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Heaven Is a Place on Earth

“Heaven Is a Place on Earth” is a song by American singer Belinda Carlisle, featured on her second studio album, Heaven on Earth (1987). Written by Rick Nowels and Ellen Shipley, the song was released as the album’s lead single in September 1987, and it hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on December 5, 1987, becoming Carlisle’s only US chart-topper. A month later it hit number one on the UK Singles Chart and held the spot for two weeks.

The song reached number one in many other countries, among them Switzerland, Ireland, Sweden, South Africa and Norway. The song also reached number three in Germany and Canada, number two in Australia, and number six in Italy. It is widely considered to be Carlisle’s signature song because of its success on the charts and its continued relevance today. The song was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life

“(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life” is a song composed by Franke Previte, John DeNicola, and Donald Markowitz.[2] It was recorded by Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes, and used as the theme song for the 1987 film Dirty Dancing.[2] The song has won a number of awards, including an Academy Award for “Best Original Song”, a Golden Globe Award for “Best Original Song” from Golden Globe, and a Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

Mony Mony

“Mony Mony” is a 1968 single by American pop rock band Tommy James and the Shondells,[2] which reached No. 1 in the UK Singles Chart[1] while also getting serious airplay in the U.S. and Canada. Written by Bobby Bloom, Ritchie Cordell, Bo Gentry, and Tommy James, the song has appeared in various film and television works such as the Oliver Stone drama Heaven & Earth.[3] It was also notably covered by English singer-songwriter Billy Idol in 1981. Idol’s version, which took in more of a new wave and power pop sound, became an international top 40 hit and additionally revived public interest in the original garage rock single. A month after his live 1987 hit version, another Tommy James song had also hit number 1 – Tiffany’s version of “I Think We’re Alone Now”.

I Think We’re Alone Now

“I Think We’re Alone Now” is a song written and composed by Ritchie Cordell that was the title selection for a highly successful album released by the American recording artists Tommy James and the Shondells. “I Think We’re Alone Now” was a 1967 US hit for James and the Shondells, reaching number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song has since been covered several times by other artists. The late 1987 recording by Tiffany reached number 1 on the charts of various countries including the US, UK, Canada, and New Zealand. One month earlier, another Tommy James song had also hit number 1 – Billy Idol’s version of “Mony, Mony.” Other cover versions have also charted, including those by The Rubinoos (number 45 US, 1977) and Girls Aloud (number 4 UK, 2006).

Bad (Michael Jackson song)

“Bad” is a song by an American singer Michael Jackson. “Bad” was released by Epic Records on September 7, 1987, as the second single from Jackson’s third major-label and seventh studio album of the same name. The song was written and composed by Jackson and co-produced by Quincy Jones and Jackson. Jackson stated that the song was influenced by a real-life story he had read about.

“Bad” was well received by contemporary music critics, with some critics noting that “Bad” helped Jackson’s image become edgier during the Bad-era. The song peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100, and remained at the top position of the chart for two weeks, becoming Jackson’s Bad album’s second number one single, and Jackson’s eighth number one entry on the chart. Internationally, the song was also commercially successful, charting within the top ten in eleven countries as well as charting within the top five in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Norwegian, Switzerland and Swedish charts. The song peaked at number one on the Netherlands and European charts.

The full version of the music video for “Bad”, released in August 1987, and broadcast as a CBS prime time special, was directed entirely by Martin Scorsese[1] and co-starred Wesley Snipes in one of his first appearances prior to being discovered as an actor. The video portrays Michael Jackson and various backup dancers shown performing complex choreography in a subway station. “Bad” has been covered and parodied by many different artists since its release and has become a song used frequently in tributes to Jackson after his death in June 2009.

The song is featured in the 2010 animated film Megamind. It is also featured in the first theatrical trailer for the 2016 animated film The Angry Birds Movie.

Lost in Emotion

“Lost in Emotion” is a song recorded by Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam that appeared on their 1987 album Spanish Fly. The song hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on October 17, 1987. The song was their second number-one single (having scored this first earlier in the year with “Head to Toe”). The song also went to number one on the Black Singles chart,[1] and number eight on the dance chart.[2]

Full Force member Lou George describes “Lost in Emotion” as “a combination” of two Mary Wells’ hits: “Two Lovers” and “You Beat Me to the Punch”, an idea which occurred to George as the result of his playing Wells’ Greatest Hits album on which “Two Lovers” and “You Beat Me to the Punch” were sequential tracks. George – “We didn’t steal the riffs: all we did was get the flavoring…We [used] a xylophone and some bells because back in the Motown days they always used those simple instruments.”[3]

Here I Go Again

“Here I Go Again” is a song by British rock band Whitesnake. Originally released on their 1982 album, Saints & Sinners, the song was re-recorded for their eponymous 1987 album Whitesnake. The song was re-recorded again that year in a new “radio-mix” version. The 1987 album version hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on 10 October 1987,[2] and number nine on the UK Singles Chart on 28 November 1987. The 1987 version also hit number one on the Canadian Singles Chart on 24 October 1987. In 2006, the 1987 version was ranked number 17 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of the ’80s.[3]

Didn’t We Almost Have It All

“Didn’t We Almost Have It All” is the second single from Whitney Houston’s second album Whitney. The song was written by Michael Masser and Will Jennings and was released in August 1987. It received a Grammy nomination for Song of the Year.

Originally, another song was to be released as the second single, “For the Love of You,” but Arista Records decided to release “Didn’t We Almost Have It All” instead because all Houston’s singles had to be original material at this point of her career.[1]

The single was number one for two weeks on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart even though there was not a video for the song. A live performance of the song recorded during Houston’s successful 1987–1988 Moment of Truth World Tour was played on MTV, VH1, and BET. The performance is from her September 2, 1987 concert in Saratoga Springs, New York. The recorded performance was also televised along with her performance of “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” at the 1987 MTV Video Music Awards on September 11. It was widely speculated that the song is about Houston’s relationship with then NFL star Randall Cunningham.

I Just Can’t Stop Loving You

“I Just Can’t Stop Loving You” is a 1987 ballad by Michael Jackson featuring a duet with Siedah Garrett, and was the first single released from his seventh album, Bad. The song was written by Jackson, and co-produced by Jackson and Quincy Jones. It reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100, R&B and adult contemporary charts.

The song became the first of five consecutive number-one Hot 100 singles from the Bad album. It was Jackson’s second number-one song on the AC chart (his first, coincidentally, had also been a duet: 1982’s “The Girl Is Mine” with Paul McCartney).[1] It was released without an accompanying music video.

The presence of Garrett on the track was a last-minute decision by Jackson and Jones, after Jackson’s first two choices for the duet, Barbra Streisand and Whitney Houston, both decided against participating. Garrett, a protégé of Jones’s who co-wrote another song on Bad, “Man in the Mirror”, did not know that she would be singing the song until the day of the recording session. It became her first hit since Dennis Edwards’ 1984 song “Don’t Look Any Further”.

Jackson and Garrett later recorded “Todo Mi Amor Eres Tú”, a Spanish-language version of the song, with lyrics translated by Rubén Blades, and “Je Ne Veux Pas La Fin De Nous”, a French-language version, with translation by Christine “Coco” Decroix. All three versions are featured on the 2012 reissue album Bad 25. The original English-language version was re-released as a single in 2012, as part of the Bad 25 release.

La Bamba (song)

“La Bamba” (pronounced: [la ˈβamba]) is a Mexican folk song, originally from the state of Veracruz, best known from a 1958 adaptation by Ritchie Valens, a top 40 hit in the U.S. charts and one of early rock and roll’s best-known songs. Valens’ version of “La Bamba” is ranked number 354 on Rolling Stone magazine′s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It is the only song on the list sung in a language other than English.

“La Bamba” has been covered by numerous artists, most notably by Los Lobos, whose version was the title track of the 1987 film La Bamba and reached No. 1 in the U.S. and UK singles charts in the same year. The Los Lobos version remained No. 1 for three weeks in the summer of 1987. The music video for Los Lobos’ version, directed by Sherman Halsey, won the 1988 MTV Video Music Award for Best Video from a Film.

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