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The Way It Is (song)

“The Way It Is” is a song recorded by Bruce Hornsby and the Range from their 1986 album The Way It Is. It topped the charts in the United States, Canada and the Netherlands in 1986,[1][2] and peaked inside the top twenty in such countries as Ireland, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Written by Bruce Hornsby, it made explicit reference to the American Civil Rights Movement.[3] Musically, the song is characterized by two long lyrical piano solos.

The Next Time I Fall

“The Next Time I Fall” is a 1986 Billboard Hot 100 No. 1 song written by Bobby Caldwell and Paul Gordon,[2] recorded as a duet by Peter Cetera and Amy Grant for Cetera’s 1986 album Solitude/Solitaire, and as a solo by Caldwell himself for his 1988 album Heart of Mine. The single reached No. 1 on both the Adult Contemporary chart and the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States.[3] It went to No. 1 in December 1986, remaining in that position for one week. It was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

As a duet, the song was Grant’s first of two No. 1 pop singles and her first foray into the secular music field (she had scored several No. 1 singles in Contemporary Christian Music previously). Grant released the song on her Greatest Hits 1986–2004 album and the music video on the corresponding Greatest Hits 1986-2004 DVD.

The music video was released in 1986 and shows Cetera and Grant singing in a room with people dancing.[citation needed] The video was directed by Dominic Sena.

You Give Love a Bad Name (song)

“You Give Love a Bad Name” is a song by American rock band Bon Jovi, released as the first single from their 1986 album Slippery When Wet. Written by Jon Bon Jovi, Richie Sambora and Desmond Child about a woman who has jilted her lover, the song reached No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 on November 29, 1986 to become the band’s first number one hit.[2] In 2007, the song reentered the charts at No. 29 after Blake Lewis performed it on American Idol. In 2009 it was named the 20th greatest hard rock song of all time by VH1.[1] Despite the lyrics of the chorus, the song should not be confused with “Shot Through the Heart”, an unrelated song from Bon Jovi’s 1984 self-titled debut album.

Human (The Human League song)

“Human” is a song recorded by British synthpop band The Human League, and released as the first single from their 1986 album Crash. The track, which deals with the subject of infidelity, was written and produced by Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis.[4]

In 1985, the recording sessions for the Human League’s fifth album were not going well, and the band did not like the results, which was causing internal conflict. Virgin Records executives, worried by the lack of progress from their at-the-time most profitable signing, suggested the band accept an offer to work with producers Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, who already had material to work with; and had expressed an interest in the band from their U.S. releases. Jam and Lewis had recently emerged as in-demand talent due to their success with Janet Jackson and her Control album.

Amanda (Boston song)

“Amanda” is a power ballad by the rock band Boston written by Tom Scholz. The song was released as the first single from the band’s third album, Third Stage, in 1986, a 6-year-delay after it was recorded.

Although the song did not have a promotional music video, “Amanda” became the band’s highest charting single in the United States and Canada. In the United States, the single topped the Billboard Hot 100 in November, 1986, for two consecutive weeks (the band’s only number 1 on the Hot 100),[2] and topped for three consecutive weeks on the Mainstream Rock chart, in October of the same year,[3] while in the latter the single topped RPM magazine’s Top Singles and Adult Contemporary charts.[4][5]

It was the band’s first officially released single since 1978 and their first released by MCA Records. The 12-string guitar parts are played by Scholz.

True Colors (Cyndi Lauper song)

“True Colors” is a song written by American songwriters Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly. It was both the title track and the first single released from American singer Cyndi Lauper’s second album. It was the only original song on the album that Lauper did not help write.[1]

“True Colors” spent two weeks in the number one spot on the Billboard Hot 100, and was the last single from Lauper to occupy the top of the chart. It received a Grammy Award nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

When I Think of You

“When I Think of You” is the third single from Janet Jackson’s third studio album, Control (1986). Written by Jackson and Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, and produced by Jam and Lewis, the song is about a person who finds relief and fun in a lover. It was Jackson’s first number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100, and also peaked at number ten in the United Kingdom.

The song was resurrected in 1995 when released on two limited-edition CD single formats in the United Kingdom, one containing remixes by Deep Dish and Heller & Farley, and the other containing remixes by David Morales. That same year these remixes were included on certain releases of “Runaway”. “When I Think of You” has been included in each of Jackson’s greatest hits albums, Design of a Decade: 1986–1996 (1995), Number Ones (2009) and Icon: Number Ones (2010).

Stuck with You

“Stuck with You” is a hit single by Huey Lewis and the News, written by guitarist Chris Hayes and lead singer Huey Lewis, released in 1986. It was the first single from the band’s fourth album, Fore!. The song spent three weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 from September 14 to October 3, 1986.[1] The single was the band’s second number-one hit on the Hot 100 chart, following “The Power of Love” in 1985. The song reached number 12 on the UK Singles Chart.

The music video for “Stuck with You” was filmed in the Bahamas and features Keely Shaye Smith. The island that Lewis and Smith wind up on is a small island about ten miles from Paradise Island in Nassau. The video was filmed on land, on water, underwater and from the air. The band, the crew and all the extras used in the island barbecue scene had to stay on a barge moored off the island so that they wouldn’t be seen.

The video was directed by Edd Griles, who had previously directed the band’s video for “The Heart of Rock & Roll” as well as Cyndi Lauper’s “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” and “Time After Time”.

An instrumental 8-bit version from this song was featured as the closing theme from the episode “The Creator”, last episode from the comedy animation series “Sonic For Hire”, produced by LowBrow Studios from 2010 to 2013.

Take My Breath Away

“Take My Breath Away” is a song written by Giorgio Moroder and Tom Whitlock for the film Top Gun, performed by the band Berlin.[1] It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song,[1] as well as the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song in 1986.

Once Giorgio Moroder wrote the musical backing to what would become “Take My Breath Away”, lyricist Tom Whitlock wrote the lyrics driving home from the studio, and then spent a few hours at home polishing them. The demo done with a background singer impressed director Tony Scott and producers Jerry Bruckheimer and Don Simpson, who decided to film more romantic scenes between Tom Cruise and Kelly McGillis to feature the song.[2]

The song was originally offered to The Motels; they released their original demo on their compilation album Anthologyland.[3] Columbia Records suggested some of their signed artists, but eventually Moroder thought of the band Berlin, whose hit song “No More Words” he had produced. Whitlock did a few lyrical changes before Terri Nunn recorded the vocals.[2] Moroder said that he is most proud of this song, of all the other hits he has had in his career.[4]

Venus (Shocking Blue song)

“Venus” is a 1969 song written by Robbie van Leeuwen. In 1970, the Dutch rock band Shocking Blue took the song to number one in nine countries. In 1981 it was sampled as part of the Stars on 45 medley. In 1986, the British female pop group Bananarama returned the song to number one in seven countries. The composition has been featured in numerous films, television shows and commercials, and covered dozens of times by artists around the world.

Higher Love

“Higher Love” is a 1986 song by English singer Steve Winwood.[1] It was the first single released from his fourth solo LP, Back in the High Life. It was written by Winwood and Will Jennings, and produced by Russ Titelman and Winwood. The female vocals on the song were performed by Chaka Khan, who also appeared in the promotional music video.

“Higher Love” was Winwood’s first Billboard Hot 100 number-one hit, topping the chart for one week. It was preceded by Madonna’s “Papa Don’t Preach” and followed by “Venus” by Bananarama. The song also spent four weeks atop the US Billboard Album Rock Tracks chart. It peaked at number 13 in the United Kingdom, his highest charting solo hit there. It also earned two Grammy Awards for Record of the Year and Best Male Pop Vocal Performance.

Papa Don’t Preach

“Papa Don’t Preach” is a song by American singer Madonna from her third studio album True Blue (1986). The song was written by Brian Elliot with additional lyrics by Madonna, and produced by Stephen Bray and Madonna. The song also appears remixed on the 1990 compilation album The Immaculate Collection and in its original form on the 2009 compilation album Celebration. The song’s musical style combines pop and classical styling, and its lyrics deal with teenage pregnancy and abortion. It was based on teen gossip Elliot heard outside his studio, which has a large front window that doubles as a mirror where schoolgirls from the North Hollywood High School in Los Angeles regularly stopped to fix their hair and chat.

Released as the album’s second single in mid-1986, the song was a commercial success. It became Madonna’s fourth number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100, and performed well internationally, reaching the top position in the United Kingdom and Australia. It was well received by music critics and was frequently cited as a highlight in the album. The music video, directed by James Foley, shows Madonna’s second image makeover, featuring her with a more toned and muscular body, and cropped platinum blonde hair. It portrayed a storyline where Madonna is trying to tell her father about her pregnancy. The images are juxtaposed with shots of Madonna dancing and singing in a small, darkened studio, and spending a romantic evening with her boyfriend.

Shortly after its release, the song caused heated discussions about its lyrical content. Women’s organizations and others in the family planning field criticized Madonna for encouraging teenage pregnancy, while groups opposed to abortion saw the song as having a positive pro-life message. Madonna has performed “Papa Don’t Preach” in four of her world tours, most recently The MDNA Tour in 2012. The song also caused her first conflict with the Vatican, as she dedicated it to Pope John Paul II, who urged Italian fans to boycott her concerts during the Who’s That Girl World Tour in 1987. In 2002, British singer Kelly Osbourne recorded a hard rock cover of the song which was included as a bonus track on her debut album Shut Up.

Glory of Love

“Glory of Love” is a 1986 Billboard Hot 100 #1 hit song written and composed by Peter Cetera, David Foster, and Cetera’s then wife Diane Nini, and recorded by Cetera shortly after he left the band Chicago to pursue a solo career. Featured in the 1986 film The Karate Kid, Part II, it was Cetera’s first hit single after he left the team, and it was included on his 1986 album, Solitude/Solitaire, which Michael Omartian produced. (Cetera released this album to coincide with the theatrical release of The Karate Kid, Part II.)

According to Cetera, he originally wrote and composed “Glory of Love” as the end title for the 1985 film Rocky IV, but was passed over by United Artists, and instead it was used as the theme for The Karate Kid, Part II.[2][3]

“Glory of Love” peaked at number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart on August 2, 1986, remaining in that spot for two weeks. It also spent five weeks atop the U.S. adult contemporary chart.[4] The song achieved similar success in the UK, peaking at number three on the UK Singles Chart,[5] where it was the 26th best-selling single of 1986.

The version released as a single and featured on Cetera’s album Solitude/Solitaire is edited, missing the beginning eight-second section of the song’s bridge which is heard in The Karate Kid, Part II. He performed a shortened version of the song live at the 59th Academy Awards ceremony, which took place on Monday, March 30, 1987 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.[6] [7]

Sledgehammer (Peter Gabriel song)

“Sledgehammer” is a song written, composed and performed by English rock musician Peter Gabriel, which appeared on his 1986 album So, produced by Gabriel and Daniel Lanois. It hit No. 1 in Canada on 21 July 1986, where it spent four weeks; No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States on 26 July 1986;[4] and No. 4 on the UK Singles Chart, thanks in part to a popular and influential music video. It was his biggest hit in North America and ties with “Games Without Frontiers” as his biggest hit in the United Kingdom.

The song’s music video won a record nine MTV Awards at the 1987 MTV Video Music Awards[5] and Best British Video at the 1987 Brit Awards.[6][7] Gabriel was also nominated for three Grammy Awards: Best Male Rock Vocal Performance, Song of the Year and Record of the Year.[8] As of 2011, “Sledgehammer” is the most played music video in the history of MTV.[6]

Invisible Touch (song)

“Invisible Touch” is the title track and first single from the 1986 album of the same name by the English rock band Genesis. The song is a group composition which featured lyrics written by singer and drummer Phil Collins.[1]

It is the most successful single in the band’s career and was their first and only No. 1 single in the United States; the song additionally spent three consecutive weeks at the top of the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay chart during summer 1986 until it was surpassed by Peter Cetera’s “Glory of Love”. The song was the first of five consecutive U.S. Top Five singles from the album of the same name.[2][3] It also reached No. 4 in Canada and No. 15 in the United Kingdom.[4] Its B-side is the second part of “Domino”, titled “The Last Domino”. (The album includes both parts of “Domino” combined together.)

Genesis members Phil Collins and Mike Rutherford have both spoken highly of the song in retrospect. Collins has called it his “favourite Genesis song” and Rutherford has called it “a wonderful song: upbeat, fun to play, always a strong moment in any gig”.[1] As the band’s only Billboard Hot 100 number one, the song is included in Rock Song Index: The 7500 Most Important Songs for the Rock and Roll Era.[5]

Holding Back the Years

“Holding Back the Years” is the 7th track of Simply Red’s debut studio album Picture Book (1985). It remains their most successful single, having reached #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and #2 on the UK Singles Chart. It is one of two Simply Red songs (the other being their cover of “If You Don’t Know Me by Now”) to reach #1 in the US. “Holding Back the Years” had initially been released in the UK the year before, reaching #51. The song was nominated in the category of Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocals at the 29th Annual Grammy Awards.

There’ll Be Sad Songs (To Make You Cry)

“There’ll Be Sad Songs (To Make You Cry)” is a 1986 single by Billy Ocean. The song was written and produced by Wayne Brathwaite and Barry Eastmond; Ocean was also credited as a co-writer for the song. It appears on Ocean’s 1986 album Love Zone, which was released on Jive Records. The song went to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for the week beginning 5 July 1986, where it remained for one week, becoming the 600th song to ascend to that position. It also topped the adult contemporary and R&B charts in the United States that same summer.

On My Own (Patti LaBelle and Michael McDonald song)

“On My Own” was a Billboard #1 hit duet by singers Patti LaBelle and Michael McDonald when it was released as a single in 1986. It was released from LaBelle’s first platinum album, Winner in You and was written and produced by Burt Bacharach and his former wife Carole Bayer Sager. The song was originally recorded by singer Dionne Warwick for inclusion on her album Friends. It is unclear why the song was not included on the final track list. The song was based on a relationship that had reached its end with both parties going their separate ways in a melancholy state with the occasional option of coming back together again one day.

It was often stated the two performers were in separate cities when they recorded their individual parts which were then “married” during mixing. This was reflected in the music video produced to promote the song, which depicted LaBelle and McDonald performing the song simultaneously on different coasts.[1] The singers were shown on separate sides of a split screen, each singing the song while walking through apartments which had identical layouts but different decor and furniture. The views from their respective porches, where they finished the song, made clear their separation by the continent.

Live to Tell

“Live to Tell” is a song by American singer Madonna from her third studio album True Blue (1986). Originally composed by Patrick Leonard for the score of the film Fire with Fire, the song was shown to Madonna, who decided to use it for then-husband Sean Penn’s film At Close Range. Madonna wrote the song’s lyrics and co-produced it with Leonard. The song was released as the lead single from True Blue on March 26, 1986 by Sire Records. It later appeared on compilation albums The Immaculate Collection (1990), Something to Remember (1995), and Celebration (2009).

A pop ballad, the song includes instrumentation from guitars, keyboards, drums and a synthesizer, and its lyrics deal with deceit, mistrust and childhood scars. It is also about being strong, which Madonna recalled in an interview that she thought about her relationship with her parents, while writing the lyrics. The music video, directed by James Foley, shows Madonna’s first image makeover, featuring her with a cleaner look, shoulder-length wavy golden blond hair, conservative wardrobe and subtle make-up. This toned down blond appearance was again inspired by Marilyn Monroe.

“Live to Tell” was generally well received by music critics, who frequently referred to it as the best ballad of her career. It was also a commercial success, becoming Madonna’s third number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100 and her first number-one on the Adult Contemporary chart. The song faced controversy when Madonna performed it on her 2006 Confessions Tour wearing a crown of thorns while hanging on a giant mirrored cross. The performance at Rome’s Olympic Stadium was condemned as an act of hostility toward the Roman Catholic Church by religious leaders.

The Greatest Love of All

“The Greatest Love of All” is a song written by composers Michael Masser (music) and Linda Creed (lyrics). It was originally recorded in 1977 by American singer and guitarist George Benson, who made the song a substantial hit, peaking at #2 on the R&B chart that year, the first R&B chart Top Ten hit for Arista Records. Eight years later, the song became even more well known for a version by Whitney Houston, whose 1985 cover (with the slightly amended title “Greatest Love of All”) eventually topped the charts, peaking at #1 in Australia, Canada and the U.S. in 1986, reaching #1 on the R&B chart, also by Arista Records.

West End Girls

“West End Girls” is a song by British pop duo Pet Shop Boys. Written by Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe, the song was released twice as a single. The song is influenced by hip hop music, with lyrics concerned with class and the pressures of inner-city life which were inspired partly by T. S. Eliot’s poem The Waste Land. It was generally well received by contemporary music critics and has been frequently cited as a highlight in the duo’s career.

The first version of the song was produced by Bobby Orlando and was released on Columbia Records’ Bobcat Records imprint in April 1984, becoming a club hit in the United States and some European countries. After the duo signed with EMI, the song was re-recorded with producer Stephen Hague for their first studio album, Please. In October 1985, the new version was released, reaching number one in the United Kingdom and the United States in 1986.

In 1987, the song won Best Single at the Brit Awards, and Best International Hit at the Ivor Novello Awards. In 2005, 20 years after its release, the song was awarded Song of The Decade between the years 1985 and 1994 by the British Academy of Composers and Songwriters. In 2015 the song was voted by the British public as the nation’s 12th favourite 1980s number one in a poll for ITV.[2]

The song was performed by Pet Shop Boys at the 2012 Summer Olympics closing ceremony[3] and was included as part of the soundtrack of the 2013 game Grand Theft Auto V on the Non-Stop-Pop radio station.[4]

Addicted to Love (song)

“Addicted to Love” is a song by English rock singer Robert Palmer released in 1986. It has become his signature song, thanks in part to a popular video featuring high fashion models.[2] Other artists have since released versions of it.

It is the third song on Palmer’s Riptide album. The version released for commercial radio play is about four minutes long, while the album version runs a little over six minutes.

The song entered the Billboard Hot 100 chart the week ending 8 February 1986. The song ended up topping the Billboard Hot 100, as well as the Billboard Top Rock Tracks chart. It was one of the last 45 RPM singles to receive a million-selling Gold certification. It also reached number one in Australia and number five on the UK Singles Chart.

Kiss (Prince song)

“Kiss” is a 1986 single by Prince and The Revolution, from the album Parade.

The song ranked number 464 on the Rolling Stone list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[2] NME ranked the song number 4 in their list of The 150 Greatest Singles of All Time.[citation needed] The same magazine voted “Kiss” the best single of the year 1986.[3]

Following Prince’s death, the song re-charted on the Billboard Hot 100 at number 28 and jumped to number 23 the week after. The song also reached number two on the French Singles Chart. As of April 30, 2016, it has sold 1,330,336 copies in the United States.[4]

Age of Chance and The Art of Noise also released versions of the song that were critical and chart successes.

Rock Me Amadeus

“Rock Me Amadeus” is a 1985 song by Austrian musician Falco from his album Falco 3. It topped the singles charts on both sides of the Atlantic. It was Falco’s only number one hit in both the United States and the United Kingdom, despite the artist’s popularity in Germany, his native Austria, and much of Europe. The song was written by Falco and Dutch music producers Bolland & Bolland.

These Dreams

“These Dreams” is a song by the American rock band Heart. It was released as a single in 1986 from their 1985 self-titled album. It was the first song by the band to become a number one hit on the Billboard Hot 100.[2]

In 1985 Martin Page (who co-wrote several other pop hits, including “We Built This City” and “King of Wishful Thinking”) and Bernie Taupin (longtime collaborator of Elton John) wrote the music and lyrics to the song now known as “These Dreams”.[3] The song was offered to Stevie Nicks, who expressed no interest in recording it.[4] Heart had just recently signed with Capitol Records. While the band had previously recorded their own material, they were impressed by “These Dreams” and agreed to use it on their upcoming album.

“These Dreams” was different from earlier Heart songs: it was a polished, power ballad; and it was the first Heart single on which Nancy Wilson performed lead vocals instead of Ann Wilson. According to The Billboard Book of Number One Hits by Fred Bronson, when it came time for Nancy Wilson to record her vocal, she was suffering from a cold and her voice sounded somewhat raspy and gravelly. After the song reached its peak of success, producers reportedly wanted Nancy to recreate the gravelly sound on future recordings, asking her, “Can’t you just get sick again?”[2]

Sara (Starship song)

“Sara” is a song recorded by the American rock band Starship which reached number-one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart on March 15, 1986. It was sung only by Mickey Thomas, of the newly renamed band Starship, from their first album Knee Deep in the Hoopla; for this single, Grace Slick only provided the backing vocals.[1]

The recording became one of the best-selling singles of 1986 in NorthAmerica, meanwhile in Europe and Australia it received poor reception, specially in the United Kingdom. The song debuted at number 39 on January 18, 1986 and stayed at the top position for one week. It was the band’s second number-one hit after the song “We Built This City” hit the mark a few months earlier in 1985. It also became the band’s first number-one song on the adult contemporary chart, where it remained for three weeks.[2] Although written by Peter and Ina Wolf, the song was named for Thomas’s wife at the time, Sara (née Kendrick).

Kyrie (song)

“Kyrie” is a song by American pop rock band Mr. Mister, from their 1985 album Welcome to the Real World. Released in late 1985, it hit the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100 charts in March 1986, where it was #1 for two weeks. It also hit the top spot on the Billboard Top Rock Tracks chart for one week. In the UK the song peaked at #11 in April 1986.

The words to “Kyrie” were written by Arizona-born lyricist John Lang who co-wrote the songs on all of Mr. Mister’s albums. The music was composed by Richard Page and Steve George while on tour with Adam Ant.

Kýrie, eléison means “Lord, have mercy” in Greek, and is a part of many liturgical rites in Eastern and Western Christianity. Kýrie, eléison; Christé, eléison; Kýrie, eléison is a prayer that asks “Lord, have mercy; Christ, have mercy; Lord, have mercy”.[3] According to Page the entire song is, essentially, a prayer.[4]

There is a myth that singer Richard Page wrote this song while lying in a hospital bed following an attack. John Lang has stated that he was the one who was attacked, three years before “Kyrie” was written, and that the incident has nothing to do with the song.[5]

The video for this song was directed by Nick Morris, and features the band in performance mixed with footage taken at the tail end of their Fall 1985 tour with Tina Turner.[6]

The USA 7″ single can be found pressed on transparent purple vinyl or polystyrene, depending on where it was manufactured.

How Will I Know

“How Will I Know” is a song recorded by American recording artist Whitney Houston for her debut album, titled Whitney Houston, which was released in February 1985. It was released by Arista Records in November that year, as the album’s third single. Composed by George Merrill and Shannon Rubicam, the song was originally intended for Janet Jackson, but she passed on it. Houston then recorded the song with altered lyrics and production from Narada Michael Walden. The lyrics speak about the protagonist trying to discern if a boy she likes will ever like her back.

“How Will I Know” received mainly positive reviews. The song became Houston’s second number one single on the United States Billboard Hot 100. It spent two weeks atop the chart and also became Houston’s first chart topper on the Canadian RPM Singles Chart. Success was worldwide: it reached the top 10 in Sweden, Ireland, Norway, and the United Kingdom, and the top 20 in the Netherlands, New Zealand, and Switzerland.

The song’s music video features scenes of Houston dancing in a setting of video screens and colored partitions. The music video gave Houston exposure to the teens and MTV. It also received nominations at the 1986 MTV Video Music Awards in the categories of Best Female Video and Best New Artist in a Video, winning the former category. The song was performed on many of her tours including Greatest Love Tour (1986) and her Nothing but Love World Tour (2009–10). “How Will I Know” is also featured as a remix on Houston’s compilation album, Whitney: The Greatest Hits (2000), whereas the original version is featured on The Ultimate Collection (2007) and I Will Always Love You: The Best of Whitney Houston (2012; remastered).

That’s What Friends Are For

“That’s What Friends Are For” is a song written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager. It was first recorded in 1982 by Rod Stewart for the soundtrack of the film Night Shift, but it is better known for the 1985 remake version by Dionne Warwick and Friends.

A one-off collaboration headed by Dionne Warwick and featuring Gladys Knight, Elton John, and Stevie Wonder, released as a charity single in the United Kingdom and the United States in 1985, it was recorded as a benefit for American Foundation for AIDS Research, and raised over US$3 million for that cause. The song peaked at number one for three weeks on the soul chart and for four weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 in January 1986[1] – becoming the final US number one for all but John – and became Billboard’s number one single of 1986. In the U.S., it was certified Gold on January 15, 1986 by the RIAA. Elton John played piano and Stevie Wonder played harmonica; the two previously worked together for 1983’s I Guess That’s Why They Call It The Blues. In 1988, the Washington Post wrote, “So working against AIDS, especially after years of raising money for work on many blood-related diseases such as sickle-cell anemia, seemed the right thing to do. ‘You have to be granite not to want to help people with AIDS, because the devastation that it causes is so painful to see. I was so hurt to see my friend die with such agony,’ Warwick remembers. ‘I am tired of hurting and it does hurt.'”

Say You, Say Me

“Say You, Say Me” is a song written and recorded by Lionel Richie for the film White Nights, starring Mikhail Baryshnikov and Gregory Hines.[1] The single hit number 1 in the US[2] and on the R&B singles chart[3] in December 1985. It became Richie’s ninth number one on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart.[4] The track is not available on the soundtrack album to the film, because Motown did not want Richie’s first single since the Can’t Slow Down album to appear on another record label. It finally appeared on the Dancing on the Ceiling album released in 1986. A 50 sec clip was used in an episode of TV show “Valerie” in 1987.

The track won an Academy Award for Best Original Song and a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song as well.[1] A music video was also made for the song.

In 2008, the song was ranked at #74 of the top songs of all time on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, commemorating the first 50 years of the chart.[5]

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