe samples the same portion sampled in Hypnotize.

In 1999, Brazilian saxophonist Léo Gandelman did a remake of “Rise” for his album “Brazilian Soul”.

R&B singer Monica sampled the recording on the song I’m Back on her 2002 album All Eyez on Me.

Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough

“Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” is a single written and recorded by American singer Michael Jackson. Released under Epic Records on August 10, 1979, the song is the first single from Jackson’s fifth studio album, titled Off the Wall. The song was the first solo recording over which Jackson had creative control.

“Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” was Jackson’s first single to hit #1 on the United States Billboard Hot 100 chart in seven years, and his first solo #1 on the Soul singles chart.[2] It remained at #1 for six weeks on Billboard’s Soul chart. The song was a worldwide success. Within a few months of release, the 45 was certified Gold, and eventually earned a Platinum certification for sales in excess of two million US copies.

“Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” was well received by contemporary music critics. An accompanying music video for the song was released in October 1979. The video shows Jackson dancing, as well as being shown in a triplicate, in different color backgrounds. The song also won Jackson his first solo Grammy and American Music Awards. “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” is considered to be the first song to showcase Jackson’s talent as a solo artist, both as a singer and songwriter. Since the song’s release, it has been covered by numerous musicians.

Sad Eyes

“Sad Eyes” is a song written and recorded by Robert John, and released in April 1979. It debuted May 19 on the Billboard Hot 100, reaching the top of the chart on October 6. The song was produced by George Tobin in Association With Mike Piccirillo.

“Sad Eyes” is one of just a few non-disco, or disco-influenced, songs to top the 1979 pop charts, although by the time it went to number one the anti-disco backlash had made it easier for other styles to reach the top.

My Sharona

“My Sharona” is the debut single by the Knack. The song was written by Berton Averre and Doug Fieger, and released in 1979 from their album Get the Knack. It reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart where it remained for 6 weeks, and was number one on Billboard’s 1979 Top Pop Singles year-end chart.

It was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America, representing one million copies sold, and was Capitol Records’ fastest gold status debut single since the Beatles’ “I Want to Hold Your Hand” in 1964.[6]

Good Times (Chic song)

“Good Times” is a song by American R&B band Chic from their third album Risqué (1979). The disco song is ranked #229 on Rolling Stone ‘s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and has become one of the most sampled tunes in music history, most notably in hip hop music.

The lyrics are largely based on Milton Ager’s “Happy Days Are Here Again.” It also contains lines based on lyrics featured in “About a Quarter to Nine” made famous by Al Jolson. Nile Rodgers has stated that these depression-era lyrics were used as a hidden way to comment on the then-current economic depression in the United States.[1]

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