eurohitlist.eu

You Owe Me One

“You Owe Me One” (working title: “Kamelo”[2]) is a song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA in 1982 for their unfinished ninth album. It was released as a B-side for the group’s last single — “Under Attack”[1] and on the 1997 and 2012 remasters of “The Visitors”.[3][4] It was excluded from the 2001 remaster due to the group’s songwriters critical attitude towards “You Owe Me One”.[5] The main vocal is performed by Anni-Frid Lyngstad, but Agnetha Fältskog joins in on the chorus.

The song’s recording sessions started on 3 May 1982.[6] This single was recorded along with two other ABBA songs — “I Am The City” and “Just Like That”. These two songs were kept unreleased until the mid 1990s,[6] when “Just Like That” was edited and released as a promo single for the “Thank You For The Music” box set[7] and “I Am The City” was released as a part of the “More Gold: More Hits” album.[8] It has been noted, that Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus dislike the song due to it being “just a jingle”.[9]

When I Kissed the Teacher

“When I Kissed the Teacher” is a song from ABBA. It is the opening track on their 1976 album Arrival.

The song’s recording session’s began on June 14, 1976, with the name “Rio de Janeiro”. Eventually, the track was renamed “When I Kissed the Teacher”.[2] The song’s light-hearted lyrics tell the story of a student who has a crush on her teacher, one day cannot restrain herself and kisses him.[3] The lyrics are set to spirited music.[4] Benny Andersson considered this one of his favorite ABBA songs.[1][3]

The video clip “goes from a female student longing for her teacher to her taking direct action by kissing him as he leans over her in class.”[5]

The song was also released on the compilation album More Gold: More Hits and the video was included on The Definitive Collection.[6][7]

Lyrically and musically, the song is filled with “schoolgirl imagery”.[8] Agnetha is lead vocal.[9]

When All Is Said and Done

“When All Is Said and Done” is a song recorded in 1981 by Swedish pop group ABBA. It is featured on the group’s final studio album, The Visitors, and was released as a single in the United States on 31 December 1981 on Atlantic 3889. It debuted on the Billboard pop singles chart on 9 January 1982 and peaked at #27. It also achieved particular success in Canada, where it peaked at No.4 on the Adult Contemporary Chart.[1] The lead vocals were sung by Anni-Frid Lyngstad. The flip-side of the single was “Should I Laugh or Cry”.

Waterloo (ABBA song)

“Waterloo” is the first single from Swedish pop group ABBA’s second album, Waterloo, their first for Epic and Atlantic. This was also the first single to be credited as “ABBA”.

The song won ABBA the 1974 Eurovision Song Contest on 6 April and began their path to worldwide fame. The Swedish version single was coupled with “Honey, Honey” (Swedish version), while the English version usually featured “Watch Out” as the B-side.

The single became their first No. 1 hit in several countries, reached the U.S. Top 10, and went on to sell nearly six million copies, making it one of the best-selling singles of all time.

“Waterloo” is the quintessential Eurovision song, according to Dr Harry Witchel, physiologist and music expert at the University of Bristol.[4] At the 50th anniversary celebration of the Eurovision Song Contest in 2005, it was chosen as the best song in the competition’s history.[5]

Under Attack

“Under Attack” is the last widely released single by Swedish pop group ABBA. It was originally featured as a track on the 1982 compilation album The Singles: The First Ten Years, but was released as a single the following year in most countries. However, in the United Kingdom it was released on 3 December 1982. “Under Attack” was ABBA’s 28th single for Polar Music.

Recording for “Under Attack” began between 2 and 4 August 1982 at Polar Music Studios, Stockholm.[1] The group had originally intended to release a new studio album, but the stress of the working environment led them to indefinitely shelve the project and instead release a double-album compilation of their past singles. Since it was decided that there would be two new tracks on the compilation, ABBA set to work recording the songs. The two tracks that made it onto what became The Singles: The First Ten Years were “The Day Before You Came” and “Under Attack”. The former was released as a single in October 1982. “Under Attack” contains fragments from two unreleased ABBA songs: “Just Like That” and “Rubber Ball Man”, also known as “Under My Sun”.

The Winner Takes It All

“The Winner Takes It All” is a song recorded by the Swedish pop group ABBA. Released as the first single from the group’s Super Trouper album on 21 July 1980, it is a ballad in the key of F-sharp major, reflecting the end of a romance. The single’s B-side was the non-album track “Elaine”.

“The Winner Takes It All”, original demo title “The Story of My Life”, was written by both Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson, with Agnetha Fältskog singing the lead vocal.

Ulvaeus denies the song is about his and Fältskog’s divorce, saying the basis of the song “is the experience of a divorce, but it’s fiction. There wasn’t a winner or a loser in our case. A lot of people think it’s straight out of reality, but it’s not”.[1] American critic Chuck Klosterman, who says “The Winner Takes It All” is “[the only] pop song that examines the self-aware guilt one feels when talking to a person who has humanely obliterated your heart” finds Ulvaeus’ denial hard to believe in light of the original title.[2]

Fältskog has also repeatedly stated that though “The Winner Takes It All” is her favorite ABBA song and that it has an excellent set of lyrics, the story is not that of her and Ulvaeus: there were no winners in their divorce, especially as children were involved. Ulvaeus also wrote the lyrics for Fältskog’s 1979 live number ‘I’m Still Alive’.

In a 1999 poll for Channel 5, “The Winner Takes It All” was voted Britain’s favourite ABBA song. This feat was replicated in a 2010 poll for ITV. In a 2006 poll for a Channel Five programme, “The Winner Takes It All” was voted “Britain’s Favourite Break-Up Song.”

The Way Old Friends Do – Super Trouper (album)

Super Trouper is the seventh studio album by the Swedish pop group ABBA, first released in 1980. It features the No.1 singles “The Winner Takes It All” and “Super Trouper”. The album became the biggest-selling album of 1980 in the UK.

Led by the international hit “The Winner Takes It All”, Super Trouper was the group’s sixth chart-topping album in the UK. It was also the best-selling album in Britain for 1980. Super Trouper was first released on CD in 1983 by Atlantic Records, again in the 1980s by Polar International, and in the 1990s by Polydor in the US. The album has been reissued in digitally remastered form four times; first in 1996, then in 2001, again in 2005 as part of the The Complete Studio Recordings box set and as a Deluxe Edition (containing a bonus DVD) in 2011. The previous year’s divorce between Björn and Agnetha was explored in “The Winner Takes It All”, and the members’ lives in Stockholm high society circles coloured the lyrics for “On and On and On”. Other well-known songs on the album include the hit single title track “Super Trouper”, as well as the electro-dance of “Lay All Your Love on Me”.

Probably due to the disco backlash of the time, the album saw ABBA returning to a more straightforward pop sound,[1] as opposed to the preceding (and noticeably more dance-oriented) Voulez-Vous album. The album closed with “The Way Old Friends Do”, which was recorded live a year earlier during their 1979 concert tour. Although not released as a single with this album, the song was later released as a single in 1992 to promote the compilation More ABBA Gold: More ABBA Hits.[2] The song was later covered by The Alexander Brothers, The Kingston Trio, Philomena Begley and Faryl Smith.

The Visitors (song)

“The Visitors” (originally “Den första”, meaning “The First”), is a 1981 song by the Swedish pop group ABBA. It is the title track from the band’s studio album of the same name, and was released as the second single in the United States in April 1982. The lead vocal was performed by Anni-Frid Lyngstad.

The official stated theme is a protest against the mistreatment of political dissidents in the Soviet Union at the time, as ABBA seemed to input political issues into their lyrics in the final days of the group.[1] Ulvaeus has stated that at the time of release he preferred that the song should have a sense of mystery so did not explain the exact meaning.[2]

In 1982, the album The Visitors was banned in the Soviet Union, possibly due to the band allowing a video of “When All Is Said and Done” to be shown in the United States Information Agency television special, Let Poland Be Poland, along with a spoken message from Ulvaeus and Andersson,[3] broadcast via satellite around the world on 31 January 1982. The show, which also featured Frank Sinatra, Paul McCartney, Orson Welles, Henry Fonda, UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and US President Ronald Reagan, was a public protest against the then-recent imposition of martial law in Poland.[4] However, ABBA’s segment was not included in the broadcast, the official reason given being time restraints. However, it is likely that the segment was omitted because Ulvaeus and Andersson exemplified, in addition to Poland, US-supported dictatorships Chile and El Salvador as countries where citizens’ human rights are routinely violated.[

The King Has Lost His Crown

“The King Has Lost His Crown” is a song by Swedish group ABBA, released on their 1979 album Voulez-Vous.

The song is a “vengeful ballad” whose lyrics are an allegory to describe the end of a relationship.[1]

On his book Abba – Uncensored on the Record, John Tobler said the song “appeared to be much more personal than many of the group’s previous songs”.[1] The Sydney Morning Herald said the “The King Has Lost His Crown” is “an interesting song with some neat variations in style”.[2] Internet reviewer George Starostin said it “is simply way too pompous and ambitious to be endured”.[3] ABBA biograph Carl Magnus Palm said “Perhaps there’s … a sense of “undiscovered gem” about [Voulez-Vous], simply because what I feel were the best tracks were never international single A-sides, such as ‘As Good As New’, ‘The King Has Lost His Crown’ and ‘If It Wasn’t For The Nights’.”[4]

The Day Before You Came

“The Day Before You Came” is a song recorded and released by Swedish pop group ABBA, their second longest (after “Eagle”) at almost 6:00 in length. It was originally released in 1982 as both a single, and a track on the compilation album The Singles: The First Ten Years. Although it was the final ABBA recording, it was not the last song to be released as their final single was “Under Attack”, which also featured on the singles compilation album.

That’s Me

“That’s Me”, originally “Coachman’s Farm”, is a song recorded by the Swedish pop group ABBA in 1976. It was released as a single in Japan the following year (with “Money, Money, Money” as the B-side) to promote the band’s Arrival album, and reached number 75 on the official Japanese charts. Elsewhere, “That’s Me” was used as the B-side to ABBA’s hit single, “Dancing Queen”.

A music video, filmed during the making of 1976 TV special ABBA-dabba-doo!, was made for the song to promote it, which combined original footage, as well as clips and outtakes from previous ABBA “promo videos”, and had its debut seventeen years after being actually filmed, as part of the More ABBA Gold video compilation in 1993.

A greatest hits compilation by Agnetha released internationally in 1998 was named after this song (see That’s Me), one of her favorite ABBA songs.

Thank You for the Music

“Thank You for the Music” is a song by the Swedish pop group ABBA. It was originally featured on the group’s fifth studio album ABBA: The Album (1977), and was released as a single on 6 November 1983, to promote the Epic Records compilation album of the same name (similar compilations were released in other countries). The song “Our Last Summer”, which was originally featured on the group’s seventh studio album Super Trouper (1980), was the B-side. The song was simultaneously released in Ireland (as Epic were the licensees for both UK and Ireland), and later released in France (by Disques Vogue), with the same B-side but different artwork, and the Netherlands (by Polydor Records), with “Medley” as the B-side (and again, different artwork).

“Thank You for the Music” was also the B-side to the single “Eagle” in 1978, which itself was only released in limited territories, namely Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, France, Austria, Switzerland and Australia (though in some territories, such as the Netherlands, it was released as a double A-side). It was released as an A-side single in South Africa where it peaked at number 2 in August 1978 and became the eighteenth best-selling single of that year.

The album version was recorded on 21 July 1977 at Glen Studio after a complete alternate version (known as “Thank You for the Music” (Doris Day version)) was recorded on 2 June 1977 at Marcus Music Studio. The Doris Day version was first released on a box set of the same name on October 31, 1994. Agnetha Fältskog performed the lead vocals, with Anni-Frid Lyngstad joining in on the chorus. “Thank You for the Music” was intended to form part of a “mini-musical” called The Girl with the Golden Hair (a phrase which is featured in the song) that songwriters Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson included in ABBA’s 1977 tour. It was the opening track in the four-song musical, which also included “I Wonder (Departure)”, “I’m a Marionette” and “Get on the Carousel”. The first three songs from the musical were featured on ABBA: The Album; the latter remains unreleased. “Thank You for the Music” is more well known in its own right today.

“Gracias por la Música” is the Spanish-language recording of “Thank You for the Music”, with lyrics by Buddy and Mary McCluskey. The B-side was the Spanish-language version of “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (A Man After Midnight)” entitled “¡Dame! ¡Dame! ¡Dame!”. The song was released in 1980 to promote the band’s Spanish-language album/compilation Gracias Por La Música. It was the group’s seventh best-selling Spanish single, and also peaked at number 4 in Argentina.

“Thank You for the Music” also formed part of ABBA: The Movie which featured studio recordings of selected songs from the then newly released album ABBA: The Album. The song is included in the final scenes as the hapless journalist finally gets to broadcast his ABBA radio special, including an interview, on Australian radio. The song is accompanied by footage of a studio recording session, a live stage performance and a mimed studio performance by the four members of the group. The song also plays over the closing titles as the camera pans out from the band performing in a hut on an island in the Stockholm archipelago to views of the archipelago itself.

Summer Night City

“Summer Night City” is a song recorded by the Swedish pop group ABBA, written by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus as a tribute to their hometown of Stockholm. It is the group’s second non-album single, released on 6 September 1978. It was originally intended as the lead single from the group’s upcoming Voulez-Vous album, but was eventually not included. However, it was featured as a bonus track on the 1997 CD re-issue.

Soldiers (ABBA song)

Soldiers is an ABBA song, released on their 1981 album The Visitors. Its working title was “Peasants”

Billboard explains “emphasizing that although there seems to be so little one can do to prevent the machinations of soldiers and those who control them, we must “not look the other way/taking a chance/cos if the bugle starts to play/we too must dance”.[1] The Telegraph describes the premise of the song as “how warmongers convince themselves they are noble men”.[2]

The entire song rests upon a “simple two-note” statement”. The song has a “string-ensemble synth arrangement”. Agnetha uses a “subdued yet stoic vocal”, and “the chorus vocals, while typically multi-tiered, are somewhat ‘murkier’ and less liberated in texture”.[3]

So Long (ABBA song)

“So Long” is a song by Swedish pop group ABBA, released as the first single from their album ABBA. “So Long” was written and composed by Björn Ulvaeus & Benny Andersson, with vocals by Agnetha Fältskog & Anni-Frid Lyngstad.

The song is musically similar to “Waterloo”. The single was backed with “I’ve Been Waiting for You,” another song from the ABBA album.

Slipping Through My Fingers

“Slipping Through My Fingers” is a song written by Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson and recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA from their 1981 album, The Visitors, with lead vocals by Agnetha Fältskog. The song is about a mother’s regret at how quickly her daughter is growing up, and the lack of time they have spent together, as the girl goes to school.

The inspiration for the song was Ulvaeus’ and Fältskog’s daughter, Linda Ulvaeus, who was seven at the time the song was written.

The song was only released as a single in Japan (Discomate, 1981), where it was a red vinyl promo single for The Coca-Cola Company with nothing on the B-side except a printed picture of the group. An album with the same name and a similar looking cover was also released in Japan.

Should I Laugh or Cry

“Should I Laugh or Cry” is a non-album song by Swedish pop group ABBA, released as the B-side to the 1981 singles “One of Us” and “When All Is Said and Done”.

ABBA – Uncensored on the Record says “Should I Laugh or Cry” is “a rather bitter song” about the end of a relationship.[1] ABBA: Let the Music Speak explains it as “reflect[ing] a failing relationship’s preemptive strikes of anger and contemplation”. The narrator is the “emotionally afflicted party”, both “volatile and pitiless” in the verses yet “tender and forgiving” in the choruses. There is a sense that this is the last time the narrator will put up with this situation.[2]

She’s My Kind of Girl

“She’s My Kind of Girl” is a song written and performed by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, who were later famous as members of ABBA.

Written for the Swedish movie Inga II: The Seduction Of Inga, the song was recorded in November/December 1969, most likely at Europa Film Studios. The song was originally released in March 1970 as the first Björn and Benny single. Two years later it was released in Japan, hitting #1 and selling half a million copies.[1]

The song was subsequently put on the B-side of the Swedish issue of ABBA’s Ring Ring (English version) single, and on the “Ring Ring” album in some other countries (in spite of it having been recorded before ABBA was formed and featuring no contribution from ABBA’s other members, Agnetha Fältskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstad). The song is also unusual in that it is the only track in the entire catalogue that appears in fake stereo. To date, there is no known mono-only version.

This song was used in the soft porn film Inga II: The Seduction of Inga in 1971 (directed by Joseph W. Sarno[2]), along with the song “Inga’s Theme”. This film was released in the U.S and Sweden, but became a bigger smash in the U.S.[1]

Rock Me (ABBA song)

“Rock Me” was a song recorded in 1974 by Swedish pop group ABBA, with Björn Ulvaeus singing the lead vocals. It was first released on the album ABBA.

It was used as the B-side to the group’s 1975 single “I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do”. However, after “I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do” hit number 1 in both Australia and New Zealand, “Rock Me” was released as an A-side, reaching number 4 and number 2 respectively. It was also issued as an A-side in Yugoslavia and in 1979 it was included on the band’s Greatest Hits Vol. 2 album – notable as it was the only track not originally recorded between the years 1976 and 1979 on that particular release. ABBA also performed the track on both their world tours, as seen in ABBA: The Movie (1977) and the 1979 ABBA In Concert documentary. The song was originally to be featured in the ABBA musical “Mamma Mia!”, to be sung on a boat, as the three fathers and a deleted character Stanley rocked the boat from side to side.[1]

The song, whose working title had been “Didn’t I?”, was first recorded as “Baby” (with different lyrics to the final version) on 18 October 1974 at Glen Studio. This version “tongue in cheek” with vocals courtesy of Agnetha, was first released on CD on the box set “Thank You for the Music” as part of the “ABBA Undeleted” section.

Ring Ring (song)

“Ring Ring” is a 1973 single by ABBA, which gave the group their big break in several European countries (although the rest of Europe, North America and Australia would be introduced to ABBA the following year). The song was written in Swedish by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, along with their manager Stig Anderson, and the translation into English lyrics was helped by Neil Sedaka and Phil Cody. The Swedish version reached #1 in the Swedish charts.

“Ring Ring” tells of a lover waiting all alone by the telephone for the object of her desire to call.[1]

People Need Love

“People Need Love” is a song recorded in March 1972 by Swedish pop group ABBA, at the time known as ‘Björn & Benny, Agnetha & Anni-Frid’. The song was on the group’s first album, Ring Ring, released in 1973.

As the majority of ABBA songs were, “People Need Love” was written and composed by the two male band members, Benny Andersson & Björn Ulvaeus. It was engineered by Michael Tretow who aimed to create a Phil Spector-like wall of sound on the recording.

Although their debut album did not bring them to global attention, it follows some standards of ABBA’s style. The ballad is about what people can give each other to make their lives easier and create a better world.

One Man, One Woman

“One Man, One Woman” is a song by ABBA, released on their 1977 album ABBA: The Album. It’s that album’s the third track after “Eagle” and “Take a Chance on Me”.[1] Composed by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, it has appeared in several compilation albums over the years such as 1998’s Love Stories and 2012 The Essential Collection.[2]

The song is about a couple (made up of the titular “man” and “woman”) trying to save their marriage.

On and On and On

“On and On and On” is a pop song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA in 1980 for their Super Trouper album. It was released as a single in a limited number of countries.

The track, which had working titles “Esses vad det svänger när man spelar jazz” (roughly translated as “God Almighty How it Swings When You’re Playing Jazz”) and “‘Til the Night is Gone”, was released as a single in a few countries, namely the United States, Canada, Japan, Argentina, and Australia. The B-side in Australia and Japan was “The Piper”, in Argentina and Canada it was “Our Last Summer”, and in the USA it was “Lay All Your Love On Me” — all of which were also taken from the Super Trouper album.

The single peaked at number 9 in Australia, making it the 15th ABBA single to reach the Top 10 in that country. Although the song only managed to reach number 90 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the U.S., its inclusion on a 12-inch single with the songs “Super Trouper” and “Lay All Your Love on Me” merits all three songs as having reached number 1 on the American dance chart in May 1981.

An early mix of the song was used in the accompanying music video, but not released on record in stereo until 2011, and it features an extra verse:

“Standing up is scary if you think you’re gonna fall /
Like a Humpty-Dumpty ‘fraid of falling off your wall /
I say if you ever wanna know what’s going on /
Gotta keep on rocking baby, ’till the night is gone…”

And for the first time since ABBA made music videos, “On and On and On” music video did not feature any live movement of ABBA. Instead, a photo montage was made from their Las Vegas concert during their 1979 United States tour and tried to (somewhat) match the action of the photos with the song.

The song is in the Dorian mode.

Nina, Pretty Ballerina

“Nina, Pretty Ballerina” is a song recorded in 1973 by Swedish pop group ABBA. It was issued on 7″ vinyl record in Austria and France to promote the band’s debut album Ring Ring, and later in the Philippines (probably to promote the LP The Best of ABBA) and Kenya. It reached #8 on the singles chart in Austria.

The song was also the theme song of Sirius talk-show host Lynn Samuels. Lynn Samuels only played “Nina, Ballerina,” as she called it, on Friday, to reward herself for working all week, when she was on Sirius Radio in New York.[1]

Move On (ABBA song)

“Move On” (working titles Yippee Yay, Big John, Joanne, Love for Me Is Love Forever) is a waltz song recorded by the Swedish music group ABBA for their 1977 release, ABBA: The Album. The lead vocals were performed by Björn Ulvaeus in the spoken first verse and by Agnetha Fältskog in the second and third verses[citation needed].

The Spanish version of “Move On”, “Al Andar” (or “El Andar”), was recorded in January 1980 for ABBA’s Spanish language album Gracias Por La Música with Spanish lyrics by Buddy and Mary McClusky.

Money, Money, Money

“Money, Money, Money” is a song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA, written by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus. It was released as a single on 1 November 1976, as the follow-up to “Dancing Queen” (both from the album Arrival). The B-side, “Crazy World”, was recorded in 1974 during the sessions for the album ABBA.

The song (originally titled “Been and Gone and Done It”)[1] is sung from the viewpoint of a woman who, despite hard work, can barely keep her finances in surplus, and therefore desires a well-off man.

ABBA perform parts of “Money, Money, Money” live in the 1977 film ABBA: The Movie. In the popular musical, Mamma Mia!, the song is sung by the character of Donna as she explains how hard she has to work to keep the taverna in order and her dreams of a better life. In the 2008 film, Meryl Streep sings the song.

Me and I

“Me and I” is a song from ABBA’s 1980 album Super Trouper. As with much of ABBA’s 1980s output, the song features use of a synthesizer, and some have classified the song as synthpop. Anni-Frid Lyngstad handles the lead vocals.

Recording began on 8 September 1980 and finished on 25 September 1980.[1] The track acquired the following two working titles: “Jackass” and “Piccolino”. It is the last song on the first side of Super Trouper.

Me and Bobby and Bobby’s Brother

Me and Bobby and Bobby’s Brother is a song by ABBA, released on their 1973 debut album called Ring Ring.

The song is about “a woman’s reminiscence of her childhood friends”.[1]

Abba – Uncensored on the Record said “the strangely-titled Me and Bobby and Bobby’s Brother bears the mark of a relatively inexperienced lyricist”, adding that “Björn swiftly improved on this”. It also said the song was a “another fairly typical early ditty that was not unlike ‘Me and Bobbe Mcgee’ in melody at times”, and that it “was certainly nothing more than album filler”.[2]

Mamma Mia (song)

“Mamma Mia” is a song recorded by the Swedish pop group ABBA, written by Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus and Stig Anderson, with the lead vocals shared by Agnetha Fältskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstad. It is the opening track on the group’s third album, the self-titled ABBA. The song’s name is derived from Italian, where it is an interjection used in situations of surprise, anguish, or excitement, which corresponds to the English interjection “my” but literally means “My mommy”. The interjection “my my” can be found indeed in some lines within the song.

Lovers (Live a Little Longer)

Lovers (Live a Little Longer) is a song by ABBA, released on their 1979 album Voulez-Vous.

The song premiered in the TV show ABBA in Switzerland in February 1979.[1]

The song argues that a recent scientific study has shown that love is a factor in longevity. It then uses this to say “lovers live a little longer baby, you and me we got a chance to live twice”.

The song contains “electric guitars and restless strings”, which blend together to simulate the “dynamite drug” spoken of in the narrative. The song consists of a “vocal baton-changing” between Frida and Agnetha in the lead up to the chorus. The rhythm track of the song is very similar to that of Eagle. The string arrangement is by Rutger Gunnarsson.[1]

Chiquitita

“Chiquitita” (a Spanish term of endearment for a woman meaning “little one”) is a song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA. It was released in January 1979 as the first single from the group’s Voulez-Vous album. Originally, the track “If It Wasn’t for the Nights” was going to be the album’s lead single, but after “Chiquitita” was completed those plans were abandoned, and it would remain an album track.

Love Isn’t Easy (But It Sure Is Hard Enough)

“Love Isn’t Easy (But It Sure Is Hard Enough)” is a country-rock song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA.[1] It was the fourth and last single to be released from their album Ring Ring, but unusually, it wasn’t issued in ABBA’s home-country of Sweden, but elsewhere in Scandinavia.[2] It was coupled with “I Am Just a Girl” as its B-side upon release in 1973. The song was one of the last songs to be recorded for the album Ring Ring. “Love Isn’t Easy (But It Sure Is Hard Enough)” was the first and last Polar single to be issued as ‘Björn & Benny, Agnetha & Frida’.

The song describes the common phenomenon of a quarrel between lovers, and although the song’s title seems to be self-contradictory, it’s unlikely that it pertains to a sexual double entendre as some have believed it to be.[3]

The song was written and composed by Benny Andersson & Björn Ulvaeus. All four members of the ABBA share the lead vocals.

Like an Angel Passing Through My Room

“Like an Angel Passing Through My Room” by ABBA is the closing track from the group’s final studio album, The Visitors. It was written by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus.

Work began on this track on 26 May 1981 in Polar Music Studios.[2] The first demo recording of the melody was made with Björn Ulvaeus singing a lyric with the title “Twinkle, Twinkle”. Then the track was given the title “Another Morning Without You”. In later recording sessions it was re-titled “An Angel Walked Through My Room”, “An Angel’s Passing Through My Room”. At one point the song was turned into a disco track but this idea was eventually abandoned as the group felt it sounded too similar to “Lay All Your Love on Me”.[3] Initially the track featured vocal parts from both Agnetha Fältskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstad but the final version of the song featured Anni-Frid as soloist. It is the only ABBA song to feature just one vocalist.[4]

Lay All Your Love on Me

“Lay All Your Love on Me”, is a song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA in 1980 for their Super Trouper album. It was released only as a 12-inch single in 1981 in limited territories, rather than as a standard 7-inch record. At the time, it was the highest selling 12-inch record in UK chart history, where it peaked at number 7. “Lay All Your Love on Me” appears on the group’s ABBA Gold: Greatest Hits collection.

Slant Magazine placed it at number 60 on their list of the greatest dance songs of all time.[1]

Knowing Me, Knowing You

“Knowing Me, Knowing You” is a hit single recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA. The song was written by Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus and Stig Anderson, with Anni-Frid Lyngstad singing the lead vocals. During recording sessions, it had the working titles of “Ring It In” and “Number 1, Number 1”. The song is featured on the group’s album Arrival, and also on the Gold: Greatest Hits compilation.

King Kong Song

“King Kong Song” (originally “Mr. Sex”), written and composed by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, is the name of a 1974 recording by Swedish pop group ABBA, included on their album Waterloo. In 1977, the track was released as a single to coincide with the re-release of the movie King Kong, which charted at #94 in Australia,[1] where it had previously been the B-side to “I’ve Been Waiting for You”. It received a substantial amount of unsolicited airplay in Sweden, even though by then three years and two albums had come and gone since its original 1974 conception. The song bears a resemblance to the style of the Beach Boys.

In 1974, the song competed in the Swedish radio chart show Tio i topp, where it stayed in the charts for four shows and peaked at #4.[2] Also in Sweden, “King Kong Song” was the B-side to “Honey, Honey”.

I’ve Been Waiting for You (ABBA song)

“I’ve Been Waiting for You” was a song recorded in 1974 by Swedish pop group ABBA, released first as the B-side to the single “So Long”. It was included on their album ABBA (released April 1975).

It was, however, released as an A-side in Australia in 1974, where it reached number 49,[1] and in New Zealand in 1977, where it reached number 8.[2]

Intermezzo No. 1

“Intermezzo No. 1” was an instrumental track from Swedish pop group ABBA’s self-titled third album, released in April 1975. It was the first of only two songs by the group not to contain lyrics; the other was the title track of their 1976 release, Arrival. It is the only purely instrumental ABBA song however, as Arrival includes “a static layer of rich harmony vocals”.[1] On the cover, the song was credited as “Intermezzo No.1 featuring Benny Anderson”.[2]

I’m a Marionette

“I’m a Marionette” is a song recorded by the Swedish pop group ABBA from their fifth album, ABBA: The Album. Written by Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson,[1] this song was part of a mini-musical called The Girl with the Golden Hair that ABBA performed at several of their live concerts. The other songs in the “mini-musical” were “Thank You for the Music”, “I Wonder (Departure)” and “Get on the Carousel”. With the exception of the last track, studio versions of these appeared on the 1977 ABBA album. I’m a Marionette was the B-Side of “Take a Chance on Me”, when it was released as a single.

In 2013, Swedish heavy metal band Ghost released a cover of the song as the B-side of their single “Secular Haze”, and later included it on the deluxe and Japanese editions of their album Infestissumam. It was also featured on their 2013 covers EP If You Have Ghost.

If It Wasn’t for the Nights

“If It Wasn’t for the Nights” (working title: “Pandemonium”) is a song recorded by the Swedish pop group ABBA for their sixth studio album, Voulez-Vous. The song had been remixed, re-recorded, and edited by a total of four times; having been remixed twice for the group’s appearance on The Mike Yarwood Show and the ABBA in Japan special, making it 3:42 and 3:50 from the original length, and 5:11, respectively.

It was re-recorded at Miami, Florida by Benny and Björn as an instrumental and was later edited for the Japanese single release of “Slipping Through My Fingers”. Originally, the song would be the lead single for the album, Voulez-Vous, but finally, after “Chiquitita” was finished, the plans were shelved. “If It Wasn’t for the Nights” became only an album track, remastered four times; first in 1997, then in 2001, and in 2005 as part of the Complete Studio Recordings box set, and yet again in 2010 for the Voulez-Vous Deluxe Edition.

I Saw It in the Mirror

“I Saw It in the Mirror” is a song by ABBA, released in their 1973 album Ring Ring.

The song was recorded in early 1970.[1]
The deluxe reissue of the Ring Ring album is set to include a rare original version of I Saw It in the Mirror – by Billy G-son.[2][3]

Björn and Benny are lead vocalists on this song.[4] The song includes an electric piano and a synth bass. The song has a chord-per-bar pattern that is sometimes broken due to filigree.[5]

I Let The Music Speak

I Let The Music Speak is a song by ABBA, featured as the first track to Side Two of their 1981 album The Visitors. It is the fifth longest ABBA track, after Eagle, The Day Before You Came, The Visitors, and Chiquitita.[1]

Billboard said the song “is the singer’s personal acknowledgement of the wondrous transcendental power and sweep of music”.[2] Abba – Uncensored on the Record says the song “suggest[s] that after all the good times and bad times, music will never let you down”.[3]

I Have a Dream (song)

“I Have a Dream” is a song by Swedish pop group ABBA. It was featured on the group’s sixth studio album Voulez-Vous and released as a single in December 1979. The single became a big hit, topping the charts in many countries and peaking at No.2 in the UK over the Christmas week of 1979. Twenty years later, Irish pop group Westlife released a version of the song which reached No.1 in the UK over the Christmas week of 1999.

I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do

“I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do” was a hit single for Swedish pop group ABBA, and was their next major worldwide hit after “Waterloo”. It was the second single to be released from their ABBA album, and one of the last songs to be recorded for the album. The song was written by Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus and their manager Stig Anderson, and was released in April 1975 with “Rock Me” as the B-side.

The song was recorded on 21 February 1975 at Glen Studio, and was inspired by the European “schlager” music of the 1950s, and also by the saxophone sound of American 1950s orchestra leader Billy Vaughn.

Honey, Honey

“Honey, Honey” is a song by the Swedish pop group ABBA. It was released as the second single from their second studio album, Waterloo, after the success of the title track winning the 1974 Eurovision Song Contest.

“Honey, Honey” was written by Björn Ulvaeus, Benny Andersson and Stig Anderson, with shared vocals by Agnetha Fältskog, Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Ulvaeus. As well as the English version, ABBA also recorded “Honey, Honey” in Swedish on January 30, 1974 at Metronome Studio, Stockholm.

This was the last official recording by the group in their own language, and was released as the B-side of the Swedish “Waterloo” single. In its English format, “Honey, Honey” was released with “King Kong Song” as the B-side.

Head over Heels (ABBA song)

“Head over Heels” is a 1981 song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA, released as a single the following year. It was extracted from their final studio album, The Visitors, and coupled with the title track of that album as the B-side.

“Head over Heels”, whose working title was “Tango”, was written and composed by both Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus. Agnetha Fältskog sang the lead vocals, singing about her “very good friend,” played in the music video by Anni-Frid Lyngstad, an overactive high-society woman who rushes through the shops, with her hapless and exhausted husband (played by Ulvaeus) following behind. The song’s video was the group’s final clip directed by long-time collaborator Lasse Hallström.

Jim Colyer describes the song’s premise as about “a motivated lady in an age of women’s liberation” who finds herself in situations which “call for assertiveness” such as: “pushing through unknown jungles, pushing through the darkness and pushing through the crowd”.[1]

As with the previous single “One of Us”, Epic Records in the UK used a different picture sleeve from the standard one used in most countries.

The single[2] was not released in the United States, who flipped the B-side to release “The Visitors” as a single instead, with “Head over Heels” as the B-side.[3]

The sheet music has been released,[4] and the song has been choreographed for dance numbers.[5][6]

He Is Your Brother

“He Is Your Brother” is a song recorded in 1972 by Swedish pop group ABBA, at the time known as “Björn & Benny, Agnetha & Anni-Frid”.

The song continued on the lyrical theme from “People Need Love” about reaching out to your fellow man. It was issued as a single in Scandinavia, and was taken from the group’s debut album Ring Ring, which was released in 1973 in Scandinavia and a few European countries, excluding the United Kingdom. The catalogue number for Scandinavian releases on the Polar label is: POS 1168.[1] The catalogue number [in New Zealand?] is: FAY 1054, the previous issue on this label being “People Need Love”. The catalogue number in the United States is P 50037 on Playboy Records label.

Hasta Mañana

“Hasta Mañana” (Spanish for “Until tomorrow”), which originally was titled “Who’s Gonna Love You?”, is the fourth track on Swedish pop group ABBA’s second studio album, Waterloo.

Initially fearing that “Waterloo” might be too risky to enter for the 1974 Eurovision Song Contest, the group considered performing the ballad “Hasta Mañana” instead, as they thought that it was more in style with previous Eurovision winners. Eventually, they decided on “Waterloo”, primarily because it featured Agnetha Fältskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstad sharing lead vocals, whereas “Hasta Mañana” had Fältskog as the sole lead vocalist. ABBA believed that this would give the wrong impression of them to the world.

While the song was being recorded, they decided to give up on it at one point because none of them could sing it properly. Agnetha alone was in the studio and decided to play around with it. She felt if she could sing it in a Connie Francis style it would work — and it did.[1]

In Australia, “Hasta Mañana” was later used as a B-side on the “So Long” single (which never charted). After being featured in the immensely popular The Best of ABBA TV Special, broadcast in March 1976, the song became a Top 20 hit in Australia and Top 10 hit in New Zealand.

It reached number 2 on the charts in South Africa, where it remains immensely popular to this day.[citation needed]

Happy New Year (song)

“Happy New Year” is a song by Swedish group ABBA from their 1980 album Super Trouper. The lead vocals are by Agnetha Fältskog. The song’s working title was all the more festive and humorous; “Daddy Don’t Get Drunk on Christmas Day”.[2] Although recorded in 1980, the English-language song wasn’t released as a single until 1999[3] and charted at no. 34 in Sweden,[4] no. 15 in the Netherlands,[5] no. 75 in Germany,[6] to promote the CD re-release of many of ABBA’s singles.

“Felicidad”[7] was the Spanish-language version of the song. The single charted in the top 5 in Argentina. The song was also included on the South American versions of the Super Trouper album. Released in 1980 in Argentina, the single’s B-side was the album’s title track, “Super Trouper”.

“Felicidad” was first released on CD as part of the 1994 Polydor US compilation Más ABBA Oro, and in 1999 on the expanded re-release of ABBA Oro: Grandes Éxitos.

In 2008, it was released again in several countries, and charted no. 25 in Denmark,[8] no. 11 in Norway,[9] and no. 4 in Sweden.[4] It re-entered the Sweden and Norway charts in 2009 at no. 5 in both charts and reached the Dutch Top 10 in 2011.[4][9]

In December 2011 a silver glitter vinyl single limited to 500 pieces was released including the songs Happy New Year and The Way Old Friends Do. The edition was available from the official ABBA site and the ABBF fan site only. It was sold out within the day of announcing the release.[10]

Upon the release of ABBA: The 40th Anniversary Singles Box Set on 5 May 2014, it was discovered that an alternate mix of “Andante, Andante” was used on the b-side of the single in the boxset instead of the original album version.

Fernando (song)

“Fernando” is a song by the Swedish pop group ABBA. It was the group’s first non-album single and was released in March 1976 through Polar Music. Solo parts were sung by Anni-Frid Lyngstad. The track was featured on the 1976 compilation album Greatest Hits in some countries, although in Australia and New Zealand, “Fernando” was included on the 1996 CD reissue of the group’s fourth studio album Arrival. “Fernando” is also featured on the multi-million selling Gold: Greatest Hits compilation. The song was to become ABBA’s best-selling single of all time, with 6,000,000 copies sold in 1976 alone.[1] It is one of less than forty all-time singles to have sold 10 million (or more) physical copies worldwide, making it one of the best selling singles of all time.

Eagle (song)

“Eagle” is a song that was recorded in 1977 by the Swedish pop group ABBA. It was the first track on the group’s fifth album, ABBA: The Album and the longest selection they ever recorded (at 5:51, 1 second longer than “The Day Before You Came” at 5:50). The fourth and last official single from ABBA: The Album, it was released only in a limited number of territories, with “Thank You for the Music” as the B-side. “Eagle” was not released as a single in the United Kingdom. It was released in the US, but then withdrawn.[1]

“Eagle” was written and composed by Benny Andersson & Björn Ulvaeus, a kind of a tribute to a band that the main composers of the group admired at the time; The Eagles.[2] The recording, which commenced on 1 June 1977, had the working titles of “High, High” and “The Eagle.” Lyricist Ulvaeus was inspired by Richard Bach’s novel Jonathan Livingston Seagull when he wrote the lyrics for this song.[citation needed] In later years, music critics have hailed “Eagle” as one of ABBA’s more outstanding tracks in terms of lyrics.

Dum Dum Diddle

“Dum Dum Diddle” is a song by ABBA, released on their 1976 album Arrival. In 1977 it was released as a single in Argentina on the RCA label.

When asked “how did [ABBA] manage to make such a ridiculous and quite banal song [as Dum Dum Diddle] come alive”, Björn Again founder Rod Leissle said “I think ABBA had a special quality about them. They could put ridiculous lyrics into a song, and because they were fundamentally great songwriters they could make it work. A line like ‘Dum Dum Diddle, to be your fiddle’ doesn’t really make a great deal of sense, but it still works because it’s something you can sing along to and enjoy”.[1]

Dum Dum Diddle is a folk-inspired pop song. The song has Lasse Wellander’s acoustic guitar in the verses. Benny plays piano during the breaks between the girl’s “woh-woh” vocals. The song has a fiddle-style refrain (simulated by a synthesiser), which serves as the its hook. It contains a “stream of strong melodies and instrumentation”.[2]

The song is about a woman who quietly longs for the affections of a sad, lonely man who derives his only pleasure from constantly playing and practicing on his violin. The Guardian described it as “a song about a woman who feels sexually threatened by her partner’s violin”.[3]

Does Your Mother Know

“Does Your Mother Know” (working title: “I Can Do It”) is a song recorded in 1979 by Swedish pop group ABBA and was the second single to be released from their album Voulez-Vous. The B-side was “Kisses of Fire”, also taken from the album.

“Does Your Mother Know” was recorded in February 1979 and released as a single in April of that year. Written by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, the song is something of a pastiche to 1950s/early 1960s-style rock and roll and touches on the subject of a man responding to the flirting of a much younger girl.

“Does Your Mother Know” deviated from the typical ‘ABBA at their most famous’ formula, in that the lead vocals were sung not by the female vocalists (Agnetha Fältskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstad) as was usually the case, but by Björn Ulvaeus. This was one of the few ABBA singles to feature Ulvaeus as the sole lead vocal, along with ‘Rock Me’.

The track originally featured a 30-second instrumental introduction which was ultimately cut from the recording. A session in late March 1979 saw the addition of Benny’s characteristic synthesizer introduction, as well as work on the backing track that turned a boogie rock stomper into a disco track.

Disillusion (ABBA song)

“Disillusion” is a ballad[1] by the pop group ABBA, on their first album Ring Ring (1973). It is notable as the only song ABBA recorded to have a song-writing credit from Agnetha Faltskog.[2][3] She, unlike Anni-Frid Lyngstad, was a songwriter as well as a singer, and had dabbled in that in her pre-ABBA career.[4] She wrote the music, with lyrics added by fellow ABBA member Björn Ulvaeus.[5]

Although she wrote several Swedish top 40 hits during her solo career, Faltskog did not feel her compositions were suitable for ABBA’s albums. However, although this is her only songwriting credit to appear on an ABBA album, she also co-wrote a song that ABBA performed in concert, “I’m Still Alive”; recordings of this often appears in bootlegs. The song itself is a folk-pop based ballad somewhat similar to her pre-ABBA solo work.

Dancing Queen

“Dancing Queen” is a song by the Swedish group ABBA, and the lead single from their fourth studio album, Arrival. It was written by Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus and Stig Anderson. Andersson and Ulvaeus also produced the song. “Dancing Queen” was released as a single in Sweden on 16 August 1976, followed by a UK release and the rest of Europe a few days later.[1] It was a worldwide hit.[1] It became ABBA’s only number one hit in the United States, and topped the charts in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Ireland, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom, West Germany and Zimbabwe. “Dancing Queen” reached the Top 5 in many other countries.[2][3]

Musically, “Dancing Queen” is a Europop version of American disco music.[3] As disco music dominated the US charts, the group decided to follow the trend, replicating the “Wall of Sound.”[3] The song alternates between “languid yet seductive verses” and a “dramatic chorus that ascends to heart-tugging high notes.”[4] It features keyboard lines by Andersson, which accentuate the melody’s sophistication and classical complexity, while Ulvaeus and Andersson interlace many instrumental hooks in and out of the mix.[4] Anni-Frid Lyngstad and Agnetha Fältskog’s layered vocals have been noted for their dynamism,[3] “[negotiating] the melody’s many turns flawlessly.”[4] Lyrically, the song concerns a visit to the discotheque, but approaches the subject from the joy of dancing itself, thus having a greater emotional content than many disco songs.[

Chiquitita

“Chiquitita” (a Spanish term of endearment for a woman meaning “little one”) is a song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA. It was released in January 1979 as the first single from the group’s Voulez-Vous album. Originally, the track “If It Wasn’t for the Nights” was going to be the album’s lead single, but after “Chiquitita” was completed those plans were abandoned, and it would remain an album track.

Many preliminary versions of “Chiquitita” exist. It had working titles of “Kålsupare”, “3 Wise Guys”, “Chiquitita Angelina” and “In The Arms of Rosalita”.[1] A revised version, which had a sound that was influenced by the Peruvian song “El Condor Pasa (If I Could)” performed by Simon and Garfunkel, was recorded in December 1978 and released as a single in January 1979.[citation needed]

With the success of the English version, ABBA also recorded “Chiquitita” in Spanish by phonetics, and it was one of the featured tracks on the Spanish-language release Gracias Por La Música.

Bang-A-Boomerang

“Bang-A-Boomerang” is a song by ABBA, first released by Svenne & Lotta (both Swedish and English-language versions). The track was first recorded as a demo with English lyrics (but without any recorded vocals) in September 1974 by the ABBA musicians for their forthcoming eponymous album ABBA. The song was written by Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus and Stig Anderson and at one point had the working title “Stop and Listen to Your Heart”. The lyrics compare the “message of love” with the returning boomerangs which the Australian Aborigines developed.

In late 1974 Andersson, Ulvaeus and Anderson were invited by Sveriges Television as composers to submit a song to the 1975 melodifestivalen. Since ABBA themselves did not want to compete in the contest again, just one year after having won, they instead gave the opportunity and the song to Polar Music labelmates Svenne & Lotta. “Bang-A-Boomerang” was given new Swedish lyrics by Stig Anderson and retitled “Bang en Boomerang” and the duo subsequently made a vocal recording of the track in November 1974 – produced by Björn & Benny – with a different arrangement, most noticeably slightly shorter (2:50) than the original demo, to fit the Eurovision three-minute rule. The song finished 3rd in the Swedish preselections in February 1975, became one of Svenne & Lotta’s biggest hits and spent 7 weeks on the Svensktoppen radio chart during the period 9 March-11 May 1975, with a 2nd place as best result.[1] Svenne & Lotta also recorded the song with the original English lyrics, both versions were included on their 1975 album Svenne & Lotta 2/Bang-A-Boomerang (Polar POLS 259). The English version was also released as a single in Denmark and became a big seller there, from a Scandinavian perspective the track is therefore still primarily seen as a hit single and Melodifestivalen classic by Svenne & Lotta. Under the name of “Sven & Charlotte”, their original English version was also released in most European countries, and in Oceania, charting in several.[2]

ABBA then re-recorded their English-language version of the song in the Spring of 1975, using the Svenne & Lotta backing track – reputedly to the surprise of the duo, included it on their ABBA album and later also released it as a single in France on 21 April 1975, with “SOS” as B-side, where it was a minor hit. Although the track was included on the band’s first Greatest Hits album, released on 17 November 1975, the ABBA version was in fact never issued as a single in Scandinavia.

As Good as New

“As Good as New” is a song recorded in 1979 by Swedish group ABBA, and was used as the opening track on their Voulez-Vous album. The song was released as a single in Mexico (with “I Have a Dream” as the B-side), where it became ABBA’s ninth (and final) number-one hit.[1] “As Good as New” was also released in Argentina[2] and in Bolivia.[3]

Songs Writer & Producers   –  Benny Andersson & Björn Ulvaeus

Arrival (composition)

“Arrival” is a 1976 composition by Swedish pop group ABBA featured on their album of the same name. It is an instrumental piece, mainly the brainchild of member Benny Andersson and had the working titles of “Fiol”, “Ode to Dalecarlia” and “Arrival in Dalecarlia”.

“Arrival” was the second and last composition from the group not to contain lyrics, following “Intermezzo No.1” the previous year. As with “Intermezzo No.1”, the choral tune, heavily influenced by traditional Swedish folk music, was written by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus. It was recorded on 30 August 1976 at Stockholm’s Metronome Studio. The title of the album, Arrival, gave the instrumental its name, rather than vice versa. It was also one of the last tracks to be recorded for the album before its release on 11 October 1976.

In 1983, a different version of the song with lyrics, called “Belle”, was sung by Daniel Balavoine and Anni-Frid Lyngstad (“Frida”) as part of the French musical ABBAcadabra. Also in 1983, it was re-recorded with different lyrics, and released as “Time” by B. A. Robertson and Lyngstad.

Another Town, Another Train

“Another Town, Another Train” was a song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA at KMH Studios.

The song was released as a 7″ vinyl single in Japan in 1973 to promote the group’s debut album Ring Ring. “Another Town, Another Train” was also released as a single on Playboy Records in the USA as a follow-up to the group’s first single “People Need Love”.

Written and performed in the style of Simon and Garfunkel and The Bachelors, the melodic ballad tells of the song’s narrator leaving his love as “day is dawning”.[1] It was recorded in German under the title “Wer im Wartesaal der Liebe steht” (with lyrics by Fred Jay), as the B-side to the German version of “Ring Ring”. With lyrics in Swedish, “En annan stad, en annan vän”, it was covered by dance band Schytts in 1974, and by fellow Eurovision participant Kikki Danielsson in 1991 on her album “Vägen hem till dej”.[2]

Angeleyes

“Angeleyes” (also known as “Angel Eyes”)[1] is a pop song written and recorded in 1979 by Swedish group ABBA. Released as a double A-side with “Voulez-Vous”, coming from the album of the same name, the lyrics and music were composed by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus. It is known as one of ABBA’s most popular tracks in the United Kingdom, becoming a Top 40 hit that peaked at the country’s number three spot.[2][3]

Lyrically, the track is a sentimental ballad in which the protagonist beseeches women to avoid the deceptively innocent looking gaze of a handsome yet deceitful man, warning them to beware the “game he likes to play”.[4] The vocals came from Ulvaeus with Agnetha Fältskog and Anni-Frid Lyngstad. The main working title for the song was “Katakusom”.[citation needed] Over the years, it has appeared in various musical collections such as The Definitive Collection (2001) and The Albums (2008).[5][6]

Andante, Andante

“Andante, Andante” was a song recorded by Swedish pop group ABBA, released in only two countries: El Salvador and Argentina. It was written by Benny and Björn on April 9, 1980, at Polar Music studios. At the beginning, this song was called “Hold Me Close”.

The lyrics were translated into Spanish by Buddy and Mary McCluskey and recorded in October 1980 at Polar Music studios, see abbaomnibus.net. This song was released for the first time in the album Super Trouper – Latin America version as track number 4 and it was reused in the album ABBA Oro as track number 12.

Abba – Uncensored on the Record explains “Andante Andante is a love song, and the repeated musical term of the title means gently, slowly or at a walking pace in Italian.”[1]

This song was never released as a single (only in the B side of “Happy New Year” in Portugal).

Because the song was released as a single in only two countries, it never achieved success and never appeared in the global charts.

Though the theme seems at first to be a treatise in love making: “Make your fingers soft and light/ Let your body be the velvet of the night”, the sensual nature of the song is somewhat mitigated in the refrain as it becomes an invocation of the muse: “I am your music and I am your song/Play me time and time again and make me strong”. Augmentation is used in the refrain with the melody sung at half the tempo of the backing tracks, both singing the same lyrics.

The Abba tribute choir “Andante Andante” takes its name from this song.[2]

The Herald describes Andante, Andante as having an “Italian” flavour.[3]

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