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Private Eyes (song)

“Private Eyes” is a 1981 single by Hall & Oates and the title track from their album of that year. The song was number one on the Billboard Hot 100 charts for two weeks, from November 7 through November 20, 1981. This single was the band’s third of six number one hits (the first two being “Rich Girl” and “Kiss on My List”), and their second number one hit of the 1980s. It was succeeded in the number one position by Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical,” which was in turn succeeded by another single from Hall and Oates, “I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do).”

Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)

“Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” is a song performed and co-written by American singer-songwriter Christopher Cross, which was the main theme for the 1981 film Arthur starring Dudley Moore and Liza Minnelli. The song won the Oscar for Best Original Song in 1981. [1] In the US, it reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and on the Hot Adult Contemporary charts during October 1981, remaining at the top on the Hot 100 for three consecutive weeks. Overseas, it also went to number one on the VG-lista chart in Norway, and was a top ten hit all around the world. The song became the second and last American number one hit by Christopher Cross.[2] It was included as a bonus track only on the CD & Cassette versions of his second album Another Page, released in 1983.

Indie pop band Fitz and the Tantrums recorded a cover of this song for the soundtrack to the 2011 remake of the film.

Endless Love (song)

“Endless Love” is a song written by Lionel Richie and originally recorded as a duet between Richie and fellow soul singer Diana Ross. In this ballad, the singers declare their “endless love” for one another. It was covered by soul singer Luther Vandross with R&B singer Mariah Carey and also by country music singer Shania Twain. Richie’s friend (and sometimes co-worker) Kenny Rogers has also recorded the song. Billboard has named the original version as the greatest song duet of all-time.[1]

Jessie’s Girl

“Jessie’s Girl” is a song written and performed by Australian singer Rick Springfield. It was released on the album Working Class Dog. The song is about unrequited love, and centers on a young man in love with his best friend’s girlfriend.

Upon its release in the United States in 1981, the song was slow to break out. It debuted on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart on 28 March[2] but took 19 weeks to hit No. 1[3] reaching that position on 1 August,[4] one of the slowest climbs to number one at that time.[3] It remained at No. 1 for two weeks and would be Springfield’s only No. 1 hit.[2] The song was at No. 1 when MTV launched on 1 August 1981.[5] Billboard ranked it as the No. 5 song for all of 1981.[6]

The song also peaked at No. 1 in Springfield’s native Australia and later won Springfield a Grammy Award for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance.

The song was released in the United Kingdom in March 1984 and peaked at number 43 on the UK Singles Chart in April 1984.[7]

Springfield recorded an acoustic version of the song for his 1999 album, Karma.

The One That You Love

“The One That You Love” is a popular song written by Graham Russell and sung by Australian soft rock band Air Supply that reached number one in the United States in 1981. It topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart on July 25, 1981, and remained there for one week, becoming the band’s only number one hit. In Canada, it knocked the Stars on 45 medley off the top spot and stayed there for five weeks.[1]

“The One That You Love” also peaked at number two for five weeks on the Adult Contemporary chart.[2]

Stars on 45 (song)

“Stars on 45” is a song issued in January 1981 by the studio group Stars on 45. In some countries, including the UK, Ireland and New Zealand, the band was credited as ‘Starsound’ and the medley itself was named “Stars on 45”. Its official title in the US (as on the record and in Billboard) where it was credited to ‘Stars on 45’ was “Medley: Intro ‘Venus’ / Sugar Sugar / No Reply / I’ll Be Back / Drive My Car / Do You Want to Know a Secret / We Can Work It Out / I Should Have Known Better / Nowhere Man / You’re Going to Lose That Girl / Stars on 45”. It is (to date) the longest titled song to ever chart in Billboard, and is conveniently shortened to “Stars on 45 Medley”, or “‘Medley’ by Stars on 45”. The reason for the long title was copyright requirements for the use of The Beatles’ songs.

It reached number 1 in the Netherlands in February 21, 1981; number 2 in the UK in April 1981; and number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on June 20, 1981. In the US, the single also peaked at number 18 on the dance chart.[1] In the US, the song’s one-week stay at the top of the Hot 100 interrupted the Kim Carnes single “Bette Davis Eyes” run as the number 1 single at five weeks. The next week, Carnes’ song regained its number 1 status for an additional four weeks.

The origin of the single was the Netherlands where numerous bootleg disco singles were floating around. Willem van Kooten, the owner of one of the copyrights, decided to make a similar, legitimate record of a 12″ single titled “Let’s Do It in the 80s Great Hits” credited to a group called Passion (though the snippets of songs were taken from the original recordings).[2] He found singers who sounded similar to John Lennon and Paul McCartney and decided to make the single focus on The Beatles. The original version was a 9-minute, 45-second 12″ mix, then a 45 version was also released, and the Beatles medley was later extended to a full 16-minute album side. It appeared on the Stars on 45’s first full-length release, Long Play Album (US title: Stars on Long Play; UK title: Stars on 45 – The Album).

The album version of the song moved “Venus” and “Sugar Sugar” to Side Two into a different medley, and added several more Beatles songs as well as a 32-second instrumental extract from George Harrison’s “My Sweet Lord” and even a fleeting reference to new wave band Sparks’ “Beat the Clock,” for a total length of about 15 minutes. The album version was released as Long Play Album in the Netherlands, and retitled Stars on Long Play in the US and Stars on 45 — The Album in the UK. A detailed listing of the source material can be found in the Long Play Album article.

The song became also a huge success in the UK where it kicked off a craze for medleys, with a large number of records in the Stars on 45 mold reaching the UK Top 40 in 1981. Likewise, in the US the song started a medley craze that lasted for about a year and introduced not only other medleys by Stars on 45, but medleys by The Beach Boys, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Larry Elgart and His Manhattan Swing Orchestra, as well as others.

Bette Davis Eyes

“Bette Davis Eyes” is a song written and composed by Donna Weiss and Jackie DeShannon, and made popular by American singer Kim Carnes. DeShannon recorded it in 1974; Carnes’s 1981 version spent nine weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was Billboard’s biggest hit of the entire year for 1981. It was also her only Top 40 hit on the UK Singles Chart, getting to No. 10. The 1981 recording won the 1982 Grammy Awards for both Record of the Year and Song of the Year.

9 to 5 (Sheena Easton song)

“9 to 5” or “Morning Train” is the title of a popular song written by British songwriter Florrie Palmer and recorded by Sheena Easton in 1980, becoming her biggest hit. It peaked at number three in the United Kingdom in August 1980 and was certified gold. It was released in the United States in February 1981, where it reached number one.

Easton had released one single prior to “9 to 5”: “Modern Girl”. This had failed to chart highly, but after exposure on the BBC documentary, The Big Time, Pop Singer, both “9 to 5” and “Modern Girl” were propelled into the top ten at the same time, making her the second female artist (after Ruby Murray) to achieve this feat. [2] “9 to 5” became a top three hit and was one of the best-selling singles of the year.[3]

Early in 1981, EMI Records decided to launch Easton in the US and released “9 to 5” as her debut single. The title of the song was changed to “Morning Train (Nine to Five)” to avoid confusion with the Dolly Parton song of the same name, which charted nearly simultaneously with Easton’s record. Easton’s song went to #1 on both the U.S. pop and adult contemporary charts; it remained at the top for two weeks on Billboard’s pop chart. On Billboard’s 1981 year-end charts, it came in as the twelfth-biggest pop and thirteenth-biggest AC hit of the year 1981. It also topped the RPM magazine pop and AC charts in Canada, reigning over the former for two weeks in May 1981.

The song is about a woman who waits at home all day for her man to come home from work. The music video was filmed on the Bluebell Railway, a heritage line running between East and West Sussex in England. The video stars London and South Western Railway No. 488, a preserved LSWR 0415 Class locomotive.

Kiss on My List

“Kiss on My List” is a song by the American duo Hall & Oates. It was written by Daryl Hall and Janna Allen, and produced by the duo. It was the third single release from their ninth studio album, Voices (1980), and became their second U.S. Billboard Hot 100 number-one single (after “Rich Girl” in 1977). It spent three weeks at the top spot.

The song was written with the intention of Janna Allen, sister of Hall’s longtime girlfriend Sara Allen, singing it, as she was interested in starting a music career. Hall cut a demo version as a guide for her, but later when his manager found the tape lying around the studio, he insisted that Hall and Oates cut the song themselves. In fact, the production team liked the demo so much that they didn’t do a second take, instead adding background vocals and instrumentation to the demo and mixing them together. Hall recalled that’s why the drums sounded so “dinky.”

The song was one of the music videos that aired on MTV’s first day of broadcast.

The 45 version of the song appears on the compilation albums Rock ‘n Soul Part 1 (1983) and Playlist: The Very Best of Daryl Hall & John Oates (2008).

While two other songs from the album had returned the duo to chart activity, it was the success of “Kiss on My List” that confirmed the start of the duo’s sustained run as one of American pop’s top-selling acts, a run that lasted into 1990.

Rapture (Blondie song)

“Rapture” is a song by the American pop rock band Blondie from their fifth studio album, Autoamerican (1980).

In January 1981, “Rapture” was released as the second and final single from the album. The song reached No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, where it stayed for two weeks. It was the first No. 1 song in the U.S. to feature rap. The song peaked at No. 4 in Australia and No. 5 in the United Kingdom.

“Rapture” is a combination of disco, funk, and hip hop with the rap section forming an extended coda.[1][2] The song title “Rapture” served to indicate this element. While it was not the first single featuring rapping to be commercially successful, it was the first to top the charts. Its lyrics were especially notable for namechecking hip-hop pioneers Fab Five Freddy and Grandmaster Flash.

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