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Out of Touch

“Out of Touch” is a 1984 song by Hall & Oates. The lead single from their 1984 album Big Bam Boom, it was their last Billboard Hot 100 number one, topping the Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks in December 1984. It became the duo’s fourteenth consecutive top 40 hit since 1980.[1]

The song often segued from “Dance on Your Knees” which is the opening song of the album. The music video also contains the “Dance on Your Knees” intro, which segues into an edit of the 12″ remix version.

Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go

“Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” is a song by the British duo Wham!, first released as a single in the UK on 14 May 1984.[1] It became their first American and UK number-one hit. It was written and produced by George Michael, one half of the duo. In 2015, the song was voted by the British public as the nation’s 13th favourite 1980s number one in a poll for ITV.[2]

Michael’s inspiration for the song was a scribbled note left by his Wham! partner Andrew Ridgeley for Andrew’s parents,[3] originally intended to read “wake me up before you go” but with “up” accidentally written twice, so Ridgeley wrote “go” twice on purpose. Released in May 1984, it heralded the beginning of a softer, sunnier image for Wham!, who had spent the previous year as a moodier, more politically themed duo, with songs about unemployment, young marriage, and battles of will between parents and their children. With the release of “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go”, they re-emerged with wider smiles, more colourful clothing, and a more positive disposition in interviews.

In 1984, George Michael had this to say on the development of the song:

“I just wanted to make a really energetic pop record that had all the best elements of Fifties and Sixties records, combined with our attitude and our approach, which is obviously more uptempo and a lot younger than some of those records. It’s one of those tracks that gets rid of a lot of your own personal influences; it reminds me of so many different records that I couldn’t actually nail them down. I’d done a demo at home that just had a bass line and a vocal on it. Usually, I write the record in my head; I know what all the parts are going to be and I sing them to all our musicians. And it was great. … We actually did it as a rehearsal. We used a Linn drum because the drummer was late, and it was such a good track that we kept it.”[4]

The song entered the UK Singles Chart at number four — after much hype from the duo claiming they would go straight in at number one, which was a rare occurrence then — and climbed to the top spot seven days later, staying there for two weeks. The song also went to the top of the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, holding the top spot for three weeks.

The UK sleeve was designed by Peter Saville, with photography by Trevor Key.[5]

The song is featured in the films Rock Odyssey, The Big Picture, Charlie’s Angels, Zoolander, Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby, Tween Academy: Class of 2012, Happy Feet Two, Kath & Kimderella, Walking on Sunshine, Zoolander 2, and Sausage Party.

Caribbean Queen

“Caribbean Queen (No More Love on the Run)” is a song by English recording artist Billy Ocean. Co-written and co-produced by Keith Diamond, it climbed to number one on both the Billboard Hot 100 and the Black Singles chart in the US[2] and number six in the UK Singles Chart in 1984.[3] The song won Ocean the 1985 Grammy Award for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance, making him the first British artist to win in that category.

The saxophone solo is by Vernon Jeffrey Smith.[4]

I Just Called to Say I Love You – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“I Just Called to Say I Love You” is a song written, produced and performed by Stevie Wonder.[2] It is one of Wonder’s most commercially successful singles.

The song was first featured in the 1984 comedy The Woman in Red,[2] along with two other songs by Wonder, and scored number one on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks from October 13 to 27, 1984. It also became his tenth number-one on the R&B chart, and his fourth on the adult contemporary chart; it spent three weeks atop both charts, and for the same weeks as on the Hot 100.[3] The song also became Wonder’s only solo UK number-one success, staying at the top for six weeks, in the process also becoming Motown Records’ biggest-selling single in the UK, a distinction it still holds as of 2015.[2] In addition, the song won both a Golden Globe and an Academy Award for Best Original Song.[2] The song also received three nominations at the 27th Grammy Awards for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, Song of the Year and Best Pop Instrumental Performance.

There was a dispute among Wonder, his former writing partner Lee Garrett, and Lloyd Chiate as to who actually wrote the song. Chiate claimed in a lawsuit that he and Garrett wrote the song years before its 1984 release; however a jury ultimately sided with Wonder.[4]

Let’s Go Crazy

“Let’s Go Crazy” is a 1984 song by Prince and The Revolution, from the album Purple Rain. It was the opening track on both the album and the film Purple Rain. “Let’s Go Crazy” was one of Prince’s most popular songs, and was almost always a staple for concert performances, often segueing into other hits. When released as a single, the song became Prince’s second number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100, and also topped the two component charts, the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs[3] and Hot Dance Club Play charts,[4] as well as becoming a UK Top 10 hit. The B-side was the lyrically controversial “Erotic City”. In the UK, the song was released as a double A-side with “Take Me with U”.

Common to much of Prince’s writing, the song is thought to be exhortation to follow Christian ethics, with the “De-elevator” of the lyrics being a metaphor for the Devil.[5]

The extended “Special Dance Mix” of the song was performed in a slightly edited version in the film Purple Rain. It contains a longer instrumental section in the middle, including a solo on an apparently out-of-tune piano and some muddled lyrics, repeating the track’s introduction.

Following Prince’s death, the song re-charted on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart at number 39 and rose to number 25 by the week of May 14, 2016. As of April 30, 2016, it has sold 964,403 copies in the United States.[6]

Missing You (John Waite song)

“Missing You” is a song co-written and recorded by English musician John Waite. It was released in June 1984 as the lead single from the album No Brakes. It peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 during the week of 22 September 1984, and number nine on the UK Singles Chart.

John Waite re-recorded the song with country/bluegrass artist Alison Krauss which appeared on her album A Hundred Miles or More: A Collection, and released it to country music radio in 2007. The re-recording peaked at #34 on the Hot Country Songs chart. The original recording has been featured in the films, Selena (1997) and Warm Bodies (2013),[1] the video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, and the TV series Miami Vice (from the episode, “Heart of Darkness”, originally aired September 28, 1984),[2] as well as in the comedy sitcom “Rules of Engagement”, in a scene at the diner where there is a flashback of Timmy and Russell’s best moments together (season 7, episode “A Wee Problem”, originally aired on 6 May 2013). It also appears in the film 22 Jump Street (2014) during the montage where main characters Schmidt and Jenko begin to miss each other after going their separate ways following a fight. The intro also features in the late eighties film “The Great Outdoors” with Dan Aykroyd and John Candy. The song is mentioned[by whom?] as being a favorite and significant song to OJ Simpson and is the inspiration for the title of the book Raging Heart by Sheila Weller.[citation needed]

Original MTV personality Nina Blackwood said in the book VJ: The Unplugged Adventures of MTV’s First Wave that Waite had written the song about her. She later told the Tampa Bay Times that Waite confirmed this to her after the book’s publication.[3]

In 1985, Waite was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance for this song.

What’s Love Got to Do with It (song)

“What’s Love Got to Do with It” is a song recorded by the American singer Tina Turner, released in 1984. It was taken from her fifth solo album, Private Dancer and became Turner’s most successful single.

Although Turner had already scored a UK Top 10 and U.S. Top 30 hit some months earlier with her rendition of “Let’s Stay Together”, “What’s Love Got To Do With It” gave Turner her first and only U.S. number one. The song ranked #309 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”. It also ranked #38 on Songs of the Century. It was the 17th best-selling single of 1984 in the United Kingdom. In 1993, the song’s title was used as the title for the biographical film about Turner’s life.

It was featured in the Miami Vice episode “Calderone’s Return (Part II)”, as Sonny Crockett and Ricardo Tubbs leave St. Andrews Island by boat and end credits.

In 2012, “What’s Love Got to Do with It” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame[2] giving Turner her 3rd Grammy Hall of Fame Award and her 11th Grammy Award.

Ghostbusters (song)

“Ghostbusters” is a 1984 song recorded by Ray Parker Jr. as the theme to the film of the same name starring Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis and Ernie Hudson. Debuting at #68 on June 16, 1984, the song reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on August 11, 1984, staying there for three weeks, and at number two on the UK Singles Chart on September 16, 1984, staying there for three weeks. The song re-entered the UK Top 75 on November 2, 2008, at No. 49.

It was nominated at the 57th Academy Awards for Best Original Song, but lost to Stevie Wonder’s “I Just Called to Say I Love You”.

When Doves Cry

“When Doves Cry” is a song by American musician Prince, and the lead single from his 1984 album Purple Rain. It was a worldwide hit, and his first American number one single, topping the charts for five weeks. According to Billboard magazine, it was the top-selling single of the year. It was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America, shipping two million units in the United States.[4] It was the last single released by a solo artist to receive such certification before the certification requirements were lowered in 1989.

The song ranked number 52 on the Rolling Stone list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and is included in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.[5]

Following Prince’s death, the song re-charted on the Billboard Hot 100 chart at number eight, its first appearance in the top 10 since the week ending September 1, 1984. As of April 30, 2016, it has sold 1,385,448 copies in the United States.[6]

The Reflex

“The Reflex” is the eleventh single by Duran Duran, released worldwide on 16 April 1984. The song was heavily remixed for single release and was the third and last to be taken from their third album Seven and the Ragged Tiger.

“The Reflex” became the band’s most successful single. It was their second single to top the UK Singles Chart, after “Is There Something I Should Know?” in 1983, topping the chart on 5 May, and would prove to be their last UK no. 1. The single entered the charts in America on 21 April 1984 at no. 46, became Duran Duran’s first of two singles to hit no. 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 (for 2 weeks) on 23 June 1984 (see 1984 in music), and was a huge hit internationally. (Their only other single to hit no. 1 in the US was the title song to the James Bond film “A View to a Kill”.) It was also the first of two songs that kept “Dancing in the Dark” by Bruce Springsteen out of the top spot (the other one being Prince’s “When Doves Cry”). The band wanted it to be the lead single from Seven and the Ragged Tiger, but their label didn’t like the warbling singing during the “why don’t you use it” segments, thinking this would hinder its success as a stand-alone single track.

The remixes for both the 7″ and 12″ singles were created by Nile Rodgers, of Chic fame. It was his first work with the band, and he would later go on to produce “The Wild Boys” single as well as the album Notorious (1986) and several tracks on Astronaut (2004).

Producer Ian Little recalled the sound Nick Rhodes came up with on his Roland Jupiter-8 keyboard: “…whenever I hear that steel-drum part it always brings a smile to my face because it’s so out of tune. Steel drums always are, but it was exactly right in terms of rhythm and tone. So a wood-block sound was mixed in to make it even more percussive and, successfully, it did the job.”[1]

Time After Time (Cyndi Lauper song)

“Time After Time” is a song by American singer-songwriter Cyndi Lauper. It was recorded by Lauper for her debut studio album, She’s So Unusual (1983), with Rob Hyman (co-writer and founding member of the rock band The Hooters) contributing backing vocals. The track was produced by Rick Chertoff and released as a single on January 27, 1984. It was the second single to be released from the album and became Lauper’s first #1 hit in the U.S. The song was written in the album’s final stages, after “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun”, “She Bop” and “All Through the Night” had been written. The writing began with the title, which Lauper had seen in TV Guide magazine, referring to the 1979 science fiction film Time After Time.

“Time After Time” is composed of simple keyboard-synth chords, bright, jangly guitars, clock-ticking percussion, and elastic bassline, and lyrically is a love song of devotion. Most music critics gave the song positive reviews, with most commending the song for being a solid and memorable love song, as well as considering the track Lauper’s best song. The song has been selected as one of the Best Love Songs of All Time by many media outlets, including Rolling Stone, Nerve, MTV and many others.[1] “Time After Time” was also nominated for a Grammy Award for Song of the Year at the 1985 edition.[2] The song was a success on the charts, becoming her first number-one single on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart on June 9, 1984, and remaining there for two weeks. Worldwide, the song is her most commercially successful single, after “Girls Just Want to Have Fun”, and reached number three on the UK Singles Chart and number six on the ARIA Singles Chart. The song is also known for its numerous covers by a wide range of artists, including Miles Davis, who recorded an instrumental version for his 1985 album You’re Under Arrest, and Eva Cassidy, whose cover of the song appears on her posthumous album of the same name. R&B singer Lil Mo also covered the song for her 2001 debut album Based on a True Story. An acoustic version was sung by Lauper with Sarah McLachlan on her 2005 album The Body Acoustic.[3] Lauper has performed the song live with Patti LaBelle twice in 1985 and 2004 and with Sarah McLachlan at the American Music Awards of 2005,[4] as well as with rapper Lil’ Kim in 2009. The song has been featured numerous times in popular culture including the films Napoleon Dynamite, View From the Top, Strictly Ballroom, Up In the Air, John Tucker Must Die, Prom Night, Clockstoppers, Ghosts of Girlfriends Past, Sunny, Paranoia, Good Deeds, Nebraska, Irresistible, This Is Where I Leave You, Brown Sugar, and Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion as well as the television shows Cold Case, Stars in Their Eyes, Smallville, Veronica Mars, The Simpsons, The New Adventures of Old Christine, Ugly Betty, EastEnders, Accused, Parks and Recreation, Atop the Fourth Wall, Psych, Defiance, Grey’s Anatomy, Glee and My Name is Earl.

Let’s Hear It for the Boy (song)

“Let’s Hear It for the Boy” was the second number-one song for Deniece Williams and appeared on the soundtrack to the feature film Footloose. It climbed to number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 on May 26, 1984, as well as number one on the dance and R&B charts,[2][3] and peaked at number two on the UK Singles Chart. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song, and was certified platinum in the US, gold in Canada and silver in the UK by the RIAA, Music Canada and the British Phonographic Industry respectively.[4][5][6] The music video for the song was released in mid-April 1984.[7] The tune features background vocals from George Merrill and Shannon Rubicam, who would go on to form the duo Boy Meets Girl.

Hello (Lionel Richie song)

“Hello” is a song by Lionel Richie. Taken as the third single from Richie’s multi-platinum album Can’t Slow Down, the song was released in 1984 and reached number one on three Billboard music charts: the pop chart (for two weeks), the R&B chart (for three weeks),[2] and the adult contemporary chart (for six weeks). The song also went to number one in the UK Singles Chart for six weeks.[3] The song later inspired a lawsuit by songwriter Marjorie Hoffman White, who accused Richie of plagiarizing her composition “I’m Not Ready to Go”.[4]

The song is memorable for the line “Hello, is it me you’re looking for?”. That phrase started the song’s composition, as James Anthony Carmichael visited Richie, and after the singer greeted him that way, Carmichael replied, “Finish that song.” Richie initially felt that the song was “corny” but ultimately “by the time I finished the verse, I fell in love with the song again.”[5] The guitar solo on the song was played by session guitarist Louie Shelton. In pop culture, the song is featured in the films Bitter Moon, The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Herbie: Fully Loaded, Scary Movie 4, Are We Done Yet?, Shrek Forever After, Hard Boiled, Colour Me Kubrick, Happy Feet, Paddington, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows. It’s also featured in the television shows Family Guy, Seinfeld, Community, and Glee as well in commercials for companies like Yahoo! and IKEA.

Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)

“Against All Odds (Take a Look at Me Now)” (also titled “Against All Odds”) is a song by English drummer, singer and songwriter Phil Collins. It was recorded for the soundtrack to the 1984 film of the same name. It is a power ballad in which its protagonist implores an ex-lover to “take a look at me now”, knowing that reconciliation is “against all odds” while considering it worth trying. The single reached number two in the United Kingdom, while it peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, the first of seven US number ones for Collins in his solo career.[4]

The song has been covered by several singers, some versions of which have been successful in both the US and UK markets. The song has twice reached number one in the UK singles chart: the pairing of Mariah Carey and boyband Westlife, in September 2000,[5] and then again by Steve Brookstein, the first winner of The X Factor, in January 2005.[6]

Footloose (song)

“Footloose” is a song co-written and recorded by American singer-songwriter Kenny Loggins. It was released in January 1984 as the first of two singles by Loggins from the 1984 film of the same name (the other one being “I’m Free (Heaven Helps the Man)”). The song spent three weeks at number one, March 31—April 14, 1984 on the US Billboard Hot 100, and was the first of two number-one hits from the motion picture, Footloose. Billboard ranked it at the No. 4 song for 1984.[2]

The song was very well received, and is one of the most recognizable songs recorded by Loggins. When the American Film Institute released its AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs, “Footloose” reached the 96th position. The song was covered by country music artist Blake Shelton for the 2011 remake of the 1984 film. The song has also been parodied by “Weird Al” Yankovic (“Hooked on Polkas”).[3] It was also made available as downloadable content for the Rock Band series. Kids Incorporated covered “Footloose” in 1984 in the Season 1 episode “Space Case”. PureNRG sang “Footloose” on their 2007 debut album PureNRG.

The single version is slightly shorter in length compared to the album version. It begins with a soloed guitar track instead of a drum intro, and features more prominent backing vocals in the mix, particularly towards the end of the song.

Jump (Van Halen song)

“Jump” is a song by the American rock band Van Halen. It was released in December 1983 as the lead single from their album 1984. It is Van Halen’s most successful single to date reaching number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.[4] The song differs from earlier Van Halen songs in that it is driven by a rolling synth line (played on an Oberheim OB-Xa), although the song does contain a guitar solo, which was spliced together from multiple takes.

David Lee Roth dedicated the song to martial artist Benny Urquidez, of whom he was a student.[5]

Karma Chameleon

“Karma Chameleon” is a song by English band Culture Club, featured on the group’s 1983 album Colour by Numbers. The single spent three weeks at number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 in early 1984, becoming the group’s biggest hit and only US number-one single among their many top 10 hits. “Karma Chameleon” was also a huge global hit, hitting number one in 16 countries worldwide, and the top 10 in several more. The sleeve features work from the photographer David Levine.

In the group’s home country of the United Kingdom, it became the second Culture Club single to reach the top of the UK Singles Chart (after “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me”), where it stayed for six weeks in September and October 1983, and became the UK’s biggest-selling single of the year 1983.[1] To date, it is the 31st best-selling single of all time in the UK, selling 1.49 million copies there.[2] It has sold over 5 million global copies, making it one of the best-selling singles of all time worldwide.[3]

Owner of a Lonely Heart

“Owner of a Lonely Heart” is a song by the English progressive rock band Yes. It is the first track and single from their eleventh studio album 90125, released in 1983. Written primarily by guitarist Trevor Rabin, contributions were made to the final version by singer Jon Anderson, bassist Chris Squire, and producer Trevor Horn.

“Owner of a Lonely Heart” was released in October 1983, as the album’s first single. It was a commercial success in the United States, becoming the band’s first and only single to reach No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and its Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.[2][3] In 1984, the song reached No. 8 in the year-end charts in the US.[4] The single was reissued various times throughout the 1980s and 1990s with different remix versions and B-sides.[5] The song has been sampled by various artists including Michael Jackson, Frank Zappa and Max Graham, whose 2005 single reached No. 9 in the UK.[6]

Say Say Say

“Say Say Say” is a song written and performed by Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson, released in 1983. The track was produced by George Martin for McCartney’s album, Pipes of Peace. The song was recorded during production of McCartney’s 1982 Tug of War album, about a year before the release of “The Girl Is Mine”, the pair’s first duet from Jackson’s album Thriller (1982).

After its release in October 1983, “Say Say Say” became Jackson’s seventh top-ten hit inside a year. It was a number one hit in the United States, Canada, Norway, Sweden, and several other countries, reached number two in the United Kingdom, and peaked within the top ten in Australia, Austria, New Zealand, The Netherlands, Switzerland, and over 20 other nations. In 2013, Billboard magazine listed the song as the 41st biggest hit of all-time on the Billboard Hot 100 charts.[1]

The single was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America in December 1983, representing sales of one million copies. The single was promoted with a music video directed by Bob Giraldi. The video, filmed in Santa Ynez Valley, California, features cameo appearances by Linda McCartney, La Toya Jackson and Giraldi. The short film centers around two con artists called “Mac and Jack” (played by McCartney and Jackson), and is credited for the introduction of dialogue and storyline to music videos.

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