eurohitlist.eu

Heaven Is a Place on Earth

“Heaven Is a Place on Earth” is a song by American singer Belinda Carlisle, featured on her second studio album, Heaven on Earth (1987). Written by Rick Nowels and Ellen Shipley, the song was released as the album’s lead single in September 1987, and it hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on December 5, 1987, becoming Carlisle’s only US chart-topper. A month later it hit number one on the UK Singles Chart and held the spot for two weeks.

The song reached number one in many other countries, among them Switzerland, Ireland, Sweden, South Africa and Norway. The song also reached number three in Germany and Canada, number two in Australia, and number six in Italy. It is widely considered to be Carlisle’s signature song because of its success on the charts and its continued relevance today. The song was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life

“(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life” is a song composed by Franke Previte, John DeNicola, and Donald Markowitz.[2] It was recorded by Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes, and used as the theme song for the 1987 film Dirty Dancing.[2] The song has won a number of awards, including an Academy Award for “Best Original Song”, a Golden Globe Award for “Best Original Song” from Golden Globe, and a Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

Mony Mony

“Mony Mony” is a 1968 single by American pop rock band Tommy James and the Shondells,[2] which reached No. 1 in the UK Singles Chart[1] while also getting serious airplay in the U.S. and Canada. Written by Bobby Bloom, Ritchie Cordell, Bo Gentry, and Tommy James, the song has appeared in various film and television works such as the Oliver Stone drama Heaven & Earth.[3] It was also notably covered by English singer-songwriter Billy Idol in 1981. Idol’s version, which took in more of a new wave and power pop sound, became an international top 40 hit and additionally revived public interest in the original garage rock single. A month after his live 1987 hit version, another Tommy James song had also hit number 1 – Tiffany’s version of “I Think We’re Alone Now”.

I Think We’re Alone Now

“I Think We’re Alone Now” is a song written and composed by Ritchie Cordell that was the title selection for a highly successful album released by the American recording artists Tommy James and the Shondells. “I Think We’re Alone Now” was a 1967 US hit for James and the Shondells, reaching number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song has since been covered several times by other artists. The late 1987 recording by Tiffany reached number 1 on the charts of various countries including the US, UK, Canada, and New Zealand. One month earlier, another Tommy James song had also hit number 1 – Billy Idol’s version of “Mony, Mony.” Other cover versions have also charted, including those by The Rubinoos (number 45 US, 1977) and Girls Aloud (number 4 UK, 2006).

Bad (Michael Jackson song)

“Bad” is a song by an American singer Michael Jackson. “Bad” was released by Epic Records on September 7, 1987, as the second single from Jackson’s third major-label and seventh studio album of the same name. The song was written and composed by Jackson and co-produced by Quincy Jones and Jackson. Jackson stated that the song was influenced by a real-life story he had read about.

“Bad” was well received by contemporary music critics, with some critics noting that “Bad” helped Jackson’s image become edgier during the Bad-era. The song peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100, and remained at the top position of the chart for two weeks, becoming Jackson’s Bad album’s second number one single, and Jackson’s eighth number one entry on the chart. Internationally, the song was also commercially successful, charting within the top ten in eleven countries as well as charting within the top five in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Norwegian, Switzerland and Swedish charts. The song peaked at number one on the Netherlands and European charts.

The full version of the music video for “Bad”, released in August 1987, and broadcast as a CBS prime time special, was directed entirely by Martin Scorsese[1] and co-starred Wesley Snipes in one of his first appearances prior to being discovered as an actor. The video portrays Michael Jackson and various backup dancers shown performing complex choreography in a subway station. “Bad” has been covered and parodied by many different artists since its release and has become a song used frequently in tributes to Jackson after his death in June 2009.

The song is featured in the 2010 animated film Megamind. It is also featured in the first theatrical trailer for the 2016 animated film The Angry Birds Movie.

Lost in Emotion

“Lost in Emotion” is a song recorded by Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam that appeared on their 1987 album Spanish Fly. The song hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on October 17, 1987. The song was their second number-one single (having scored this first earlier in the year with “Head to Toe”). The song also went to number one on the Black Singles chart,[1] and number eight on the dance chart.[2]

Full Force member Lou George describes “Lost in Emotion” as “a combination” of two Mary Wells’ hits: “Two Lovers” and “You Beat Me to the Punch”, an idea which occurred to George as the result of his playing Wells’ Greatest Hits album on which “Two Lovers” and “You Beat Me to the Punch” were sequential tracks. George – “We didn’t steal the riffs: all we did was get the flavoring…We [used] a xylophone and some bells because back in the Motown days they always used those simple instruments.”[3]

Here I Go Again

“Here I Go Again” is a song by British rock band Whitesnake. Originally released on their 1982 album, Saints & Sinners, the song was re-recorded for their eponymous 1987 album Whitesnake. The song was re-recorded again that year in a new “radio-mix” version. The 1987 album version hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on 10 October 1987,[2] and number nine on the UK Singles Chart on 28 November 1987. The 1987 version also hit number one on the Canadian Singles Chart on 24 October 1987. In 2006, the 1987 version was ranked number 17 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of the ’80s.[3]

Didn’t We Almost Have It All

“Didn’t We Almost Have It All” is the second single from Whitney Houston’s second album Whitney. The song was written by Michael Masser and Will Jennings and was released in August 1987. It received a Grammy nomination for Song of the Year.

Originally, another song was to be released as the second single, “For the Love of You,” but Arista Records decided to release “Didn’t We Almost Have It All” instead because all Houston’s singles had to be original material at this point of her career.[1]

The single was number one for two weeks on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart even though there was not a video for the song. A live performance of the song recorded during Houston’s successful 1987–1988 Moment of Truth World Tour was played on MTV, VH1, and BET. The performance is from her September 2, 1987 concert in Saratoga Springs, New York. The recorded performance was also televised along with her performance of “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” at the 1987 MTV Video Music Awards on September 11. It was widely speculated that the song is about Houston’s relationship with then NFL star Randall Cunningham.

I Just Can’t Stop Loving You

“I Just Can’t Stop Loving You” is a 1987 ballad by Michael Jackson featuring a duet with Siedah Garrett, and was the first single released from his seventh album, Bad. The song was written by Jackson, and co-produced by Jackson and Quincy Jones. It reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100, R&B and adult contemporary charts.

The song became the first of five consecutive number-one Hot 100 singles from the Bad album. It was Jackson’s second number-one song on the AC chart (his first, coincidentally, had also been a duet: 1982’s “The Girl Is Mine” with Paul McCartney).[1] It was released without an accompanying music video.

The presence of Garrett on the track was a last-minute decision by Jackson and Jones, after Jackson’s first two choices for the duet, Barbra Streisand and Whitney Houston, both decided against participating. Garrett, a protégé of Jones’s who co-wrote another song on Bad, “Man in the Mirror”, did not know that she would be singing the song until the day of the recording session. It became her first hit since Dennis Edwards’ 1984 song “Don’t Look Any Further”.

Jackson and Garrett later recorded “Todo Mi Amor Eres Tú”, a Spanish-language version of the song, with lyrics translated by Rubén Blades, and “Je Ne Veux Pas La Fin De Nous”, a French-language version, with translation by Christine “Coco” Decroix. All three versions are featured on the 2012 reissue album Bad 25. The original English-language version was re-released as a single in 2012, as part of the Bad 25 release.

La Bamba (song)

“La Bamba” (pronounced: [la ˈβamba]) is a Mexican folk song, originally from the state of Veracruz, best known from a 1958 adaptation by Ritchie Valens, a top 40 hit in the U.S. charts and one of early rock and roll’s best-known songs. Valens’ version of “La Bamba” is ranked number 354 on Rolling Stone magazine′s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It is the only song on the list sung in a language other than English.

“La Bamba” has been covered by numerous artists, most notably by Los Lobos, whose version was the title track of the 1987 film La Bamba and reached No. 1 in the U.S. and UK singles charts in the same year. The Los Lobos version remained No. 1 for three weeks in the summer of 1987. The music video for Los Lobos’ version, directed by Sherman Halsey, won the 1988 MTV Video Music Award for Best Video from a Film.

Who’s That Girl (Madonna song)

“Who’s That Girl” is a song by American singer Madonna from the soundtrack album to the 1987 film Who’s That Girl. It was released on June 30, 1987, by Sire Records as the first album single. The song was later included on the two-disc edition of Madonna’s 2009 greatest hits album Celebration. While shooting for the film, then called Slammer, Madonna had requested Patrick Leonard to develop an uptempo song that captured the nature of her film persona. She later added the lyrics and vocals to the demo tape developed by Leonard, and decided to rename the song as well as the film to “Who’s That Girl”.

Featuring instrumentation from drums, bass, and stringed instruments, “Who’s That Girl” continued Madonna’s fascination with Hispanic culture by incorporating Spanish lyrics and using the effect of double vocals. Although it received mixed reactions from reviewers, the song became Madonna’s sixth single to top the Billboard Hot 100, while peaking atop the charts in countries like the United Kingdom, Canada, Netherlands, Ireland and Belgium. It was also nominated for “Best Song From A Motion Picture” at the 1988 Grammy Awards and “Best Original Song” at the 1988 Golden Globe Awards.

The music video portrayed a different persona of Madonna, rather than her film character for which it was released. Like the song, it incorporated Hispanic culture and portrayed her dressed in Spanish style as a young lady in search of a treasure. Madonna has performed the song on her Who’s That Girl World Tour (1987) and on the Rebel Heart Tour (2015–16). The song has been covered by many artists and has appeared in compilations and tribute albums.

I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For

“I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” is a song by the Irish rock band U2. It is the second track from their 1987 album The Joshua Tree and was released as the album’s second single in May 1987. The song was a hit, becoming the band’s second consecutive number-one single on the US Billboard Hot 100 while peaking at number six on the UK Singles Chart.

The song originated from a demo the band recorded on which drummer Larry Mullen Jr. played a unique rhythm pattern. Like much of The Joshua Tree, the song was inspired by the group’s interest in American music. “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” exhibits influences from gospel music and its lyrics describe spiritual yearning. Lead singer Bono’s vocals are in high register and lead guitarist the Edge plays a chiming arpeggio. Adding to the gospel qualities of the song are choir-like backing vocals provided by the Edge and producers Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois.

“I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” was critically acclaimed and received two nominations at the 30th Grammy Awards in 1988, for Record of the Year and Song of the Year. It has subsequently become one of the group’s most well-known songs and has been performed on many of their concert tours. The track has appeared on several of their compilations and concert films. Many critics and publications have ranked “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” among the greatest tracks in music history[3] including Rolling Stone which ranked the song at #93 of its list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.[4]

Shakedown (Bob Seger song)

“Shakedown” is a song recorded by Bob Seger, from the soundtrack of the film Beverly Hills Cop II. The music was written by Harold Faltermeyer, who also wrote the score for the film, and Keith Forsey, with lyrics by Seger. The song became a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100, Seger’s only such top mark singles-wise, as well as the Album Rock Tracks chart, where it became his second number-one hit, spending four weeks at the top.[1] In Canada, it went to number one as well, topping the RPM 100 national singles chart on August 1 of the same year.[2]

In 1988, “Shakedown” was nominated for both the Academy Award for Best Original Song and Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, but it lost both awards to Dirty Dancing’s “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life”. At the 60th Academy Awards, “Shakedown” was performed by Little Richard.[3]

Alone (Heart song)

“Alone” is a song composed by Billy Steinberg and Tom Kelly. It first appeared via Steinberg and Kelly’s 1983 pet project, I-Ten, on Taking a Cold Look. It was later recorded by Valerie Stevenson and John Stamos in their roles as Lisa Copley and Gino Minelli, on the original soundtrack of the CBS sitcom Dreams in 1984. American rock band Heart made it a number-one US and Canadian hit in 1987. Twenty years later, Celine Dion recorded it for her album Taking Chances.

I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me)

“I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me)” is the first single from Whitney Houston’s second studio album Whitney. It was produced by Narada Michael Walden, and written by George Merrill and Shannon Rubicam of the band Boy Meets Girl, who had previously written the number-one Whitney Houston hit “How Will I Know.” The original arrangement was more of a country tune, but was transformed by Walden to make it a dance song.

The song received mixed reviews from critics, who compared the musical arrangement to her own “How Will I Know” and Cyndi Lauper’s “Girls Just Want to Have Fun.” The song won the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance at the 30th Grammy Awards. The single was a commercial success, topping the charts in 13 countries including Australia, Italy, Germany and the UK. In the US, it became her fourth consecutive number one single and sold over one million copies, making it her biggest hit in that country at the time. It was eventually surpassed by her version of “I Will Always Love You”, five years later in 1992.[1]

Head to Toe

“Head to Toe” is a song recorded by Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam that appeared on their 1987 album Spanish Fly. The song hit number one on three charts: Billboard Hot 100 on June 20, 1987, the Hot Black Singles charts on May 30 of that year,[1] and the dance charts.[2] In Canada, the song topped the RPM 100 national singles chart on July 25 of the same year.[3] The song sports a retro Motown flavor mixed with the Freestyle sound for which they were known.

Always (Atlantic Starr song)

“Always” is ballad song by American recording R&B band Atlantic Starr. The track was the second single from the group’s seventh album All in the Name of Love. The single peaked at number one on both the Hot Black Singles and Billboard Hot 100 charts in June 1987.[1] The song also spent two weeks atop the U.S. adult contemporary chart.[2] In July, it also topped the Canadian RPM 100 national singles chart, where it remained for two weeks.[3][4]

You Keep Me Hangin’ On

“You Keep Me Hangin’ On” is a 1966 song written and composed by Holland–Dozier–Holland. It first became a popular Billboard Hot 100 number one hit for the American Motown group The Supremes in late 1966. The rock band Vanilla Fudge covered the song a year later and had a Top ten hit with their version. British pop singer Kim Wilde covered “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” in 1986, bumping it back to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in June 1987. The single reached number one by two different musical acts in America. In the first 32 years of the Billboard Hot 100 rock era, “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” became one of only six songs to achieve this feat.[1] In 1996, Country music singer Reba McEntire’s version reached number 2 on the US Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart.

Over the years, “You Keep Me Hangin’ On” has been covered by various artists including a charting version by Wilson Pickett, Rod Stewart, Colourbox and the Box Tops.

With or Without You

“With or Without You” is a song by the Irish rock band U2. It is the third track from their fifth studio album, The Joshua Tree (1987), and was released as the album’s lead single on 16 March 1987. The song was the group’s most successful single at the time, becoming their first number-one hit in both the United States and Canada by topping the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks and the RPM national singles chart for one week.

“With or Without You” features sustained guitar parts played by guitarist the Edge with a prototype of the Infinite Guitar, along with vocals by lead singer Bono and a bassline by bassist Adam Clayton. The song originated from a demo recorded in late 1985 that the group continued to work on throughout The Joshua Tree sessions. Ostensibly a troubled love song, the track’s lyrics were inspired by Bono’s conflicting feelings about the lives he led as a musician and domestic man.

Critics praised the song upon its release. It is frequently performed on the band’s tours, and it has appeared on many of their compilation albums and concert films. “With or Without You” is U2’s second most frequently covered song.[2] In 2010, Rolling Stone magazine placed the song at number 132 on their list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.[3]

(I Just) Died in Your Arms

“(I Just) Died in Your Arms” is a song by the English rock band Cutting Crew. The song was released as the lead single from their debut studio album, Broadcast (1986). It was first released on 25 July 1986 in the United Kingdom, and then released to the United States on 1 January 1987. The song was written by frontman Nick Van Eede, produced by Terry Brown, and mixed at Utopia Studios in London by Tim Palmer.

As of 2015, the song remains as the band’s biggest hit, peaking at number-one in the United States, Canada and Finland, and reaching the top five in the UK, South Africa, Sweden and Switzerland.

I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)

“I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)” is a Grammy Award-winning #1 song performed by Aretha Franklin and George Michael as a duet in 1987. It was written by Simon Climie and Dennis Morgan. It also stands as Franklin’s biggest hit at Adult Contemporary radio, spending several weeks at #2.

The official music video for the song was directed by Andy Morahan.[1] It begins with George Michael and two bodyguards entering a dark room. There is a large screen on the wall showing Aretha Franklin preparing for George Michael. In the course of the video the two are shown performing the song both are shown in front of a screen and on it. At the end of the clip Aretha winks at the camera.[2]

Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now

“Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now” is a song co-written by Albert Hammond and Diane Warren,[2] recorded by the American rock band Starship in 1986. It is a duet featuring Starship vocalists Grace Slick and Mickey Thomas. Featured as the theme to the romantic comedy film Mannequin,[3][4] it hit No. 1 in the Billboard Hot 100 on April 4, 1987 and reached No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart for four weeks the following month and became the UK’s 2nd biggest selling single of 1987. The song also reached the top 10 in six European countries. The single became the first number one single by songwriter Diane Warren.[5] At the time, it made Grace Slick (aged 47) the oldest woman to have a number one single in the United States[6] though the record was later broken by Cher’s “Believe” in 1999 (aged 52).

The song also received an Academy Award nomination for “Best Original Song” at the 60th Academy Awards. In addition to appearing on the Mannequin soundtrack, the song was also released on Starship’s album No Protection in July 1987. The music video was released in late 1986 to promote Mannequin.

Lean on Me (song)

“Lean on Me” is a song written and recorded by American singer-songwriter Bill Withers. It was released in April 1972 as the first single from his second album, Still Bill. It was his first and only number one single on both the soul singles and the Billboard Hot 100.[1] Billboard ranked it as the No. 7 song of 1972.[2] It is ranked number 205 on Rolling Stone’s list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.[3] Numerous cover versions have been recorded, and it is one of only nine songs to have reached No. 1 with versions recorded by two different artists.[4]

Jacob’s Ladder (Huey Lewis and the News song)

“Jacob’s Ladder” is a 1986 song written by Bruce Hornsby and his brother John Hornsby and recorded by Huey Lewis and the News. It became a number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1987,[1] the band’s third.

Set in Birmingham, Alabama, the song marries the Biblical image of Jacob’s Ladder to someone who rejects proselytizing evangelists, and is instead struggling to get through life one day at a time:

Step by step, one by one, higher and higher
Step by step, rung by rung, climbing Jacob’s ladder.
The song was given by Hornsby to his friend Lewis, and it appeared on the group’s September 1986 album Fore!. It was the third single released from the album, and topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart for a week in March 1987.[1]

A music video was filmed of the band performing the song in a live concert.

Bruce Hornsby later recorded his own rendition of the song for his 1988 album, Scenes from the Southside. It became part of his concert repertoire as well; a live bluegrass-influenced version (very different from the version on Scenes from the Southside) appears on the 2006 album Intersections (1985–2005), which Hornsby performed with his brother John.

Livin’ on a Prayer

“Livin’ on a Prayer” is Bon Jovi’s second chart-topping single from their 12× Platinum album Slippery When Wet (1986). Written by Jon Bon Jovi, Richie Sambora, and Desmond Child, the single, released in late 1986, was well received at both rock and pop radio and its music video was given heavy rotation at MTV, giving the band their first No. 1 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart and their second consecutive No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 hit.[1]

The song has become the band’s signature song, topping fan-voted lists and re-charting around the world decades after its release. The original 45-RPM single release sold 800,000 copies in the United States,[citation needed] and in 2013 was certified Triple Platinum for over 3 million digital downloads. The official music video has over 248 million hits on YouTube.

Open Your Heart (Madonna song)

“Open Your Heart” is a song by American singer Madonna from her third studio album True Blue (1986). It was released as the album’s fourth single in November 12, 1986 by Sire Records. It has since appeared remixed on the compilation albums The Immaculate Collection (1990) and Celebration (2009). Originally a rock ‘n roll song with the title “Follow Your Heart”, it was written for singer Cyndi Lauper by songwriters Gardner Cole and Peter Rafelson, although it was never played to her. Since Madonna’s management was looking for new songs for True Blue, she accepted it. Madonna altered some of the lyrics and changed the composition to suit the dance-pop genre, giving her a co-writer credit for the song. Lyrically “Open Your Heart” is a love song, talking about innocent feelings of boy-meets-girl romance and Madonna expressing her sexual desire.

The song was well received by critics who commended it for being a simple love song. It was also successful commercially, reaching the top-ten of the charts in Belgium, Canada, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, and the United Kingdom, also reaching the top of Billboard Hot 100 in the United States, thus making it Madonna’s fifth US number-one single. The music video, however, portrayed a different concept of the song. Madonna played an exotic dancer in a peep-show club, who befriends a little boy and subsequently escapes. It was critically acclaimed for portraying a completely opposite perspective of “voyeuristic male gaze and object”, and depicting innocence rather than sexual overtones, although the entry of a child in a strip club was negatively criticized. The video was an homage to actresses Liza Minnelli and Marlene Dietrich.

“Open Your Heart” has been performed by Madonna in three of her world tours – Who’s That Girl World Tour (1987), Blond Ambition World Tour (1990), where Madonna wore her infamous conical bra during the song, and The MDNA Tour (2012). The performances were included in the respective video release of the tours. “Open Your Heart” has been covered a number of times by different artists, and appeared in the Britney Spears film, Crossroads (2002).

At This Moment

“At This Moment” is a song that was first recorded by Billy Vera & The Beaters in 1981 during a string of performances at the Roxy in West Hollywood (January 15–17) and featured on their self-titled live album, Billy and the Beaters, released that year on the American subsidiary of Japan’s Alfa Records.

When it was originally released as a single (Alfa 7005), as the follow-up to the album’s first single, “I Can Take Care of Myself”[1] (which had become the band’s first Billboard Top 40 hit[2]), “At this Moment” stalled on the Billboard Hot 100 chart at #79 at the end of 1981.

Then, when the song was included on several episodes of the NBC sitcom Family Ties during the 1985-86 season as the love song associated with Alex P. Keaton (played by Michael J. Fox) and his girlfriend Ellen Reed (played by Tracy Pollan, whom Fox eventually married in real life), the exposure renewed interest in the song. Reissue label Rhino Records purchased the track from the band’s original record label, Alfa (the American subsidiary of which was by then inactive), and re-released it in its original version as Rhino 74403. The tune then began a revived chart run, eventually hitting #1 on both the Billboard Hot 100[3] and Adult Contemporary charts in January 1987. The song also hit the Billboard R&B Chart and the Billboard Hot Country Chart. As the song was starting to take off it came to the attention of Ron Carpentier President of RCI Music Promotion who was hired on the promotion of the song to radio and soon after the song hit the Billboard Hot Country Chart. It quickly sold over a million copies in the United States, becoming one of the last Gold-certified singles in the 45 RPM format. The song crossed over to the R&B and Country formats, reaching #40 Country.

In an interview with Rachael Ray in 2007, Michael J. Fox good-naturedly said, “Tracy and I couldn’t get on the dance floor anywhere in the world for like ten years without them playing ‘What would you think…’ ” (These are the opening words of “At This Moment.”)[4]

A cover version was recorded by country music singer Neal McCoy on his 1990 debut album, also titled At This Moment. McCoy’s version was released as a single, but did not chart. Another cover version of the song appears on Michael Bublé’s 2009 album, Crazy Love. The song has gone on to become a modern standard with dozens of covers, including Tom Jones, Freda Payne, Danny Boone, Arthur Prysock, Wayne Newton, blues singer Little Milton and soul singer Will Downing. Seth MacFarlane also sang the song’s opening lines in the character of Brian Griffin in the Family Guy episode “Brian the Bachelor”, as well as in the title character in the 2015 film, Ted 2.

Shake You Down

“Shake You Down” is a song by American R&B artist, writer and producer Gregory Abbott. It was released in September 1986 as the lead single from his debut album. It became Abbott’s biggest hit and was certified platinum by the RIAA. Abbott went on the chart with several other songs as well.[1] The track is also featured in the 2007 film Are We Done Yet?

Gregory Abbott wrote the song along with over thirty others before striking a record deal with CBS. He recorded a demo tape and chose the best three.

Dominic Sena of Propaganda Films came up with the idea of the scrolling effect on the music video. It is recorded as a single image on a photographic film.[2]

There is also another music video recorded in Rio de Janeiro, especially for the Brazilian TV show Fantástico.

Walk Like an Egyptian

“Walk Like an Egyptian” is a song made famous by American band the Bangles. It was released in 1986 as the third single from the album Different Light. It was a million-selling single and became Billboard’s number-one song of 1987.

Music producer Liam Sternberg wrote the song after seeing people on a ferry walking awkwardly to keep their balance, which reminded him of figures in Ancient Egyptian reliefs.[citation needed]

Scroll To Top