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You Shook Me All Night Long

“You Shook Me All Night Long” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, from the album Back in Black. The song also reappeared on their later album Who Made Who. It is AC/DC’s first single to feature Brian Johnson as the lead singer and reached number 35 on the USA’s Hot 100 pop singles chart in 1980. The single was re-released internationally in 1986, following the release of the album Who Made Who. The re-released single in 1986 contains the B-side(s): B1. “She’s Got Balls” (Live, Bondi Lifesaver ’77); B2. “You Shook Me All Night Long” (Live ’83 – 12-inch maxi-single only).

“You Shook Me All Night Long” placed at number 10 on VH1’s list of “The 100 Greatest Songs of the 80s”. It was also number 1 on VH1’s “Top Ten AC/DC Songs”. Guitar World placed “You Shook Me All Night Long” at number 80 on their “100 Greatest Guitar Solos” list.

Who Made Who (song)

“Who Made Who” is a song and a single by the Australian hard rock band AC/DC, taken from their 1986 album, Who Made Who. The 12-inch single format of the single features an extended mix of the song and can be found in the Deluxe Edition of AC/DC’s Backtracks Boxset, on Disc 1, Studio Rarities. It was one of only three new tracks on Who Made Who, because the album is not only a soundtrack to Stephen King’s Maximum Overdrive, but a compilation album featuring tracks from previous albums. The other two new tracks were instrumentals.

In the video to this song, directed by David Mallet,[1] filmed in the lobby of and onstage at the Brixton Academy music venue in London, fans and radio contest winners were dressed like Angus Young, and carried red cardboard guitars similar to Angus’s Gibson SG. The video’s plot features scientists replicating Angus by means of science fiction technology; the lookalikes are shown en masse, marching in time to the song and raising their heads to chant the title phrase along with the chorus. A photo of Angus standing amid a group of his counterparts can be found inside the 2003 Digipak release of Who Made Who. A couple of AC/DC shows had some look alike Anguses on the stage with them, such as at the Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, New York, where six were present.

In addition to the song itself, “Who Made Who” has also been played live, mostly throughout the subsequent world tour and the Blow Up Your Video World Tour. It was also played live with replacement drummer Chris Slade throughout The Razors Edge World Tour, and with drummer Phil Rudd (who returned to the band in 1994 after being fired from the group 11 years prior) for only one gig at the opening night of the Ballbreaker World Tour in Greensboro, North Carolina, after which the song was dropped and has not been played live since. A live version was released on the 1992 album AC/DC Live.

Whole Lotta Rosie

“Whole Lotta Rosie” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the eighth and final track on the band’s fourth Australian album, Let There Be Rock, released in Australia in March 1977, and was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young, and Bon Scott. It is also the eighth and final track on the international version of the album, released in June the same year.

It was also released as a single in 1978, with a live version of the Let There Be Rock album track “Dog Eat Dog” as the B-side, which had been recorded in concert in Glasgow on 30 April 1978.

Wiki Black Ice (album)

Black Ice is an album by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It was the band’s fourteenth internationally released studio album and the fifteenth in Australia. Released internationally on 17 October 2008, it was produced by Brendan O’Brien. It marked the band’s first original recordings since 2000’s Stiff Upper Lip, with the eight-year gap being the longest between AC/DC’s successive studio albums. Black Ice has the longest running time of any AC/DC studio album.

The album’s development was delayed because bass guitarist Cliff Williams sustained an injury and the band changed labels from Elektra Records to Sony Music Entertainment. The first composing sessions between guitarists/brothers Angus and Malcolm Young were in London in 2003. Recording happened during March and April 2008 at The Warehouse Studio in Vancouver, Canada. O’Brien tried to recapture the rock sound of the band’s early work, as opposed to the blues orientation of Ballbreaker and Stiff Upper Lip, with suggestions such as adding “soul crooning” to Brian Johnson’s singing. The songs were mostly recorded live in the studio; engineer Mike Fraser used only sparse overdubs and effects to keep the tracks as close to the originals as possible.

Black Ice was released exclusively in physical formats, as the group did not sell its music digitally at the time. Walmart got exclusive rights to distribute the album in North America. Its release was promoted with an extensive marketing campaign, which included displays of AC/DC memorabilia. The four singles issued from the album were, “Rock ‘N’ Roll Train”, “Big Jack”, “Anything Goes”, and “Money Made”. Black Ice peaked at number one in 29 countries, including Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. It was the second best-selling record of 2008, behind Coldplay’s Viva La Vida or Death and All His Friends and had shipped 6 million copies worldwide by December. Critical reviews were generally positive, praising the music and its resemblance to the classic AC/DC sound, although some critics found the work too long and inconsistent. The track “War Machine” won the Best Hard Rock Performance category at the Grammys. The album itself was nominated for many awards, including the Grammy, Brit, Juno and ARIA Music Awards; and was supported by a world tour between 2008 and 2010.

Touch Too Much

“Touch Too Much” is the fourth track on AC/DC’s 1979 album Highway to Hell, their last with lead vocalist Bon Scott, who died the following year. The song was performed by Scott and AC/DC on BBC music show “Top of the Pops” 12 days before his death. This episode, dated 7 February 1980, was repeated by BBC Four on 19 February 2015, the 35th anniversary of Scott’s death.

The cover of the single in many territories was released with the band photograph flipped horizontally, incorrectly showing the Youngs and bassist Cliff Williams as playing left-handed.

The music video was live rehearsal performance from If You Want Blood Tour 1978-1979, along with “Walk All Over You” on the Family Jewels DVD compilation.

Prior to joining AC/DC on the Rock or Bust World Tour, Axl Rose said this was his favourite AC/DC song. The song was first performed live on May 22, 2016 in Prague.[1]

A song with the same title can be found on Volts, part of their Bonfire box set, released in 1997.

The song is featured in the video games Grand Theft Auto: The Lost and Damned and Grand Theft Auto: The Ballad of Gay Tony.

T.N.T. ( song)

“T.N.T.” is a single released in 1976 by the hard rock band AC/DC, taken from their Australian album T.N.T. and the international version of High Voltage. The song was written by Bon Scott, Angus Young and Malcolm Young. It peaked at No.11 on the Australian Kent Music Report Singles Chart.[1]

A slightly modified line from the song, “Lock up your daughters”, was used as the title of AC/DC’s first headlining tour of Great Britain in 1976 after the band’s move from Melbourne, Australia, to London, earlier that year. “T.N.T.” later appeared on Live and the Live: 2 CD Collector’s Edition, with Brian Johnson providing vocals. The band the song TNT was made of was made in 1973

Thunderstruck (song)

“Thunderstruck” is the lead single on the 1990 album The Razors Edge by Australian hard rock band AC/DC.

The song was released as a single in Germany, Australia, and Japan, and peaked at No. 5 on U.S. the Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks. In 2010, “Thunderstruck” topped Triple M’s Ultimate 500 Rock Countdown in Melbourne, Australia. The top five were all AC/DC songs.[2]

With the exception of new material from an album they are touring behind, this is one of the only two songs released after For Those About to Rock (We Salute You) that the band still performs live in concert, the other being “Rock ‘N’ Roll Train”.

The Jack

“The Jack” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the third track of their Australian album T.N.T, released in December 1975, and was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young, and Bon Scott. It is also the third track on the international version of High Voltage, released in May 1976.
“The Jack” has been included on all of the band’s official live albums: If You Want Blood You’ve Got It (sung by Bon Scott, 1978), Live and its 2 CD Collector’s Edition (sung by Scott’s replacement Brian Johnson, 1992), Live from the Atlantic Studios (Scott, 1977), and Let There Be Rock: The Movie (Scott, 1979), with the last two being released in 1997 as part of the Bonfire box set. (“Whole Lotta Rosie” is the only other AC/DC song to appear on all five.)

The live recordings of “The Jack” have very different lyrics than the original LP versions. Whereas the studio version of the song uses poker metaphors as sexual innuendo, the live version tells the story in a literal manner.

That’s the Way I Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll

“That’s the Way I Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll” is a song and a single by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. The song appeared on their 1988 album Blow Up Your Video as the second track. A live version of this song can be found on the band’s live album, Live: 2 CD Collector’s Edition. The b-side of the single was “Borrowed Time”.

In 2005, the music video, directed by Peter Sinclair, Brian Grant, and Jiff Morrison,[1] was released on Family Jewels. The video included fans carrying red cardboard Gibson SG guitars.

Stiff Upper Lip (song)

“Stiff Upper Lip” is a song by rock band AC/DC. This song is on their 2000 album Stiff Upper Lip, and it is composed by Angus and Malcolm Young. The song was released as a single, and topped the Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. It was performed on Saturday Night Live on 18 March 2000.

The music video, directed by Andy Morahan,[1] starts with the band driving down the street in a red 1997 Hummer H1 when they get caught in a traffic jam. They then pull into a back alley, get out of the car, and begin to play the song on the street. The song that the band was listening to before the car jam was “It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)”, a song released when the late Bon Scott was a member of the band.

Fly on the Wall (AC/DC album)

Fly on the Wall is an album by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It was the band’s ninth internationally released studio album and the tenth to be released in Australia. All songs were written by Angus Young (guitar), Malcolm Young (guitar), and Brian Johnson (vocals). The album was re-released in 2003 as part of the AC/DC Remasters series.

Although AC/DC’s 1983 album Flick of the Switch had gotten mixed reviews from critics, the band remained one of the biggest hard rock acts in the world. In October 1984, Atlantic Records in the United States released the EP ’74 Jailbreak, a collection of previously unheard studio tracks culled mainly from the band’s 1975 Australian debut High Voltage, which was well received by fans. In January 1985, the band took three weeks off from recording what would become Fly on the Wall to headline two nights at the 10-day Rock In Rio festival in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, appearing to over 250,000 people on 19 January with the Scorpions, Whitesnake, and Ozzy Osbourne.

Shoot to Thrill

“Shoot to Thrill” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the second track on the 1980 album Back in Black. This song is also the second track of AC/DC Live and AC/DC Live: 2 CD Collector’s Edition, and is included on the Iron Man 2 soundtrack.[1]

On 26 January 2010, a new music video for “Shoot to Thrill” was released with exclusive footage from the film Iron Man 2. The live concert footage used in the video was filmed in December 2009 at a concert in Buenos Aires, Argentina at the Estadio Monumental, from which the Live at River Plate DVD was filmed.[1]

Shake Your Foundations

“Shake Your Foundations” is a song and single by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, written by Angus and Malcolm Young and Brian Johnson.

The song was released on their 1985 album Fly on the Wall. The following year, it was remixed by Harry Vanda and George Young, who worked with AC/DC on earlier albums, and released on Who Made Who, the soundtrack to the Stephen King film Maximum Overdrive. In this remix, the song is shortened from 4:10 to 3:53. The drum track begins at seventeen seconds and the full band kicks in at 48 seconds. Also, Johnson’s vocals can be heard more clearly in the remix. Vinyl releases of the album include the remix, while most CD releases include the original version.

School Days (song )

“School Days” (also known as “School Day (Ring! Ring! Goes the Bell)”) is a rock-and-roll song written and recorded by Chuck Berry and released by Chess Records as a single in March 1957 and on the LP After School Session two months later (see 1957 in music).[1] It is one of his best-known songs and is often considered a rock-and-roll anthem.

The last verse of the song contains the lyrics “Hail, hail rock and roll / Deliver me from the days of old.” Hail! Hail! Rock and Roll became the title of a 1987 concert film and documentary about Berry. Much of the song’s musical arrangement was reused by Berry in 1964 in “No Particular Place to Go”. The same arrangement was also used for “Big Ben Blues”, a very rare recording.

Satellite Blues

“Satellite Blues” is a song by Australian rock band AC/DC, released as a single, and appeared on their 2000 album, Stiff Upper Lip. It peaked at No. 23 on the ARIA Singles Chart.[1] This was AC/DC’s last single until the release of 2008’s “Rock ‘N Roll Train” from Black Ice.

In the United States Billboard magazine, it reached No. 7 on their Mainstream Rock chart.[2]

Safe in New York City

“Safe in New York City” is a song by rock group AC/DC, from their 2000 album Stiff Upper Lip. The song, which was written by members and brothers, Angus and Malcolm Young, was released as a single on 28 February 2000.[1][2] It was co-produced by their older brother George and the band.[1] It reached No. 21 on the US Billboard Mainstream Rock chart.[3]

The video to the song, directed by Andy Morahan,[4] shows the band playing a busy tunnel in the city, surrounded by armed police officers. The promo CD single contained a live version of the song, which was recorded on the 13th of September 2000 at the America West Arena in Phoenix, Arizona. This live version was later re-released nine years later on the box set Backtracks.

The track gained poignancy after September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City. Angus Young said that although originally the lyrics were meant to make fun of Rudy Giuliani’s claim that he had cleaned up Manhattan: “to me New York is a city where you can never predict what’s coming next.” [5] The song was later included in the 2001 Clear Channel memorandum, a list of “lyrically questionable” songs.

Rock or Bust (song)

“Rock or Bust” is the second single and first track from the album of the same name by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It was written by Angus Young and Malcolm Young. It was released for downloads on 17 November 2014, as a follow-up for the band’s first officially released single from the album titled “Play Ball”.

AC/DC drummer Phil Rudd was absent from the video shoot for the single, and was replaced by Welshman Bob Richards, who had previously played with Man, Adrian Smith, Asia and Shogun.[1]

Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation

“Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation” is a single by the Australian rock band AC/DC, and the first track on their Powerage album, released in 1978. The single version is an abbreviated version of the album track, with a time of 3:05, as opposed to the album track’s length of 3:37. The album track “Sin City” was the B-side in the UK, Germany, Belgium, and Japan. In the US, Canada, and the Netherlands, it was “Kicked in the Teeth,” also from the album. In Australia, however, the B-side was “Cold Hearted Man,” which appeared on initial UK and European pressings of the album, and was eventually removed when “Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation” was added (see below).

Written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young and Bon Scott, it was played live by the band during the Powerage tour, and was also played live during the 2003 world tour, sung by Brian Johnson, Scott’s replacement. It also appeared on the 1978 live album If You Want Blood You’ve Got It. The song also featured on the soundtrack album for Iron Man 2.

“Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation” was the final track recorded during the Powerage sessions, after the record company persuaded the band to go back into the studio and come up with a radio-friendly single that could garner some airplay.[1] The move found some success, giving the band its first charting single in the UK where it peaked at #24.[2] The song features handclaps and maracas and does not have a traditional guitar solo, unlike most other AC/DC songs.

On the first pressing of the UK version of Powerage, “Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation” does not appear; side 1 opens with “Gimme a Bullet”. Some later UK and European pressings tacked the single version of “Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation” on as the opening track of the album. Eventually the full version of the song became the standard.

“Cold Hearted Man,” which had appeared on initial UK and European pressings, was removed from the album around the time that “Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation” was added. However, a 10-track LP including both songs does exist in (at least) the UK (catalog number K 50483 (SD19180), which is identical to the 9-track version), Germany (ATL 50 483), and Portugal (ATL 50483 SD 19180).)[3]

Rock and Roll Ain’t Noise Pollution

“Rock and Roll Ain’t Noise Pollution” is a song by the rock band AC/DC. It is the tenth and final track of the album released in 1980 Back in Black. It is the fourth and final single released of the album. The song reached number 15 on the UK singles charts, the highest placing of any song on the album.

The band started work on the album just three days after the funeral of Bon Scott, lead singer of the band from late 1974 to 1980. Malcolm Young later explained that “I thought, ‘Well, fuck this, I’m not gonna sit around mopin’ all fucking year.’ So I just rang Angus and said, ‘Do you wanna come back and rehearse?'”. The album was recorded with Brian Johnson, who officially joined the band on April 8, 1980. Angus Young said that, “We knew if Bon liked him, he must be good, because Bon didn’t like many people'”.[citation needed]

During the intro, Brian Johnson lights a cigarette and takes a pull from it.

The song also appears in videos like “No Bull” (1996), “Family Jewels” (2005) and “Plug Me In” (2007), also appears on the boxset “Bonfire” (1997).

The song appears on the 2003 tribute album by various artists to the band Back in Baroque: The String Tribute to AC / DC, it was also covered in 2004 by death metal band Six Feet Under in the album Graveyard Classics 2. Alex Gibson also covered the song in 2008 from the album Rockabye Baby!: Lullaby Renditions of AC/DC. The song was also featured in a commercial for Nike in 2006.[1] The song was featured in a commercial for Applebee’s commercial in 2016.[2]

It is also the walk-up song for Chicago White Sox first-baseman Justin Morneau.

Ride On (AC/DC song)

“Ride On” is a song and single by Australian hard rock band AC/DC originally released on the album Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap and later re-released on the album Who Made Who. In both versions, the song is sung by Bon Scott. Atypically for an AC/DC song, it has a sad, slow blues, almost ballad-like feel to it. The lyrics concern a man reflecting on mistakes he has made in a relationship while drinking alcohol. It has frequently been cited as one of AC/DC’s best songs.[1][2][3]

“Ride On” was covered by the French band Trust on their self-titled 1979 debut album after supporting AC/DC in Paris, France in the fall of 1978. Bon Scott jammed the song with Trust at Scorpio Sound Studios in London, England on February 13, 1980, six days before his death. A recording of it would later surface on the Bon Scott Forever Volume 1 bootleg.

AC/DC played the song live only once, on June 22, 2001, during the Stiff Upper Lip Tour. Brian Johnson sang the song as a tribute to Bon Scott.

Play Ball (song)

“Play Ball” is a single by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, and the debut single from their 2014 album Rock or Bust. It was first used on 27 September 2014 in a trailer for Major League Baseball on TBS postseason coverage,[1] and the single was released on 7 October.

AC/DC drummer Phil Rudd was absent from the video shoot for the single, and was replaced by Welshman Bob Richards, who had previously played with Man, Adrian Smith, Asia and Shogun.[2]

The Minnesota Twins, a Major League Baseball team, play the song at home in the Target Field directly after the game’s lineup is announced. It plays for about two minutes before the game starts. The Danish basketball team, Svendborg Rabbits, play the song in connection with the gamestarts at home in The Rabbits House.

Night Prowler (song)

“Night Prowler” is the final track on AC/DC’s album Highway to Hell. It is known among other AC/DC songs for its slow blues rhythm, ominous lyrics, as well as its controversy stemming from its association with the Richard Ramirez serial killings in 1985.
In June 1985, a highly publicized murder case began revolving around Richard Ramírez, who was responsible for more than 15 brutal murders as well as attempted murders and rapes in Los Angeles. Nicknamed the “Night Stalker,” Ramírez was a fan of AC/DC, particularly the song “Night Prowler”. Police also claimed that Ramírez was wearing an AC/DC shirt and left an AC/DC hat at one of his crime scenes. During the trial, Ramírez shouted “Hail Satan!” and showed off the pentagram carved into his palm. The incident brought extremely bad publicity to the band, whose concerts and albums were suddenly campaigned against by parents in Los Angeles County.[1] On VH1’s Behind the Music on AC/DC, the band claimed that while the song had taken on a murderous connotation by Ramírez, it is actually about a boy sneaking into his girlfriend’s bedroom at night. However, the song lyrics contain lines that seem to contradict the band’s explanation, such as: “You don’t feel the steel/Till it’s hanging out your back… as you lie there naked, like a body in a tomb”.[2]

Nervous Shakedown

“Nervous Shakedown” is the fourth song on the AC/DC album Flick of the Switch, released in 1983. It was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young, and Brian Johnson. It charted in the UK at No. 35, staying on the charts for five weeks.[1] It also reached No. 20 in Ireland.[2]

“Nervous Shakedown” was released as a maxi-single or EP in 1984. The songs included on this release are: A1. “Nervous Shakedown”; A2. “Rock And Roll Ain’t Noise Pollution” (live Detroit ’83); B1. “Sin City” (live Detroit ’83); B2. “This House Is on Fire” (live Detroit ’83).

Two videos were made for the track. The first video was filmed on the same set and in the same format as the videos for “Flick of the Switch” and “Guns For Hire”. However, another version was filmed which features the group on stage at the Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, MI, during a before-show rehearsal.

Moneytalks

“Moneytalks” is a song written by Malcolm and Angus Young and produced by Bruce Fairbairn for the hard rock band AC/DC. Originally released on 21 September 1990 on the album The Razors Edge, it was later released as a single in December later that year. A live version of the song recorded on the band’s 1990-1991 Razors Edge World Tour appeared on AC/DC’s 1992 live album, Live .

The song is one of AC/DC’s biggest hits, breaking the top 40 on the Billboard Hot 100, the UK Singles Charts, and the Australian ARIA Singles Chart. It is still the band’s highest charting single in the United States, at number 23 (no other AC/DC single has even cracked the top 30). During their subsequent world tour, thousands of “Angus Bucks” were dropped on the audience during the song. A music video of the song, directed by David Mallet, was also released, featuring a live performance during the tour.

The song appears in the trailer to the 2011 film, Moneyball.

Money Made

“Money Made” is the fourth single from Australian rock band AC/DC from their fifteenth studio album Black Ice. The song was released only through radio airplay in Australia in July 2009,[1] and in the UK as a CD along with “War Machine”.[2] Angus Young declared that his inspiration for the song was the obsession with money in United States – “The focus seems to be, ‘How do we get money out of this? Do we keep that school? Is there a profit in it? Do we really need that new hospital? Can you not die quicker? Do we really have to spend money on that medicine? How old are you now?’ Sometimes you think, ‘Can we all take one deep breath?’ The basics have got to be in place. Thirty years ago, a fuckin’ school never made money. Filling in a road or putting up a traffic light didn’t make money. Hospitals were there to keep people well, not make money.”[3] Bassist Cliff Williams has stated it is his favourite track from Black Ice, saying, “It has a chaingang vibe to it.”[citation needed]

Love at First Feel

“Love at First Feel” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the second track of the international version of their album Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, released in November 1976 (see 1976 in music), and was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young, and Bon Scott. The international version was not released in the United States until April 1981 (see 1981 in music).

“Love at First Feel” was not included on Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap’s original Australian edition, released in September 1976, making it one of only two tracks from international AC/DC albums not available on the band’s Australian albums. (The other is “Cold Hearted Man”, released on European pressings of Powerage) Conversely, several songs that are available on Australian AC/DC albums did not see overseas release until more than thirty years later. However, “Love at First Feel” was released in Australia as a single in January 1977, with “Problem Child” as its B-side, which peaked in the Kent Music Report Singles Chart Top 100.[1]

Singer/songwriter Mark Kozelek does a cover of this track on his album of AC/DC covers entitled What’s Next to the Moon.

French band Trust, who supported AC/DC on their Paris, France date in the fall of 1978, re-worked “Love At First Feel” with French lyrics for their 1978 single, “Prends Pas Ton Flingue” b/w “Paris By Night.” The song later became the title track of their 1988 live album, Paris By Night.

Let’s Get It Up

“Let’s Get It Up” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, first released on their 1981 album For Those About to Rock We Salute You, and later as its first single.[1]

Singer Brian Johnson summarised the track to Kerrang!’s Sylvie Simmons as “Filth, pure filth. We’re a filthy band.”[2]

Live versions of “Back in Black” and “T.N.T.”, released as B-sides on the UK’s version of the single, were both recorded in Landover, Maryland, in December 1981. “T.N.T.” only appeared on the 12-inch edition.[3]

Let There Be Rock (song)

“Let There Be Rock” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the third and title track of their album Let There Be Rock, released in March 1977, and was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young, and Bon Scott.

It was also released as a single, with a B-side of “Problem Child”, in 1977.

The song provides an encapsulated, fictionalised version of the history of rock ‘n’ roll. Building on a line from the Chuck Berry song “Roll Over Beethoven”: “… tell Tchaikovsky the news”, “Let There Be Rock” reveals that Tchaikovsky did in fact receive the message and subsequently shared it with the masses, resulting in the rise of rock ‘n’ roll.

Following rock’s birth, rock bands appeared everywhere, musicians found fame (while businesses made money off their efforts), and millions of people learned how to play electric guitar. The third and final verse speaks of a “42-decibel” rock band playing good, loud music in an establishment called “The Shaking Hand”. This is usually changed to “92-decibel” in live versions of the song. After the final verse, the song ends with an extended solo by Angus Young, which consists mainly of fast picking, string bends, and hammer-ons.

Jailbreak (AC/DC song)

“Jailbreak” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the ninth and final track of their third Australian album Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, released in September 1976. The song was not released in North America until 1984. It was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young, and Bon Scott.[1]

It was first released as a single in Australia and the UK in mid-1976, with the non-album track “Fling Thing” as its B-side. The single was re-issued in the UK in 1980 with a picture sleeve.[1]

As “Jailbreak” was only included on the Australian version of Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, and not on its international counterpart, it did not see a release in the United States, Canada, and Japan until October 1984 as part of the international ’74 Jailbreak EP. A promo-only single, with “Show Business” as its B-side, was released to radio stations in the US at the time.

It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)

“It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock ‘n’ Roll)” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the first track of the group’s album T.N.T., released in December 1975, and was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young and Bon Scott. The song is notable for combining bagpipes with hard rock instrumentation; in the middle section of the song there is a call and response between the bagpipes and guitar.[1] The original recording is in B-flat major, but it was played live in A major.[2]

A slightly shortened version of the song is also the first track on the international version of High Voltage, released in May 1976. This version appears only on the vinyl release and the 2003 CD reissue.

The full version of the song is also on the Volts CD of the Bonfire box set, released in 1997.

This was a signature song for Scott. Current AC/DC lead vocalist Brian Johnson does not perform it, out of respect for his predecessor.[3]

I’m a Rebel (song)

“I’m a Rebel” is a hard rock song written by Alex Young, elder brother of AC/DC guitarists Angus and Malcolm Young.

“I’m a Rebel” was recorded,[2] but never released,[3] by the popular Australian hard rock band AC/DC. They had recording sessions outside Albert Productions without George Young and Harry Vanda. After a show in Maschen, Germany, promoter Rudy Holzhauer asked the band to record Alexander Young’s song in Studio Maschen. AC/DC then recorded the song in a few hours.[4] Bon Scott was very drunk when the song was recorded. Nevertheless, Accept guitarist Wolf Hoffmann claimed in an interview that this recording was “way better” than Accept’s result.[5]

The AC/DC recording remains in Albert Productions’ vaults, and was not included in the Bonfire nor Backtracks box sets which released much of the band’s rarities.

Highway to Hell

Highway to Hell is an album by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It was the band’s fifth internationally released studio album and the sixth to be released in Australia. It was the last album featuring lead singer Bon Scott, who died early the following year on Tuesday, 19 February 1980.

By 1978, AC/DC had released five albums internationally and had toured Australia and Europe extensively. In 1977, they landed in America and, with virtually no radio support, began to amass a live following. The band’s most recent album, the live If You Want Blood, had reached #13 in Britain, and the two albums previous to that, 1977’s Let There Be Rock and 1978’s Powerage, had seen the band find their raging, rhythm and blues-based hard rock sound. Although the American branch of Atlantic Records had rejected the group’s 1976 LP Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, it now believed the band was poised to strike it big in the States if only they would work with a producer who could give them a radio-friendly sound. Since their 1975 Australian debut High Voltage, all of AC/DC’s albums had been produced by George Young and Harry Vanda. According to the book AC/DC: Maximum Rock & Roll, the band was not enthusiastic about the idea, especially guitarists Angus Young and Malcolm Young, who felt a strong sense of loyalty to their older brother George:

High Voltage (song)

“High Voltage” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It was first released in Australia as a single in July 1975, and it is the eighth track of their second Australian album T.N.T. The song was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young and Bon Scott, and peaked at #48 on the UK Singles Chart in 1980.[1]

“High Voltage” shares its name with the band’s first Australian and international albums. It is the ninth and final track on the international version, released in May 1976. “High Voltage” was also released as a single in the UK and various countries in Europe in 1976.

Although Phil Rudd is erroneously credited with recording the song, the drums were actually recorded by a session drummer Tony Currenti, not long after recording sessions for the debut album High Voltage.[2]

“High Voltage” is one of AC/DC’s most popular songs, and has been included on four of the band’s five official live releases: If You Want Blood You’ve Got It (sung by Bon Scott, 1978), Live: 2 CD Collector’s Edition (sung by Scott’s replacement Brian Johnson, 1992), Live from the Atlantic Studios (Scott, 1977), and Let There Be Rock: The Movie (Scott, 1979) – the latter two being released in 1997 as part of the Bonfire box set.

In concerts, this song has evolved into sing-a-long with the crowd. In the bridge where Scott sings ‘I said high, I said high’, this has been extended where both Scott and Brian Johnson repeat the word ‘high’ in ever increasing loudness and high pitch, to which the crowd responds with “high” louder also. That is followed by a discreet backing rhythm for several minutes whilst Angus Young does some improvisation on the guitar.

During the 2010 Black Ice World Tour, images of Scott were projected onto the stage screens during the performance of the song’s chorus to commemorate the 30th anniversary of his death.[3]

Hells Bells (song)

“Hells Bells” is the first track of Australian hard rock band AC/DC’s first album without Bon Scott, Back in Black. “Hells Bells” is the second single from Back in Black, released in the fall of 1980. The song also appears on Who Made Who, AC/DC’s 1986 soundtrack to the Stephen King movie Maximum Overdrive and on both versions of 1992’s AC/DC Live.

Heatseeker (song)

“Heatseeker” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. The song appeared on their 1988 album Blow Up Your Video as the first track. The song was later on Live. The song was also released as a single in various formats, with “Go Zone” as the main B-side. On reaching No.12 in the UK singles chart in 1988, it became their biggest UK chart hit and remained so for 25 years until Highway to Hell reached No.4 in December 2013.

Hard as a Rock

“Hard as a Rock” is a song and a single by the Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It features as the first track on their album, Ballbreaker, released in 1995. It became their second No. 1 song on the Album Rock Tracks chart, following 1993’s “Big Gun”. Live performances are also included on three of AC/DC’s live concert DVDs, No Bull (of which an audio version is found on the Australian tour edition of Stiff Upper Lip), Stiff Upper Lip Live and Live At The Circus Krone, which is featured in the Deluxe Edition of the 2009 boxset Backtracks. A live version recorded during the band’s Stiff Upper Lip World Tour in 2001 at the Stade de France in Paris appears on the 2007 Plug Me In three-disc DVD. It’s also featured on the 2012 film Battleship, along with Thunderstruck.

Hail Caesar (song)

“Hail Caesar” is a song by the Australian rock band AC/DC, which was written by members and brothers, Angus and Malcolm Young.[1][2] It is from their 1995 album Ballbreaker and was issued on 18 February 1996 as a single.[1] The lyrics, “All Hail Caesar”, are a reference to the salute given to Roman general Julius Caesar. An edited version of the song at 4:30 appeared only on promo releases of the single. Commercial single releases and the Ballbreaker album contain the full version at 5:14. The single reached the top 100 ARIA Singles Chart.[1]

Guns for Hire

“Guns for Hire” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, from their album Flick of the Switch, released on 15 August 1983. Written by band members, Angus Young, Malcolm Young and Brian Johnson, it was also released in August as a single with “Landslide” as the B-side. It charted at No. 37 on the UK Singles Chart,[1] and No. 84 on the United States Billboard Hot 100.[2] It also reached No. 19 in Ireland.[3]

The track served as the opening song during the band’s performances during the ensuing tour in support of Flick of the Switch, but has never been performed on any other AC/DC tours since.[citation needed] A promotional video was produced for the song, which featured drummer Simon Wright rather than Phil Rudd. Rudd had left the band during the recording of Flick of the Switch and was replaced by Wright before the start of the tour.

Girls Got Rhythm

“Girls Got Rhythm” is a song by popular rock band AC/DC. It is found on their 1979 album Highway to Hell. The song was released as a single the same year.

An EP was released in 1979 containing the songs: A1. “Girls Got Rhythm”; A2. “If You Want Blood (You’ve Got It)”; B1. “Hell Ain’t a Bad Place to Be” (live; taken from If You Want Blood); B2. “Rock and Roll Damnation” (live; taken from If You Want Blood).

For Those About to Rock (We Salute You) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“For Those About to Rock (We Salute You)” is a song by the Australian hard rock band AC/DC. The song was first released on AC/DC’s eighth studio album For Those About to Rock We Salute You in 1981, and later as a single in 1982. The single’s B-side contains an edited live version of “Let There Be Rock”, recorded in Landover, Maryland, in late-1981. The video to “For Those About to Rock (We Salute You)” was filmed at that same concert.

The song was later included on AC/DC’s first soundtrack album, Who Made Who, released in 1986 for the Stephen King film Maximum Overdrive.

The title and central lyric of the song are based on an ancient salute used by Roman prisoners to be executed in the Colosseum, “Ave, Caesar, morituri te salutant” (“Hail Caesar, we who are about to die, salute you.”). However, Angus Young later said that the inspiration for the cannons came from a very different source.[1] The band was cutting the first recordings of the song on the same day as Princess Diana of Great Britain’s televised wedding. Angus recalled that “someone had the wedding on in the next room … we were playing that part of the song when the cannons were going off and we paused a second and went ‘hmmm … that actually sounds pretty good.'”[citation needed] This coincidence also led to a cannon being featured on the cover of the album and single, as well as life-sized Napoleonic cannons becoming a regular stage prop at AC/DC concerts. The cannons fired in the song are mixed with exploding fireworks. However the actual takes were recorded later the next month as the mobile truck used to record the album (Mobile One) was being used to record Peter Gabriel’s 4th eponymous album during the marriage of Charles and Diana.

AC/DC have often used the song to close live concerts, such as Live at Donington and No Bull as well as on their live CD AC/DC Live. It is also the song that concludes the most recent tour, Rock or Bust.

Bonny (instrumental)

“Bonny” is an instrumental performed by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, based on the traditional Scottish ballad The Bonnie Banks O’ Loch Lomond. Originally recorded by the band in 1976 as “Fling Thing”, it was released on the B-side of the “Jailbreak” single, and more recently, on Backtracks.

After the death of the band’s original lead singer, Bon Scott, it continued to be featured in the band’s live set, arguably as a tribute to him. However, the song is only played at every gig held in Glasgow, Scotland,[1] such as, for example, the show on June 30, 2009 during the band’s Black Ice World Tour. A recorded live version of the track with its alternative title of “Bonny” was featured on AC/DC’s live album, Live: 2 CD Collector’s Edition, recorded at the only Scottish date of the Razors Edge World Tour. Those who listen carefully can hear the fans sing the words. Only Angus Young plays the riff to this song.

Lyrics

Oh, ye’ll tak the high road, and I’ll tak the low road,
And I’ll be in Scotland afore ye;
But me and my true love will never meet again
On the bonnie, bonnie banks o’ Loch Lomond

Dog Eat Dog ( song )

“Dog Eat Dog” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the second track of their album Let There Be Rock, released in 1977, and was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young, and Bon Scott.

It was released as a single in Australia, and included the non-album track “Carry Me Home” on the B-side, which was later released on Backtracks.

AC/DC played “Dog Eat Dog” on their Black Ice World Tour until early 2010 when they dropped it from the set list and added “High Voltage”.

Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap (song)

“Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the title track and first track of their album Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, released in September 1976, and was written by Angus Young, Malcolm Young, and Bon Scott.

It was also released as a single – first in Australia in October 1976 with “R.I.P. (Rock in Peace)” as its B-side, and then in the UK in January 1977 as a maxi-single with “Big Balls” and “The Jack” as its B-sides. Once the Dirty Deeds album was finally released in the US in 1981 the “Dirty Deeds …” single was released there (backed by “Highway To Hell”), where it reached number four on the then-new Top Tracks chart.

The song ranked No. 24 on VH1’s 40 Greatest Metal Songs[1] and in 2009 it was named the 31st best hard rock song of all time also by VH1.[2]

It features a backing vocal consisting of a heavy breathing sound, made on the downbeat during verses. It also features the title in a spoken-word style at the end of the chorus; plus a scream at the end of the song. The full-length recording (approximately 4:11) has the title of the song chanted four times starting at 3:09, but on the more common edited version (approximately 3:51) the chant is heard only twice.

Danger (AC/DC song)

“Danger” is a single by Australian rock band AC/DC, from the album Fly on the Wall released in 1985. It was written by Brian Johnson, Angus Young, and Malcolm Young.

In most territories, the single’s b-side was “Back in Business”, but in Australia and New Zealand, “Hell or High Water” was featured.

Cover You in Oil

“Cover You in Oil” is a song by the Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It features a typically licentious lyric (“I see a young girl in the neighbourhood … I must confess I’d like to run my hands up and down her legs …”). It was released as the third single from their 1995 album Ballbreaker. The B-sides of the single were fellow album tracks “Love Bomb” and “Ballbreaker”. It reached #9 at the Mainstream Rock chart.[1]

Can I Sit Next to You, Girl

“Can I Sit Next to You, Girl” is the debut single by Australian hard rock band AC/DC issued on 22 July 1974. On August 26, 1974, the song peaked at number 50 on the Aria charts and then disappeared. This version has lead vocals performed by Dave Evans prior to his being replaced by Bon Scott, as well as drums by ex-Masters Apprentices member Colin Burgess and bass guitar by ex-The Easybeats member George Young (older brother of band cofounders Malcolm Young & Angus Young; co-producer). Originally, AC/DC’s first bassist, Larry Van Kriedt, played the bass parts, but George recorded his own over them later.[3] In 1975, after Scott joined, the group re-wrote and re-recorded the song as the seventh track on their Australia-only album T.N.T., released in December 1975 (see 1975 in music), and as the sixth track on the international version of High Voltage, released in May 1976. The title of this version of the song removed the comma, becoming “Can I Sit Next To You Girl”.[4]

Bonny (instrumental)

“Bonny” is an instrumental performed by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, based on the traditional Scottish ballad The Bonnie Banks O’ Loch Lomond. Originally recorded by the band in 1976 as “Fling Thing”, it was released on the B-side of the “Jailbreak” single, and more recently, on Backtracks.

After the death of the band’s original lead singer, Bon Scott, it continued to be featured in the band’s live set, arguably as a tribute to him. However, the song is only played at every gig held in Glasgow, Scotland,[1] such as, for example, the show on June 30, 2009 during the band’s Black Ice World Tour. A recorded live version of the track with its alternative title of “Bonny” was featured on AC/DC’s live album, Live: 2 CD Collector’s Edition, recorded at the only Scottish date of the Razors Edge World Tour. Those who listen carefully can hear the fans sing the words. Only Angus Young plays the riff to this song.

Big Jack (song)

“Big Jack” is a song by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. It is the second single and the third track on the band’s album, Black Ice.[2] This song was number 53 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 100 Best Songs of 2008.[3] The song was also featured in an episode of CSI: Miami entitled “Divorce Party”. It is rumored the song was inspired by a man Angus hung out with in Memphis while on the Stiff Upper Lip tour.

It is also one of the songs from the album “Black Ice” that was played on the Black Ice World Tour that commenced in October 2008 and ended in June 2010.[4]

Big Gun

“Big Gun” is a song by AC/DC. It was released as a single in 1993 and can be heard on the soundtrack to the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie Last Action Hero, as well as during reruns of the Savage Nation talk show as bumper music. It was later released on the 2009 box set Backtracks. It became the band’s first No. 1 on the Album Rock Tracks chart in 1993.

AC/DC has played the song live only once during 1996 rehearsals but never at an official show.[1]

Back in Black (song)

“Back in Black” is a song by AC/DC, appearing as the first track on side two of their 1980 album of the same name. Known for its opening guitar riff, the song was AC/DC’s tribute to their former singer Bon Scott. His replacement Brian Johnson recalled to Mojo magazine in 2009 that when the band asked him to write a lyric for this song, “they said, ‘it can’t be morbid – it has to be for Bon and it has to be a celebration.'” He added: “I thought, ‘Well no pressure there, then’ (laughs). I just wrote what came into my head, which at the time seemed like mumbo, jumbo. ‘Nine lives. Cats eyes. Abusing every one of them and running wild.’ The boys got it though. They saw Bon’s life in that lyric.”[2] It peaked in the U.S. at No. 37 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1981 and was No. 51 on Billboard’s Top Tracks chart, which debuted in March 1981. “Back in Black” received the RIAA’s Master Ringtone Sales Award (Gold and Platinum) in 2006 and reached 2× Platinum status in 2007.

The song was ranked No. 4 by VH1 on their list of the 40 Greatest Metal Songs,[3] and in 2009, it was named the second greatest hard rock song of all time by VH1.[4] It was also ranked No. 187 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[5] The same magazine has also ranked “Back in Black” No. 29 on “The 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time”.[1]

In 2010, this song came No. 2 in Triple M’s Ultimate 500 Rock Countdown in Melbourne, Australia. The top five were all AC/DC songs.[6]

It officially charted on the UK charts after 31 years in release; peaking in at no. 27[7] as a result of AC/DC music becoming available on iTunes. It also reached no. 1 on the UK Rock Charts in the same week.[8]

Baby, Please Don’t Go

“Baby, Please Don’t Go” is a blues song which has been called “one of the most played, arranged, and rearranged pieces in blues history” by music historian Gerard Herzhaft.[1] Its roots have been traced back to nineteenth-century American songs which deal with themes of bondage and imprisonment. Delta blues musician Big Joe Williams popularized the song with several versions beginning in 1935.

After World War II, Chicago blues and rhythm and blues artists adapted the song to newer music styles. In 1952, a doo-wop version by the Orioles reached the top ten on the race records chart. In 1953, Muddy Waters recorded the song as an electric Chicago-ensemble blues piece, which influenced many subsequent renditions. By the early 1950s, the song became a blues standard.

In the 1960s, “Baby, Please Don’t Go” became a popular rock song after the Northern Irish group Them recorded it in 1964. Several music writers have identified Jimmy Page, a studio guitarist at the time, as participating in the recording, although his exact contributions are unclear. Subsequently, Them’s uptempo rock arrangement also made it a rock standard. “Baby, Please Don’t Go” has been inducted into both the Blues and Rock and Roll Halls of Fame.

Are You Ready (AC/DC song)

“Are You Ready” is a song by AC/DC. It is featured on the band’s 1990 hit album The Razors Edge. A live version of the song recorded on the tour of the same name appeared on one of AC/DC’s two live albums of 1992, Live: 2 CD Collector’s Edition.

The music video to this song, directed by David Mallet,[1] shows prisoners attending an AC/DC mini-concert at their prison. One prisoner is being dressed up to get ready for the band to play the song. Guards shave his head nearly bald, leaving hairs that make up AC/DC’s logo, the one similar to the cover of the band’s music video tape, Clipped.

The song rose to number 16 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.[2]

The song was featured in the 2001 movie Rock Star.

The prison venue in the video game Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock is nearly identical to the stage that the band appears on in the music video for “Are You Ready”.

The song was played on the Big Ten Network for college basketball games in 2007 and 2008.

German football club 1.FSV Mainz 05 plays the song during half time.

Anything Goes (AC/DC song)

“Anything Goes” is a song by the Australian hard rock group AC/DC. It is the fourth track from their album Black Ice. “Anything Goes” is one of five songs from the album that were played live on their Black Ice World Tour, however it was removed from the setlist on 25 October 2009 and was not played for the remainder of the tour. The single cover for Anything Goes is only the second AC/DC cover to feature frontman Brian Johnson alone (the 1986 re-release of “You Shook Me All Night Long” was the first); others have shown either the band or Angus Young.

The music video for “Anything Goes”, which was released on Family Jewels Disc 3 as part of the 2009 box set Backtracks, was filmed live in Paris on 25 and 27 February by David Mallet.[1]

“Anything Goes” was a last-time addition to Black Ice, written as the album was being recorded.[2] The song’s main riff bears a marked resemblance to the main riff of “The Shape of Things to Come” by The Headboys, which was a minor hit in 1979.[citation needed]

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