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Mama, You Been on My Mind

“Mama, You Been on My Mind” is a song by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. Written in 1964 during a trip to Europe, the song dealt with his recent breakup with his girlfriend, Suze Rotolo. Dylan first recorded the song in June of that year during a session for his album Another Side of Bob Dylan. However, the song was not included on the album, and Dylan’s version remained unreleased until 1991. In total, in the 1990s and 2000s four versions were put out on Dylan’s Bootleg Series of releases, including two live performances with Joan Baez from 1964 and 1975.

Many artists have covered the song, including Baez, Jeff Buckley, Judy Collins, Ricky Nelson, Johnny Cash, George Harrison, Dion and the Belmonts, Linda Ronstadt, and Rod Stewart on his 1972 album Never a Dull Moment. Dylan himself has performed the song more than 200 times.

Stuck Inside a Cloud

“Stuck Inside a Cloud” is a song by George Harrison and is the seventh track to his posthumous album Brainwashed. It was released to radio stations in the United States and the United Kingdom in 2002, peaking at number 27 on Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart in the US in 2003.

Harrison’s favourite number was seven, and his favourite track on any of his albums was always the seventh. Dhani Harrison chose “Stuck Inside a Cloud” as his personal favourite track from his father’s Brainwashed album, and thus gave it the “honour” of being the seventh track. Dhani Harrison explains in detail his late father’s system for picking the sequence of songs on his albums on the Brainwashed DVD bundled with the bonus edition.

Any Road

“Any Road” is a song by George Harrison and is the opening track to his posthumous album, Brainwashed. It was written in 1988 during the making of a video for his 1987 album, Cloud Nine.

The only known public performance of “Any Road” was in 1997, by Harrison, at the suggestion of Sukanya Rajan during an interview with Ravi Shankar conducted by VH1 (it was the last known filmed performance by Harrison).

I Live for You

“I Live for You” is a song by English musician George Harrison originally recorded during the sessions for his All Things Must Pass triple album in 1970. Long available on bootlegs, the song was finally released officially as a bonus track on the 30th anniversary reissue of All Things Must Pass in January 2001. The released recording features only Harrison’s lead vocal and Pete Drake’s prominent pedal-steel guitar from the 1970 album sessions, with all other instruments overdubbed by Harrison and his son Dhani in 2000. Despite the wealth of unreleased material recorded for All Things Must Pass, it was the only new song included with the album’s 2001 reissue. Music critics recognise “I Live for You” as one of many George Harrison compositions that can be interpreted as both a traditional love song and a devotional song.

Cheer Down

“Cheer Down” is a song with music written by George Harrison and lyrics written by Harrison and Tom Petty. The title is attributed to Olivia Harrison, who would tell her husband, “Okay, cheer down, big fellow,” when he would get too enthusiastic.[1]

The song was first produced in 1989 for the film and accompanying soundtrack to Lethal Weapon 2 and released as a single to promote the film.

It was later included in Harrison’s Dark Horse greatest hits album Best of Dark Horse 1976–1989 as the final track. Although Best of Dark Horse 1976-1989 is no longer in print, “Cheer Down” was included on the 2009 career-spanning best of album Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison. The song was produced by George Harrison and Jeff Lynne.

When We Was Fab

“When We Was Fab” is a song by English musician George Harrison, which he released on his 1987 album Cloud Nine. It was also issued as the second single from the album, in January 1988. The lyrics serve as a nostalgic reflection by Harrison on the days of Beatlemania during the 1960s, when the Beatles were first referred to as “the Fab Four.” Harrison co-wrote the song with Jeff Lynne, who also co-produced the track. The recording references the psychedelic sound that the Beatles had helped popularise in 1967, through its use of sitar, cello, and backwards-relayed effects. Harrison’s former Beatles bandmate Ringo Starr is among the other musicians on the track. The single was accompanied by an innovative music video, directed by the partnership of Kevin Godley and Lol Creme. One of Harrison’s most popular songs, “When We Was Fab” has appeared on the compilations Best of Dark Horse 1976–1989 (1989) and Let It Roll (2009).

This Is Love (George Harrison song)

“This Is Love” is a song by George Harrison, the former lead guitarist for the Beatles. Harrison co-wrote the song with Jeff Lynne. It is the fifth track on Harrison’s eleventh studio solo album, Cloud Nine, which was released in 1987. In June 1988, the song was also released as the third single from that album, peaking at number 55 on the UK Singles Chart.

The original B-side for this single was going to be “Handle with Care”, a collaboration between Harrison, Lynne, Roy Orbison and Tom Petty recorded at Bob Dylan’s studio in Santa Monica, California. When executives at Harrison’s distributor Warner Bros. Records heard the track, they decided it was too good to be released as single “filler”, a decision that resulted in the formation of the Traveling Wilburys, and the album Traveling Wilburys Vol. 1, with “Handle with Care” as the lead track and single.

Steve Wood and Daniel May composed music to the 1998 documentary film Everest, incorporating melodies from some of Harrison’s songs, one of which was “This Is Love”.[1]

Circles (George Harrison song)

“Circles” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released as the final track of his 1982 album Gone Troppo. Harrison wrote the song in India in 1968 while he and the Beatles were studying Transcendental Meditation with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. The theme of the lyrics is reincarnation. The composition reflects the cyclical aspect of human existence as, according to Hindu doctrine, the soul continues to pass from one life to the next. Although the Beatles never formally recorded it, “Circles” was among the demos the group made at Harrison’s home, Kinfauns, in May 1968, while considering material for their double album The Beatles.

Harrison revisited “Circles” during the sessions for his 1979 album George Harrison before he finally recorded it for Gone Troppo. Over this period, Harrison had softened the spiritual message in his work and had also begun to forgo the music business for a career as a film producer with his company HandMade Films. The song was produced by Harrison, Ray Cooper and former Beatles engineer Phil McDonald, with recording taking place at Harrison’s Friar Park studio between May and August 1982. The track features extensive use of keyboards and synthesizer, with Billy Preston, Jon Lord and Mike Moran among the contributing musicians.

A slow, meditative song, “Circles” has received a mixed response from reviewers, some of whom find it overly gloomy. In the United States, it was issued as the B-side of the album’s second single, “I Really Love You”, in February 1983. As the closing track on Gone Troppo, “Circles” was the last song heard on a new Harrison album until 1987, when he returned with Cloud Nine.

Dream Away (George Harrison song)

“Dream Away” is a song appearing on George Harrison’s 1982 album Gone Troppo, and released as a single in Japan. The song was featured over the end credits of Harrison’s 1981 HandMade Films production Time Bandits, which was director Terry Gilliam’s first successful solo movie, but second solo directorial effort overall.[1] Aside from the film’s orchestral score, this was the only song featured in Time Bandits, and was written specifically for it.

That Is All (song)

“That Is All” is a song by English musician George Harrison released as the final track of his 1973 album Living in the Material World. A slow, heavily orchestrated ballad, it is one of many Harrison love songs that appear to be directed at either a woman or a deity. Harrison wrote and recorded the song during the height of his public devotion to Hinduism; on release, Rolling Stone described its lyrics as “a sort of Hindu In Paradisium”.[1]

Recording for “That Is All” took place in London in late 1972, following Harrison’s completion of the international aid project begun the previous year with the Concert for Bangladesh. The other musicians on the track include keyboard players Gary Wright, whose fledgling solo career Harrison actively supported during the early 1970s, and Nicky Hopkins. The song’s orchestral and choral arrangements were provided by John Barham, who had also worked on Harrison’s album All Things Must Pass and Wright’s Footprint. “That Is All” has been covered by singers Andy Williams and Harry Nilsson.

The Day the World Gets ‘Round

“The Day the World Gets ‘Round” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1973 album Living in the Material World. Harrison was inspired to write the song following the successful Concert for Bangladesh shows, which were held in New York on 1 August 1971 as a benefit for refugees from the country formerly known as East Pakistan. The lyrics reflect his disappointment that such a humanitarian aid project was necessary, given the abundance of resources available across the planet, and his belief that if all individuals were more spiritually aware, there would be no suffering in the world. Adding to Harrison’s frustration while writing the song, the aid project became embroiled in financial problems, as commercial concerns delayed the release of the Concert for Bangladesh album, and government tax departments failed to embrace the goodwill inherent in the venture.

Harrison recorded “The Day the World Gets ‘Round” in England between October 1972 and March 1973. The recording features an orchestral arrangement by John Barham and a similarly well-regarded vocal performance from Harrison. The other contributing musicians were Nicky Hopkins, Klaus Voormann, Ringo Starr and Jim Keltner. Reviewers have described the composition variously as a protest song, a devotional prayer, and a counterpart to John Lennon’s peace anthem “Imagine”.

As with all the new songs released on Living in the Material World, Harrison donated his publishing royalties from the track to the Material World Charitable Foundation, an organisation he set up to avoid the tax problems that had befallen his Bangladesh relief effort. The song typifies Harrison’s ideal for a world unencumbered by national, religious or cultural delineation. In 2009, Voormann and Yusuf Islam covered “The Day the World Gets ‘Round” and released it as a single to benefit children in war-torn Gaza.

Be Here Now (song)

“Be Here Now” is a song by English musician George Harrison released on his 1973 album Living in the Material World. The recording features a sparse musical arrangement and recalls Harrison’s work with the Beatles during 1966–68, through its Indian-inspired mood and use of drone-like sitar. Part of Harrison’s inspiration for the composition was the popular book Be Here Now by spiritual teacher Ram Dass – specifically, a story discussing the author’s change in identity from a Western academic to a guru in the Hindu faith. Harrison biographers interpret “Be Here Now” as a comment from him on the public’s nostalgia for the past following the Beatles’ break-up.

Harrison wrote the song in Los Angeles in 1971, while working on the soundtrack to the Ravi Shankar documentary Raga, and shortly before organising the Concert for Bangladesh. The recording took place in late 1972 at his Friar Park home, with musical contributions from Klaus Voormann, Nicky Hopkins, Gary Wright and Jim Keltner. Contrary to the song’s message, its release coincided with heightened speculation regarding a possible Beatles reunion, following Harrison, Ringo Starr and John Lennon recording together in Los Angeles in March 1973.

“Be Here Now” has received critical attention for its dreamlike sound and the quality of Harrison’s acoustic guitar playing. Stephen Holden of Rolling Stone described the track as a “meltingly lovely meditation-prayer”,[1] while author Ian Inglis views it as a musical expression of “the spiritual, scientific, and metaphysical implications of time”.[2] Singers Robyn Hitchcock and Ian Astbury have each covered the song.

The Lord Loves the One (That Loves the Lord)

“The Lord Loves the One (That Loves the Lord)” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1973 album Living in the Material World. Like the album’s title track, it was inspired by the teachings of A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, founder of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), more commonly known as the Hare Krishna movement. The song is an uptempo rock track with elements of blues and gospel. Some commentators have described it as the musical highpoint of Living in the Material World, with Harrison’s slide guitar playing singled out as being among the finest performances of his career.

The composition originated during a period marked by Harrison’s devotion to a Hindu-aligned ascetic life and the height of his public association with the Hare Krishna movement, which included his donation of Bhaktivedanta Manor for use as an ISKCON temple. In his lyrics, Harrison sings of the falsehood of striving for wealth or power in the material world and advocates a direct relationship with one’s deity as a genuine life goal. In doing so, he belittles the role of political leaders, as well as his own status as a celebrated rock musician. The song’s Krishna Conscious message was also reflected in Harrison’s choice of artwork for the Material World album, specifically the reproduction of a painting from a Prabhupada-published edition of the Bhagavad Gita.

Harrison recorded “The Lord Loves the One” between October 1972 and March 1973 with session musicians Nicky Hopkins, Klaus Voormann, Jim Keltner and Jim Horn. While the music has invited critical praise, the devout assertions in Harrison’s lyrics typified what some reviewers in 1973 viewed as an overly didactic message on much of the parent album. Among reviewers in the 21st century, the composition continues to divide opinion. Although some commentators consider it an obvious choice as a live track, Harrison performed “The Lord Loves the One” only once in concert – on the opening night of his 1974 North American tour with Ravi Shankar.

Living in the Material World (song)

“Living in the Material World” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released as the title track to his 1973 solo album. In the song’s lyrics, Harrison presents a contrast between the world of material things and his spiritual goals, and the conflicting themes are represented in the musical arrangement, via juxtaposing sections in the rock genre and an Indian music setting. Inspired by Gaudiya Vaishnava teacher A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, the song promotes the need to recognise the illusory nature of human existence and escape the constant cycle of reincarnation, and thereby attain moksha in the Hindu faith. The contrasts presented in “Living in the Material World” inspired both a photograph by Ken Marcus that appeared inside the album’s gatefold cover, and designer Tom Wilkes’s incorporation of Krishna-related symbolism elsewhere in the packaging.

Harrison references his Beatles past as one of the trappings of the material world and refers by name to former bandmates John Lennon, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. The latter played drums on the track, recording for which took place in England between October 1972 and February 1973, while the other contributing musicians include Jim Horn, Gary Wright and Jim Keltner. In a production that is highly regarded by some commentators, the rock portions of “Living in the Material World” include a slide guitar solo by Harrison, saxophone, two drummers and prominent Hammond organ, whereas the meditative Indian interludes feature flute, Zakir Hussain on tabla, and a rare post-Beatle sitar performance by Harrison. Amid the favourable critical reception to the song on release, Stephen Holden of Rolling Stone termed it “an incantatory, polyrhythmic rocker with a falsetto-on-sitar refrain”.[1]

In addition to providing the title for the Living in the Material World album, the song inspired Harrison’s choice for a name for his charity, the Material World Charitable Foundation, to which he donated his publishing royalties from the composition. The 2006 reissue of the album includes a film clip of “Living in the Material World”, featuring archival footage of the vinyl LP’s manufacturing process. Film-maker Martin Scorsese used the song’s title for that of his 2011 documentary on the life of George Harrison.

Who Can See It

“Who Can See It” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1973 album Living in the Material World. The lyrics reflect Harrison’s uneasy feelings towards the Beatles’ legacy, three years after the group’s break-up, and serve as his statement of independence from expectations raised by the band’s unprecedented popularity. Some music critics and biographers suggest that he wrote the song during a period of personal anguish, following the acclaim he had received as a solo artist with the 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass and his 1971–72 Bangladesh aid project. The revelatory nature of the lyrics has encouraged comparisons between Living in the Material World and John Lennon’s primal therapy-inspired 1970 release, Plastic Ono Band.

A dramatic ballad in the Roy Orbison vein, the composition features unusual changes in time signature and a melody that incorporates musical tension. Harrison self-produced the recording, which includes heavy orchestration and a choir, both arranged by John Barham. Several commentators consider Harrison’s vocal performance on “Who Can See It” to be among the finest of his career, while his production style has been likened to that of Beatles producer George Martin. The other musicians on the track are Nicky Hopkins, Klaus Voormann, Jim Keltner and Gary Wright.

Among reviews of the song, “Who Can See It” has been described variously as an “aching, yearning masterpiece”,[1] a “song which goes on far too long to make its simple point”,[2] and an “unequivocal statement” on Harrison’s identity.[3] In line with his self-image as a musician, regardless of his past as a Beatle, Harrison included “Who Can See It” in the setlist for his 1974 North American tour with Ravi Shankar, the first tour there by a former Beatle since the band’s break-up.

Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long

“Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1973 album Living in the Material World. It was scheduled to be issued as a single in September that year, as the follow-up to “Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)”, but the release never took place. Music critics have traditionally viewed “Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long” as a highlight of the bestselling Material World album, praising its pop qualities and production, with some considering the song worthy of hit status.

Harrison wrote and recorded “Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long” during a period marked by his heightened devotion to Hindu spirituality, which coincided with marital problems with his first wife, Pattie Boyd, and the financial complications affecting his Bangladesh aid project. An upbeat love song in the tradition of early 1960s Brill Building songwriters, the composition has invited debate among commentators as to whether the lyrics are addressed to a lover such as Boyd or, like the majority of Harrison’s lyrics on Material World, to God.

Although produced by Harrison alone, the recording employs aspects of the Wall of Sound production synonymous with his former collaborator Phil Spector – through the use of reverb, two drummers and multiple acoustic rhythm guitar parts. Aside from Harrison, the musicians on the track are Gary Wright, Nicky Hopkins, Ringo Starr, Klaus Voormann and Jim Keltner. In November 1976, during filming for their joint appearance on Saturday Night Live, Harrison performed “Don’t Let Me Wait Too Long” with singer Paul Simon, but the song did not appear in the broadcast.

The Light That Has Lighted the World

“The Light That Has Lighted the World” is a song by English musician George Harrison released on his 1973 album Living in the Material World. It is viewed as a statement on Harrison’s discomfort with the attention afforded him as an ex-Beatle and features a prominent contribution from English session pianist Nicky Hopkins, along with a highly regarded slide guitar solo from Harrison. Around the time it was recorded, in late 1972, “The Light That Has Lighted the World” was rumoured to be the title track of the forthcoming album. Harrison originally intended it as a song for English singer Cilla Black, whose version of his 1970 composition “When Every Song Is Sung” he produced before starting work on Living in the Material World.

An early acoustic demo of the song, a solo performance by Harrison, appeared as the closing track on the 2012 compilation Early Takes: Volume 1 compilation. Whether intentionally or not, “The Light That Has Lighted the World” is an approximation of a verse from the Bible (John 8:12): “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”

Miss O’Dell

“Miss O’Dell” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released as the B-side of his 1973 hit single “Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)”. Like Leon Russell’s “Pisces Apple Lady”, it was inspired by Chris O’Dell, a former Apple employee, and variously assistant and facilitator to musical acts such as the Beatles, Derek & the Dominos, the Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and Santana. Harrison wrote the song in Los Angeles in April 1971 while waiting for O’Dell to pay him a visit at his rented home. As well as reflecting her failure to keep the appointment, the lyrics provide a light-hearted insight into the Los Angeles music scene and comment on the growing crisis in East Pakistan that led Harrison to stage the Concert for Bangladesh in August that year.

Harrison recorded “Miss O’Dell” in England between October 1972 and February 1973, during the sessions for his Living in the Material World album. The arrangement reflects the influence of Dylan, and the recording is notable for Harrison breaking into laughter midway through the verses. A popular B-side, “Miss O’Dell” was unavailable officially for over 30 years after this initial release, until its inclusion as a bonus track on the 2006 reissue of Material World. An alternate, laughter-free vocal take of the song circulates on Harrison bootleg CDs and was included on the DVD accompanying the deluxe edition of Living in the Material World in 2006. O’Dell named her 2009 autobiography after the song.

Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)

“Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released as the opening track of his 1973 album Living in the Material World. It was also issued as the album’s lead single, in May that year, and became Harrison’s second US number 1, after “My Sweet Lord”. In doing so, the song demoted Paul McCartney and Wings’ “My Love” from the top of the Billboard Hot 100, marking the only occasion that two former Beatles have held the top two chart positions in America. The single also reached the top ten in Britain, Canada, Australia and other countries around the world.

“Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)” is one of its author’s most popular songs, among fans and music critics, and features a series of much-praised slide-guitar solos from Harrison. The recording signalled a deliberate departure from his earlier post-Beatles work, in the scaling down of the big sound synonymous with All Things Must Pass and his other co-productions with Phil Spector over 1970–71. Aside from Harrison, the musicians on the track are Nicky Hopkins, Jim Keltner, Klaus Voormann and Gary Wright. In his lyrics, Harrison sings of his desire to be free of karma and the constant cycle of rebirth; he later described the song as “a prayer and personal statement between me, the Lord, and whoever likes it”.[1]

Harrison performed “Give Me Love” at every concert during his rare tours as a solo artist, and a live version was included on his 1992 album Live in Japan. The original studio recording appears on the compilation albums The Best of George Harrison (1976) and Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison (2009). At the Concert for George tribute to Harrison, in November 2002, Jeff Lynne performed “Give Me Love” with Andy Fairweather-Low and Marc Mann playing the twin slide-guitar parts. Marisa Monte, Dave Davies, Elliott Smith, Ron Sexsmith, Sting, James Taylor and Elton John are among the other artists who have covered the song.

Sue Me, Sue You Blues

“Sue Me, Sue You Blues” is a song written by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1973 album Living in the Material World. Harrison initially let American guitarist Jesse Ed Davis record it for the latter’s Ululu album (1972), in gratitude to Davis for his participation in the Concert for Bangladesh. When writing the song, Harrison drew inspiration from the legal issues surrounding the Beatles during the early months of 1971, particularly the lawsuit that Paul McCartney initiated in an effort to dissolve the band’s business partnership, Apple Corps.

The inclusion of “Sue Me, Sue You Blues” on Material World marked a rare example of a secular composition on Harrison’s most spiritually oriented album. Recorded at the Beatles’ Apple Studio in London, the track features his extensive use of the dobro-style resonator guitar, as well as musical contributions from Gary Wright, Nicky Hopkins, Klaus Voormann and Jim Keltner. The song’s musical mood and lyric recall aspects of old English square dance, a quality that some writers identify as mirroring the changing of sides amid the lawsuits relating to the Beatles’ break-up. Some critics have compared the track with John Lennon’s “How Do You Sleep?”; Stephen Holden of Rolling Stone magazine described it as a “clever Lennonist diatribe”.[1]

Harrison performed “Sue Me, Sue You Blues” throughout his 1974 North American tour, utilising a funk-inspired arrangement that featured musicians Willie Weeks, Andy Newmark and Tom Scott. For these performances, Harrison modified the lyrics to reflect the former Beatles uniting against manager Allen Klein. The song’s title was a phrase that Harrison and commentators adopted when referring to Beatles-related legal issues during the 1970s. A film clip containing Harrison’s 1971 demo of “Sue Me, Sue You Blues” appeared on the DVD accompanying the 2006 remaster of Living in the Material World.

Bangla Desh (song)

“Bangla Desh” is a song by English musician George Harrison. It was released as a non-album single in July 1971, to raise awareness for the millions of refugees from the country formerly known as East Pakistan, following the 1970 Bhola cyclone and the outbreak of the Bangladesh Liberation War. Harrison’s inspiration for the song came from his friend Ravi Shankar, a Bengali musician, who approached Harrison for help in trying to alleviate the suffering. “Bangla Desh” has been described as “one of the most cogent social statements in music history”[1] and helped gain international support for Bangladeshi independence by establishing the name of the fledgling nation around the world. In 2005, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan identified the song’s success in personalising the Bangladesh crisis, through its emotive description of Shankar’s request for help.

“Bangla Desh” appeared at the height of Harrison’s popularity as a solo artist, following the break-up of the Beatles and the acclaim afforded his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. It was pop music’s first charity single, and its release took place three days before the Harrison-sponsored Concert for Bangladesh shows at New York’s Madison Square Garden. The single became a top ten hit in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in Europe, and peaked at number 23 on America’s Billboard Hot 100. The recording was co-produced by Phil Spector and features contributions from Leon Russell, Jim Horn, Ringo Starr and Jim Keltner. The Los Angeles session for the song marked the start of two enduring musical associations in Harrison’s solo career, with Keltner and Horn.

Backed by these musicians and others including Eric Clapton and Billy Preston, Harrison performed “Bangla Desh” at the UNICEF concerts, on 1 August 1971, as a rousing encore. In a review of the Concert for Bangladesh live album for Rolling Stone magazine, Jon Landau identified this reading as “the concert’s single greatest performance by all concerned”.[2] The studio recording appeared on the 1976 compilation The Best of George Harrison, which remained its only official CD release until September 2014, when it was included as a bonus track on the Apple Years 1968–75 reissue of Harrison’s Living in the Material World album. Artists who have covered the song include Stu Phillips & the Hollyridge Strings and Italian saxophonist Fausto Papetti.

Deep Blue (song)

“Deep Blue” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released as the B-side to his 1971 charity single “Bangla Desh”. Harrison wrote the song in 1970, midway through the recording sessions for All Things Must Pass, and recorded it in Los Angeles the following year while organising the Concert for Bangladesh. The composition was inspired by the deteriorating condition of his mother, Louise, before she succumbed to cancer in July 1970, and by Harrison’s feelings of helplessness as he visited her in hospital in the north of England. Given the subject matter of his lyrics, “Deep Blue” also served to convey the suffering endured by the millions of refugees from war-torn Bangladesh in 1971, as sickness and disease became widespread among their makeshift camps in northern India.

Following Harrison’s work with American guitarist David Bromberg, “Deep Blue” features sparse instrumentation in the folk-blues style. It includes one of Harrison’s first uses of dobro on a recording. The song proved popular on US radio and was listed with the A-side when “Bangla Desh” peaked at number 23 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Well regarded by music critics and commentators, “Deep Blue” was unavailable officially for 35 years after this non-album single, during which it gained a reputation as an overlooked B-side. The re-release came in September 2006, when EMI included the song as a bonus track on the reissue of Harrison’s Living in the Material World album.

Hear Me Lord

“Hear Me Lord” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. It appeared as the last track on side four of the original LP format and is generally viewed as the closing song on the album, disc three being the largely instrumental Apple Jam. Harrison wrote “Hear Me Lord” in January 1969 while still in the Beatles, but it was passed over for inclusion on what became the band’s final album, Let It Be (1970).

Musically, the song is in the gospel-rock style, while the lyrics take the form of a personal prayer, in which Harrison seeks help and forgiveness from his deity. Along with “My Sweet Lord”, it is among the most overtly religious selections on All Things Must Pass. The recording was co-produced by Phil Spector and features musical contributions from Eric Clapton, Gary Wright, Billy Preston, Bobby Whitlock and other musicians from Delaney & Bonnie’s Friends band.

On release, Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone described “Hear Me Lord” as the album’s “big statement” and a “majestic plea”.[1] Harrison performed the song at the Concert for Bangladesh on 1 August 1971, during the afternoon show only, although the recording has never been issued officially.

Art of Dying (song)

“Art of Dying” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. It was written in 1966–67 when Harrison first became immersed in Hindu spirituality, and its subject matter is reincarnation – the “art” in question being the need to avoid rebirth, by limiting actions and thoughts whose consequences lead to one’s soul returning in another, earthbound life form. The song was co-produced by Phil Spector and features a hard-charging rock arrangement that has been described as “proto-disco”.[1] The backing musicians include Eric Clapton and the rest of the latter’s short-lived band Derek and the Dominos, as well as Gary Wright, Billy Preston and a teenage Phil Collins.

Since Harrison’s death in November 2001, the lyrics of “Art of Dying” have been much quoted as a comment on the nature of human existence.

I Dig Love

“I Dig Love” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. A paean to free love, it marks a departure from the more profound, spiritually oriented subject matter of much of that album. Musically, the song reflects Harrison’s early experimentation with slide guitar, a technique that he was introduced to while touring with Delaney & Bonnie and Friends in December 1969.

Typically of much of the material on All Things Must Pass, the recording features an extended line-up of musicians, including three guitarists, two drummers and three keyboard players. Among the musicians were former Delaney & Bonnie band members Eric Clapton, Bobby Whitlock and Dave Mason, along with Billy Preston and Ringo Starr. The song was co-produced by Phil Spector and recorded in London. Given the high standard of Harrison’s songwriting on All Things Must Pass, commentators and biographers have generally held “I Dig Love” in low regard and consider it to be the album’s weakest track.

Indian singer Asha Puthli and American band the Black Crowes have both covered the song. Part of Puthli’s version was sampled by British rapper Kano for his 2005 track “Reload It”.

All Things Must Pass (song)

“All Things Must Pass” is a song by English musician George Harrison, issued in November 1970 as the title track to his triple album of the same name. Billy Preston released the song originally – as “All Things (Must) Pass” – on his Apple Records album Encouraging Words (1970), after the Beatles had rejected it for inclusion on their Let It Be album in January 1969. The composition reflects the influence of the Band’s sound and communal music-making on Harrison, after he had spent time with the group in Woodstock, New York, in late 1968, while Timothy Leary’s poem “All Things Pass”, a psychedelic adaptation of the Tao Te Ching, provided inspiration for his song lyrics.

The subject matter deals with the transient nature of human existence, and in Harrison’s All Things Must Pass reading, words and music combine to reflect impressions of optimism against fatalism. On release, together with Barry Feinstein’s album cover image, commentators viewed the song as a statement on the Beatles’ break-up. Widely regarded as one of Harrison’s finest compositions, its rejection by his former band has provoked comment from biographers and reviewers. Music critic Ian MacDonald described “All Things Must Pass” as “the wisest song never recorded by The Beatles”,[1] while author Simon Leng considers it “perhaps the greatest solo Beatle composition”.[2] The recording was co-produced by Phil Spector in London; it features an orchestral arrangement by John Barham and contributions from musicians such as Ringo Starr, Pete Drake, Bobby Whitlock, Eric Clapton and Klaus Voormann.

Although the Beatles failed to formally record the song, a 1969 solo demo by Harrison appears on their compilation Anthology 3 (1996). An early version from the All Things Must Pass sessions was released on Harrison’s posthumous compilation Early Takes: Volume 1 in 2012. Paul McCartney performed “All Things Must Pass” at the Concert for George tribute in November 2002, a year after Harrison’s death. Jim James, the Waterboys, Klaus Voormann and Yusuf Islam, and Sloan Wainwright are among the other artists who have covered the song.

Awaiting on You All

“Awaiting on You All” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album, All Things Must Pass. Along with the single “My Sweet Lord”, it is among the more overtly religious compositions on All Things Must Pass, and the recording typifies co-producer Phil Spector’s influence on the album, due to his liberal use of reverberation and other Wall of Sound production techniques. Harrison recorded the track in London backed by musicians such as Eric Clapton, Bobby Whitlock, Klaus Voormann, Jim Gordon and Jim Price – many of whom he had toured with, as Delaney & Bonnie and Friends, in December 1969, while still officially a member of the Beatles. Musically, the composition reflects Harrison’s embracing of the gospel music genre, following his production of fellow Apple Records artists Billy Preston and Doris Troy.

In his lyrics to “Awaiting on You All”, Harrison espouses a direct relationship with God over adherence to the tenets of organised religion. Influenced by both his association with London-based Hare Krishna devotees, known as the Radha Krishna Temple, and the Vedanta-inspired teachings of Swami Vivekananda, Harrison sings of chanting God’s name as a means to cleanse and liberate oneself from the impurities of the material world. While acknowledging the validity of all faiths, in essence, his song words explicitly criticise the Pope and the perceived materialism of the Catholic Church – a verse that EMI and Capitol Records continue to omit from the album’s lyrics. He also questions the validity of John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s 1969 campaign for world peace, reflecting a divergence of philosophies between Harrison and his former bandmate after their shared interest in Hindu spirituality in 1967–68.

Several commentators have identified “Awaiting on You All” as one of the highlights of All Things Must Pass; author and critic Richard Williams likens it to the Spector-produced “River Deep – Mountain High”, by Ike & Tina Turner.[1] The track is featured in the books 1001 Songs You Must Hear Before You Die by Robert Dimery and 1001 Songs by Toby Creswell. A similarly well-regarded live version, with backing from a large band including Clapton, Ringo Starr, Preston and Jim Keltner, was released on the 1971 album The Concert for Bangladesh and appeared in the 1972 film of the same name. Harrison’s posthumous compilation Early Takes: Volume 1 (2012) includes a demo version of the song, recorded early in the 1970 sessions for All Things Must Pass.

Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)

“Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. Harrison wrote the song as a tribute to Frank Crisp, a nineteenth-century lawyer and the original owner of Friar Park – the Victorian Gothic residence in Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, that Harrison purchased in early 1970. Commentators have likened the song to a cinematic journey through the grand house and the grounds of the estate.

The recording features backing from musicians such as Pete Drake, Billy Preston, Gary Wright, Klaus Voormann and Alan White. It was co-produced by Phil Spector, whose heavy use of reverb adds to the ethereal quality of the song. AllMusic critic Scott Janovitz describes “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)” as offering “a glimpse of the true George Harrison – at once mystical, humorous, solitary, playful, and serious”.[1]

Crisp’s eccentric homilies, which the former Beatle discovered inscribed inside the house and around the property, inspired subsequent compositions of Harrison’s, including “Ding Dong, Ding Dong” and “The Answer’s at the End”. Together with the Friar Park-shot album cover for All Things Must Pass, “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp” established an association between Harrison and his Henley estate that has continued since his death in November 2001. The composition gained further notability in 2009 when it provided the title for Harrison’s posthumous compilation Let It Roll. My Morning Jacket lead singer Jim James and Dhani Harrison are among the artists who have covered the song.

Apple Scruffs (song)

“Apple Scruffs” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. It was written as a tribute to the die-hard Beatles fans known as Apple scruffs, who would wait in certain London locations where the band members were likely to appear, even long after the group’s break-up in April 1970.

The recording has been noted for its Bob Dylan influence, featuring Harrison on acoustic guitar and harmonica, and is recognised as a departure from the big sound synonymous with All Things Must Pass. “Apple Scruffs” was also released as the B-side to “What Is Life”, gaining further popularity through airplay on US radio, and became the preferred side of the single in some countries.

Beware of Darkness (song)

“Beware of Darkness” is a song written by English musician George Harrison and originally released on his 1970 solo album All Things Must Pass. It has also been covered by artists such as Leon Russell, Marianne Faithfull, Spock’s Beard, Concrete Blonde, Matthew Sweet and Susanna Hoffs.[1] Harrison and Russell performed the song at the Concert for Bangladesh in 1971, and Eric Clapton performed it at the Concert for George in 2002.[2][3] The song warns against permitting illusion from getting in the way of one’s true purpose, an admonition that, like the content of “My Sweet Lord”, reflects the influence of the Radha Krishna Temple.

Run of the Mill (George Harrison song)

“Run of the Mill” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. Harrison wrote the song shortly after the Beatles’ troubled Get Back sessions in early 1969, during a period when his growth as a songwriter had inadvertently contributed to the dysfunction within the Beatles’ group dynamic. The lyrics reflect the toll that running their company Apple Corps had taken on relationships within the band, especially between Paul McCartney and the other three Beatles, as well as Harrison’s dismay at John Lennon’s emotional withdrawal from the band. Commentators recognise “Run of the Mill” as one of several Harrison compositions that provide an insight into events behind the Beatles’ break-up, particularly the difficulties surrounding Apple.

The song’s release coincided with a falling out between Harrison and McCartney, which contributed to the latter taking legal action to dissolve the Beatles partnership. The musical arrangement for “Run of the Mill” bears the influence of the Band, with whom Harrison had spent time in Woodstock before starting work on the Get Back project. Co-produced by Phil Spector, the recording features contributions from Gary Wright and former members of Delaney & Bonnie’s Friends band, including Jim Gordon, Jim Price and Bobby Whitlock.

Biographers and reviewers have variously described “Run of the Mill” as an essay on karma, a tale of lost friendship, and a love song to the Beatles. Olivia Harrison has named it among her favourites of all her late husband’s compositions. An alternative version of the song, performed solo by Harrison on acoustic guitar, appears on the 2012 compilation Early Takes: Volume 1.

Let It Down

“Let It Down” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. The recording was co-produced by Phil Spector and employs the latter’s Wall of Sound production technique to lavish effect. Its brash opening and choruses contrast with the ethereal quality of the verses – a loud/soft approach that has been credited with influencing indie bands during the 1980s and 1990s.

Harrison wrote the song in 1968 and offered it to the Beatles in January 1969 for inclusion on what became their Let It Be album (1970), also produced by Spector. It is one of several Harrison compositions that were turned down by the band and subsequently found acclaim on his first solo release following their break-up. Harrison biographers recognise “Let It Down” as an erotic love song, perhaps written to a woman other than Pattie Boyd, his wife at the time. Separated by eighteen months, the song’s conception and recording marked two periods of romantic intrigue involving Harrison, Boyd and their friend Eric Clapton. Author Ian Inglis describes “Let It Down” as “a dynamic and passionate depiction of lust and desire”.[1]

Harrison recorded the song in London, backed by a large cast of musicians, including the whole of Clapton’s newly formed band Derek and the Dominos, Gary Brooker, Gary Wright, Bobby Keys and the group Badfinger. With its dense mix of horns, orchestral strings and heavy rock instrumentation, commentators identify “Let It Down” as an extreme example of Spector’s influence on All Things Must Pass, an influence that also provided a disruptive element during the album’s creation. An acoustic version of “Let It Down”, also taped in 1970 but with overdubs recorded in 2000, appeared as a bonus track on the 30th anniversary edition of All Things Must Pass.

Behind That Locked Door

“Behind That Locked Door” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. Harrison wrote the song in August 1969 as a message of encouragement to Bob Dylan, who was making a highly publicised comeback to the concert stage, accompanied by the Band, with a headlining performance at the Isle of Wight Festival. “Behind That Locked Door” is a rare Harrison composition in the country music genre and the second song dealing with the friendship between himself and Dylan, after their 1968 collaboration “I’d Have You Anytime”. Its lyrics address Dylan’s elusive nature, and reflect the high regard in which Harrison held the American singer’s work. The same reluctance on Dylan’s part to re-engage with a concert audience led to him retreating again from live performance until August 1971, when he responded to Harrison’s request to play at the Concert for Bangladesh.

Harrison recorded “Behind That Locked Door” in London early in the summer of 1970, shortly after taking part in a session for Dylan’s New Morning album in New York. Co-produced by Phil Spector, the recording features a prominent contribution from Nashville pedal steel virtuoso Pete Drake, and twin keyboard parts from Gary Wright and Billy Preston in the tradition of the Band, whose sound influenced Harrison’s arrangement. With its understated performance, the track is a comparatively rare departure from the big production commonly associated with All Things Must Pass. On release, Alan Smith of the NME described the song as “a tremendous piece of country-meets-Hawaii” and recommended that it be sent to country singer Slim Whitman “without further delay”.[1]

An alternate take of “Behind That Locked Door” appears on the 2012 Harrison compilation Early Takes: Volume 1. Olivia Newton-John, Jim James, the Felice Brothers and Norah Jones are among the artists who have covered the song.

Piggies

“Piggies” is a song by the English rock group the Beatles from their 1968 album The Beatles (also known as “the White Album”). Written by George Harrison as a social commentary, the song serves as an Orwellian satire on greed and consumerism. Among several elements it incorporates from classical music, the track features harpsichord and orchestral strings in the baroque pop style, which are contrasted by Harrison’s acerbic lyrics and the sound of grunting pigs. Although credited to George Martin, the recording was largely produced by Chris Thomas, who also contributed the harpsichord part.

In the context of the turbulent political climate of 1968, “Piggies” was adopted by the counterculture as an anti-establishment theme song. It was also among the tracks on The Beatles that cult leader Charles Manson used as the foundation for his Helter Skelter theory of an American race-related countercultural revolution. Inspired especially by the line “What they need’s a damn good whacking”, Manson’s followers left clues relating to the lyrics at the scenes of the Tate–LaBianca murders in August 1969.

Since its release in November 1968, “Piggies” has received mixed responses from music critics. While some reviewers admire its musical qualities and recognise sardonic humour in the lyrics, others consider the song to be mean-spirited and lacking in subtlety. Harrison’s demo of the song, recorded at his home in Surrey, was included on the Beatles’ 1996 compilation Anthology 3. A live version by Harrison, reinstating a verse that was omitted from the studio recording, appears on his 1992 album Live in Japan.

While My Guitar Gently Weeps

“While My Guitar Gently Weeps” is a song by the English rock band the Beatles from their 1968 double album The Beatles (also known as “the White Album”). It was written by George Harrison, partly as an exercise in randomness after he consulted the Chinese I Ching. The song also serves as a comment on the disharmony within the Beatles at the time. The recording includes a lead guitar part played by Eric Clapton, although he was not formally credited for his contribution.[5][6]

“While My Guitar Gently Weeps” ranks 136th on Rolling Stone’s “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”, seventh on the magazine’s list of the “100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time”, and tenth on its list of “The Beatles 100 Greatest Songs”.[7][8][9][10] Guitar World magazine’s February 2012 online poll voted “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” the best of George Harrison’s Beatles-era songs.[11] Clapton’s performance ranked 42nd in Guitar World’s October 2008 list of the “100 Greatest Guitar Solos”.[12]

The Inner Light (song)

“The Inner Light” is a song by the English rock group the Beatles, written by George Harrison. It was released on a non-album single in March 1968, as the B-side to “Lady Madonna”. The song was the first Harrison composition to be featured on a Beatles single and reflects the band’s embrace of Transcendental Meditation and his continued interest in Indian classical music. It is the last of three Indian-style tracks he wrote for the Beatles, after “Love You To” and “Within You Without You”. The lyrics are a rendering of a poem from the Taoist Tao Te Ching, which Harrison set to music on the recommendation of Juan Mascaró, a Sanskrit scholar who had translated the passage in his 1958 book Lamps of Fire. The song became a comparative rarity among the Beatles’ recordings in the decade following its release; it has subsequently appeared on compilation albums such as Rarities, Past Masters, Volume Two and Mono Masters.

Harrison recorded the instrumental track for “The Inner Light” in India in January 1968, during the sessions for his Wonderwall Music soundtrack album. The only Beatles studio recording to be made outside Europe, the song introduced instruments such as sarod, shehnai and pakhavaj to the band’s sound and features contributions from Indian classical musicians including Aashish Khan, Hanuman Jadev and Hariprasad Chaurasia. Aside from Harrison’s lead vocal, recorded in London, the Beatles’ only contribution came in the form of group backing vocals at the end of the song.

Among music critics, “The Inner Light” has received praise for its melodic qualities and for its evocation of the meditation experience. Jeff Lynne and Anoushka Shankar performed the song at the Concert for George tribute in November 2002, a year after Harrison’s death. An alternative take of the 1968 instrumental track was released in 2014 on the remastered Wonderwall Music CD. Screenwriter Morgan Gendel named a 1992 episode of the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation as an homage to the song.

Sour Milk Sea

“Sour Milk Sea” is a song by the English rock singer Jackie Lomax that was released as his debut single on the Beatles’ Apple record label in August 1968. It was written by George Harrison during the Beatles’ stay in Rishikesh, India, and given to Lomax to help launch Apple Records. The song’s recording was the first of many extracurricular musical projects undertaken by Harrison, who produced the track, and a rarity among non-Beatles songs since it features contributions from three members of the band. Along with Harrison, Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney, the musicians on the track were Eric Clapton and session pianist Nicky Hopkins.

Harrison wrote “Sour Milk Sea” to promote Transcendental Meditation, which the Beatles had been studying in Rishikesh with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. The group recorded a demo of the song while considering material for their 1968 double album, The Beatles. On release, Lomax’s single was overshadowed in Apple’s “Our First Four” promotional campaign by the Beatles’ “Hey Jude” and Mary Hopkin’s “Those Were the Days”; it enjoyed only minor success internationally, becoming a top 30 hit in Canada. Together with its B-side, the Lomax-written “The Eagle Laughs at You”, the song was included on the singer’s only Apple album, Is This What You Want?, released in March 1969.

“Sour Milk Sea” has received praise from many music critics. Writing for Mojo shortly after Lomax’s death in 2013, Danny Eccleston described it as “a brilliantly excitable recording”, although he attributed the single’s lack of commercial success to an “accusatory tone” in Harrison’s lyrics.[1] The track also appears on the 2010 multi-artist compilation Come and Get It: The Best of Apple Records.

Love You To

“Love You To” is a song by the English rock group the Beatles from their 1966 album Revolver. The song was written and sung by George Harrison and features Indian instrumentation such as sitar and tabla. Following Harrison’s introduction of the sitar on “Norwegian Wood” in 1965, it was the first Beatles song to fully reflect the influence of Indian classical music. The recording was made with minimal participation from Harrison’s bandmates; instead, he created the track with tabla player Anil Bhagwat and other Indian musicians from the Asian Music Circle in London.

The composition adheres to the pitches of the Indian equivalent of Dorian mode and emulates the khyal vocal tradition of Hindustani classical music. For musical inspiration, Harrison drew from the work of master sitarist Ravi Shankar, who became his sitar tutor shortly after the recording was completed. In its lyrical themes, “Love You To” is partly a love song to Harrison’s wife, Pattie Boyd, while also incorporating philosophical concepts inspired by his experimentation with the hallucinogenic drug LSD. In the context of its release, the song served as one of the first examples of the Beatles expressing an ideology aligned with that of the emerging counterculture.

“Love You To” has been hailed by musicologists and critics as groundbreaking in its presentation of a non-Western musical form to rock audiences, particularly with regard to authenticity and avoidance of parody. Author Jonathan Gould describes the song’s slow sitar introduction as “one of the most brazenly exotic acts of stylistic experimentation ever heard on a popular LP”.[2] Ronnie Montrose, Bongwater, Jim James and Cornershop are among the artists who have covered “Love You To”.

I Want to Tell You

“I Want to Tell You” is a song by the English rock group the Beatles from their 1966 album Revolver. It was written and sung by George Harrison, the band’s lead guitarist. After “Taxman” and “Love You To”, it was the third Harrison composition recorded for Revolver, marking the first time that he was allocated more than two songs on a Beatles album.

When writing the song, Harrison drew inspiration from his experimentation with the hallucinogenic drug LSD. The lyrics address what he later termed “the avalanche of thoughts that are so hard to write down or say or transmit”.[1] Harrison’s stuttering guitar riff on the track, together with the dissonance he employs in the melody, attempt to reflect the difficulties of achieving genuine communication. The recording marked the first time that Paul McCartney played his bass guitar part after the band had completed the rhythm track for a song, a technique that became common on the Beatles’ subsequent recordings.

Harrison performed “I Want to Tell You” as the opening song throughout his 1991 Japanese tour with Eric Clapton. A version recorded during that tour appears on his Live in Japan album. At the Concert for George tribute in November 2002, a year after Harrison’s death, the song was used to open the Western portion of the event, when it was performed by Jeff Lynne. Ted Nugent, the Smithereens, Thea Gilmore and the Melvins are among the other artists who have covered the track.

Think for Yourself

“Think for Yourself” is a song by English rock band The Beatles, and written by George Harrison who sings and plays guitar on the track. First appearing on their 1965 album Rubber Soul, it is a warning against listening to lies,[1] and the first of Harrison’s songs not to be a love song. In a departure from all precedent at the time, the song has two bass lines, a normal one and one created by Paul McCartney’s then-unique application of a fuzzbox to his bass.[2] A brief repeated clip of the song was featured in The Beatles 1968 animated movie Yellow Submarine and was reissued for the 1999 Yellow Submarine Songtrack album.

You Like Me Too Much

“You Like Me Too Much” is a song by the Beatles written by George Harrison. It was released in 1965 on the Help! album in the United Kingdom and on Beatles VI in the United States.[2]

The song is in the key of G Major and in 4/4 time.[2] There is an introduction using piano and electric piano, with Paul McCartney and George Martin playing two different piano parts on separate ends of the same Steinway grand piano. The Steinway appears only in the song’s intro and was overdubbed separately, as were McCartney’s bass and Harrison’s vocal overdubs. The electric piano is a Hohner Pianet, played by John Lennon, and you can hear the instrument’s tremolo being switched off after the intro.

The piano introduction was later used by Bob Dylan for his song “Temporary Like Achilles”. The quick transition from G chord to a flat-III (Bflat) is unusual, especially as its F-natural note is melodically sustained against the following D-Major chord (with its concomitant F#) creating “the most bluesy moment of the entire song.”[2] The verse opens with three repetitions of a simple four note motif (“Though you’ve gone away this morning, you’ll be back again tonight”) during which the chords mirror the lyrics in shifting from ii (Am chord) on “gone away” to IV (C chord) on “back again” to the tonic (G chord) on “tonight.”[3]

I Need You (Beatles song)

“I Need You” is a song by the Beatles and appears on the album Help!. It is the second George Harrison song the band released[2] after two albums without any songwriting contribution from Harrison. The song was performed in their second film, Help! and is the second video produced showing George Harrison singing lead vocal on a song (after “I’m Happy Just To Dance With You” from A Hard Day’s Night).

The song was recorded on 15 and 16 February 1965.[3] This was the first recording session for the group in 1965 and included two other songs, Ticket to Ride and Another Girl, both of which were also included on the Help! album. The song is often considered to address Harrison’s relationship with Pattie Boyd, whom he had met in March 1964 while filming A Hard Day’s Night[2] (they married in January 1966).[4]

I’m Happy Just to Dance with You

“I’m Happy Just to Dance with You” is a song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney[2] and recorded by the Beatles for the film soundtrack to A Hard Day’s Night. Lead vocals are by George Harrison, whose performance in the film marked the first commercial music video segment with Harrison singing lead.

It was written specifically for George Harrison to sing at a time when he lacked the confidence to compose his own material. Years later, McCartney described it as a “formula song”,[2] and Lennon said, “I would never have sung it myself.”[3]

Featuring a hectic Bo Diddley style rhythm guitar in juxtaposition with Harrison’s placid vocal, its composers give it an unexpected choice of chord at the crux of its chorus augmenting the B7th on “I’m happy just to dance with you”. The song is also distinctive in that it begins not with a verse or chorus but with the last four bars of the bridge.[4]

Cry for a Shadow

“Cry for a Shadow” is an instrumental rock piece recorded by the Beatles on 22 June 1961. They recorded the song at Friedrich-Ebert-Halle within the gymnasium, Hamburg-Harburg, Germany while they were performing as Tony Sheridan’s backup band for a few tracks, under the moniker the Beat Brothers. It was written by George Harrison with John Lennon, as a parody of the Shadows style.[1] (The Shadows, who backed Cliff Richard, were the biggest British instrumental rock & roll group at the time of the recording.) It imitates the lead guitar with typical Hank Marvin licks, the melodic bass fills, and even has an imitation during the second middle eight of the famous Jet Harris yell. It is the only Beatles track to be credited to Lennon and Harrison alone.

It was intended to be released as the B-side of “Why”, another Sheridan song with the Beatles, but the record company chose to release another song instead. In early 1964, as the Beatles were gaining popularity, the record company Polydor decided to release it, with “Why” changed to the b-side.[2] “Cry for a Shadow”‘s original title was “Beatle Bop”.[3]

“Cry for a Shadow” is one of only two officially released Beatles singles to feature Pete Best on drums. The other is “Ain’t She Sweet,” although it’s alleged that studio drummer Bernard Purdie “sweetened” the drum parts on this recording for American release.

It is also featured on The Beatles’ First[4] and as part of the Anthology 1 compilation in 1995.[1]

Don’t Bother Me

“Don’t Bother Me” is the first song written by George Harrison to appear on an album by English rock group the Beatles. The upbeat rock and roll song originally appeared on the group’s With the Beatles album in the United Kingdom, released in 1963, and on their Meet the Beatles! album in the United States, released in 1964.

Harrison wrote the song while ill in bed at a hotel room in Bournemouth, England, where the Beatles were playing some shows during the summer of 1963.[1] He considered it an exercise in whether he could write a song, later saying, “at least it showed me that all I needed to do was keep on writing, and then maybe eventually I would write something good.”[2] Harrison received a writing credit for two earlier songs, “In Spite of All the Danger” (McCartney/Harrison) and “Cry for a Shadow” (Harrison/Lennon). Both were recorded by The Beatles but neither was released officially by the band until 1995’s Anthology 1 compilation.[3] Because the former was largely a McCartney composition (Harrison received a credit simply for playing the guitar solo) and the latter was an instrumental pastiche of the Shadows, “Don’t Bother Me” is considered Harrison’s first song by most (including the composer himself). Harrison did not think highly of the song, not mentioning it in an otherwise comprehensive overview of his Beatles compositions in his autobiography I Me Mine. The Beatles never performed it live or at any of their BBC sessions.
After “Don’t Bother Me”, it was not until 1965’s Help! album that any more Harrison-penned songs (“I Need You” and “You Like Me Too Much”) would appear on record. “You Know What to Do” was recorded in 1964, but was not released at the time.

Do You Want to Know a Secret

“Do You Want to Know a Secret?” is a song by English rock group the Beatles from the 1963 album Please Please Me, sung by George Harrison. In the United States, it was the first top ten song to feature Harrison as a lead singer, reaching No. 2 on the Billboard chart in 1964 as a single released by Vee-Jay, VJ 587.

“Do You Want to Know a Secret?”, written in autumn 1962, was primarily composed by John Lennon but credited to Lennon–McCartney.[1]The song was inspired by “I’m Wishing”,[2] a tune from Walt Disney’s 1937 animated film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs which Lennon’s mother, Julia Lennon, would sing to him as a child. The first two lines of the song in Disney’s movie (“Want to know a secret? Promise not to tell?”) come right after the opening lyrics (“You’ll never know how much I really love you… You’ll never know how much I really care…”).[3][4] McCartney has said it was a “50–50 collaboration written to order”, i.e., for Harrison to sing,[5] but Lennon, who always claimed the song as his own, explained in a 1980 interview that he had realized as soon as he had finished writing the song that it best suited Harrison.[6]

Taxman

“Taxman” is a song written by George Harrison and released as the opening track on the Beatles’ 1966 album Revolver. Its lyrics attack the high levels of progressive tax taken by the British Labour government of Harold Wilson.[4][5]

Harrison said, “‘Taxman’ was when I first realised that even though we had started earning money, we were actually giving most of it away in taxes. It was and still is typical.”[6] As their earnings placed them in the top tax bracket in the United Kingdom, the Beatles were liable to a 95% supertax introduced by Harold Wilson’s Labour government (hence the lyrics “There’s one for you, nineteen for me”).[7] In a 1984 interview with Playboy magazine, Paul McCartney explained: “George wrote that and I played guitar on it. He wrote it in anger at finding out what the taxman did. He had never known before then what he’ll do with your money.”

If I Needed Someone

“If I Needed Someone” is a song written by George Harrison. Versions by the Beatles and by the Hollies appeared simultaneously, both being released in the United Kingdom on 3 December 1965. The Hollies version appeared on a single. Most of the Hollies’ previous singles had been big top ten hits. When their version of “If I Needed Someone” only reached the lower half of the top 20 in the UK, they were quite critical and said they had made a mistake recording it.[citation needed] The Beatles’ recording of the song first appeared in the UK on the 1965 album Rubber Soul and was later included in the 1966 North American release, Yesterday and Today.

Roll Over Beethoven

“Roll Over Beethoven” is a 1956 hit single by Chuck Berry, originally released on Chess Records, with “Drifting Heart” as the B-side. The lyrics of the song mention rock and roll and the desire for rhythm and blues to replace classical music. The title of the song is an imperative directed at the composer Ludwig van Beethoven to roll over in his grave in reaction to the new genre of music that Berry was promoting. The song has been covered by many other artists. Rolling Stone magazine ranked it number 97 on its list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.[2]

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