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Wasted Years

“Wasted Years” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is the band’s fourteenth single released and the first from their sixth studio album, Somewhere in Time (1986). It is the only song on the album that features no synthesizers. Released in 1986, it was the first single solely written by guitarist Adrian Smith, who also sings backing vocals. It reached number 18 in the UK Singles Charts.

Wildest Dreams (Iron Maiden song)

“Wildest Dreams” is a single from Iron Maiden’s 13th studio album, Dance of Death, released in 2003. It was written by guitarist Adrian Smith and bassist Steve Harris.

The band began performing the song in concert before the album was released. The single also includes an improvisational jam from the Dance of Death sessions. The song was again played on The Final Frontier World Tour.

The music video is a computer animated short, where the band members drive around a desolate planet and into the mouth of Eddie (as depicted on the CD single cover).[2]

The guitar solo in “Wildest Dreams” is played by Adrian Smith.

It is also unique in the release of a DVD single[3] at the same time as the CD single,[4] the first time this was done by the band.

The single was released as a 7″ Green Vinyl Limited Edition[5] with two tracks; A CD maxi-single with three tracks[6] on it; Then for the first time a DVD version of the title track as a single[7] which also had a behind the scenes.

The Wicker Man (song)

“The Wicker Man” is a song by Iron Maiden, released as the first single from their album Brave New World in April 2000. It was co-written by Adrian Smith, Bruce Dickinson and Steve Harris. It was co-produced by Kevin Shirley and Harris. The title is inspired by the British cult film of the same name. The song should not be confused with “Wicker Man” from Dickinson’s solo career, the lyrics of which are more closely themed around the film. The latter song can be found on the 2 disc edition of The Best of Bruce Dickinson.

Wasting Love

“Wasting Love” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is the third single from their ninth studio album, Fear of the Dark, released in 1992.

The song was a collaboration of singer Bruce Dickinson, and guitarist Janick Gers. The lyrics deal with the subject of loneliness brought on by sex outside the context of love.

The single was only officially released in the Netherlands, although different one-track promotional CDs exist, one for U.S. radio stations and another for Spain, which had the only vinyl version of the single. [1]
The single cover is the third Iron Maiden single not to feature the band’s iconic mascot Eddie on the front cover (the previous examples being “Running Free (live)” and “From Here to Eternity”). The cover photo alludes to the music video, which portrays a man tattooing the names of women all over his body. The song’s video was directed by Samuel Bayer.

The guitar solo in “Wasting Love” is played by Janick Gers.

Virus (Iron Maiden song)

“Virus” is a single from Iron Maiden, released in 1996. It is the first single since 1980’s “Women in Uniform” that does not appear on any official Iron Maiden studio album. It was, however, featured as a brand new track on the band’s first ever career retrospective — 1996’s double-disc Best of the Beast. It is the only Iron Maiden song to be credited to both of the band’s guitarists. It has never been performed live by Iron Maiden, but Blaze Bayley performed it several times in his solo career. Lyrically, the song warns of rising business corruption in an increasingly Internet-dependent world.

Twilight Zone (Iron Maiden song)

“Twilight Zone” was the fourth single by Iron Maiden, released on 2 March 1981 and is the lead single to the 1981 LP Killers. The song did not appear in the original album in February, but was included in the U.S. release in June and the international 1998 remaster. At the time of its release, it was the band’s second-most successful single, peaking at No. 31 in the UK Singles Chart.[1] It is the band’s first single to feature guitarist Adrian Smith. In the 1990 box set, The First Ten Years, it is on the same CD and 12″ vinyl as the previous single, “Women in Uniform”.

The Trooper

“The Trooper” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It was released as the second single on 20 June 1983 from the band’s fourth studio album, Piece of Mind (1983). It was one of only a few songs to get much radio airplay in the US, thus peaking at No. 28 on the US Mainstream Rock charts.[1] It also achieved success in the UK, peaking at No. 12 in the UK Singles Charts as well as gaining a much better reception than the band’s previous single, “Flight of Icarus”.[2]
A live version of the song, from Death on the Road, was issued in 2005.

Stranger in a Strange Land (Iron Maiden song)

“Stranger in a Strange Land” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released as the second single from their sixth studio album, Somewhere in Time (1986). The song is unrelated to Robert A. Heinlein’s novel by the same name.[1]

The lyrics are about an Arctic explorer who dies and is frozen in the ice. After a hundred years his body is found preserved by other people exploring there.[2] Adrian Smith was inspired to write about this song after talking to an explorer who had a similar experience of discovering a frozen body.

The guitar solo in “Stranger in a Strange Land” is played by Adrian Smith. The song is one of only four Iron Maiden songs to fade out, the others being “The Prophecy” from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, “Women in Uniform”, a single included on some pressings of Killers, and “Kill Me Ce Soir”, a 1990 B-side. The lyrics “brave new world” were also present in Iron Maiden’s 2000 studio release, Brave New World.

Speed of Light (Iron Maiden song)

“Speed of Light” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden from their sixteenth studio album, The Book of Souls. The song was released as a music video on 14 August 2015 and was also made available as a digital download and issued as a single-track CD exclusive to Best Buy in the US.[1][2][3]

The song’s music video was directed and produced by Llexi Leon, creator of the comic book series Eternal Descent, as well as the virtual band of the same name.[1] The video is an “‘homage’ to four decades of video gaming”,[4] centring on the band’s mascot, Eddie, as he travels “through the combined 35-year history of video games”.[3] The visual effects were provided by The Brewery, who had previously worked on the films Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll (2010) and Spike Island (2012), as well as the 2014 TV series Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond.[5]

Satellite 15… The Final Frontier

“Satellite 15… The Final Frontier” is the first track from British heavy metal band Iron Maiden’s album The Final Frontier. A short teaser for the song’s music video was released on 9 July 2010 and an announcement of the full video’s release was made on 13 July.[1]

The music video, presenting a 4-minute edit of the song (“The Final Frontier”), shows an astronaut (Gudmundur Thorvaldsson)[2] on a quest to destroy an unnamed planet. He is pursued and attacked by an alien incarnation of Eddie, the band’s mascot, before apparently killing him. Back on the spaceship, Eddie has sneaked aboard and ejects the astronaut into space, shortly before himself destroying the planet using a pyramidal relic (that the astronaut himself had just recovered from the planet) and the key featured on the album cover.

The video was created in eight weeks from a mixture of live action, CGI, and 3D animation by Darkside Animation Films. Written by Dirk Maggs, the live-action sequences were directed by Nick Scott Studios and shot in Rendlesham Forest.[3]

The song’s guitar solo, lasting from about 6:32 to 7:16, is a trade-off divided into two parts; the first is played by Adrian Smith (6:32-7:01), while the second is played by Dave Murray (7:01-7:16).

Sanctuary (Iron Maiden song)

“Sanctuary” is the second single released by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The single was released on 23 May 1980. Although originally issued as a non-album single, the song was added to the later US release of their debut studio record, Iron Maiden (1980). When the album was re-released in 1998, the song was added in all territories. In 1990, the 12″ version was reissued on CD and 12″ vinyl in The First Ten Years box set, in which it was combined with their first single, “Running Free”.

Running Free

“Running Free” is the debut single by Iron Maiden, released on 8 February 1980 on the 7″ 45 rpm vinyl record format. It was written by Steve Harris and Paul Di’Anno. The song appears as the third track on the band’s debut album Iron Maiden (and the fourth track on its 1998 re-release). In 1985, a live version of the song was released as the first single from Live After Death (the band’s twelfth single). In 1990, the original single was reissued on CD and 12″ vinyl as part of The First Ten Years box, in which it was combined with the band’s next single, “Sanctuary”. The 1985 live single was also released as part of this box set, combined with 1985’s “Run to the Hills”.

Run to the Hills

“Run to the Hills” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It was released as their sixth single and the first from the band’s third studio album, The Number of the Beast (1982). Credited solely to the band’s bassist, Steve Harris, although significant contributions were made by lead vocalist Bruce Dickinson, it remains one of their most popular songs, with VH1 ranking it No. 27 on their list of the 40 Greatest Metal Songs[1] and No. 14 on their list of the Greatest Hard Rock Songs.[2]

A live version of the song, from Live After Death, was released in 1985 and the original single was reissued in 2002, with all income donated to former drummer Clive Burr’s MS Trust Fund. In 1990, as part of The First Ten Years box set, both the original and the 1985 live single were reissued on CD and 12″ vinyl, combined with “The Number of the Beast” and “Running Free (live)” respectively.

The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg

“The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg” is a song by Iron Maiden from their 14th studio album, A Matter of Life and Death. The song is the leading single from the album, released on 14 August 2006.

The CD single comes with a B-side of “Hallowed Be Thy Name” from the BBC Radio 1 Legends Session. Due to the overall length of the two songs, the single was not eligible for chart inclusion in the UK. The single was also released on 10″ clear vinyl single, which includes BBC Sessions versions of “The Trooper” and “Run to the Hills” on the B-side.[2]

For the EU pressing of the 10″ vinyl the sleeve and labels state that it should be played at 33.3 RPM. This is actually incorrect and the correct playing speed is 45 RPM. The USA issue plays correctly at 33.3 RPM.

A promotional version of the single was released on 14 August 2006, featuring the full version and a shorter version called “edited version” in the US promo CD and “rock club mix” in the UK promo CD (both versions are identical). The single was not allowed to have a place in the UK charts because the overall music time on the CD exceeded the time limit for it to be classed as a single.[3]

On 17 July 2006, a music video for the song was uploaded on the band’s official website. It had initially been released only for paying fan club members, but it was leaked within minutes and viewed by many fans who posted the link on various Iron Maiden discussion forums. The video displays them performing in the studio along with classic photos and clips of the band over their lengthy career.

The guitar solo in “The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg” is played by Dave Murray.

Rainmaker (Iron Maiden song)

“Rainmaker” is the 37th single released by Iron Maiden. It is the second single from their 13th studio album Dance of Death.

The song was largely written by long-time guitarist Dave Murray. The lyrics were inspired by vocalist Bruce Dickinson’s comment that the intro riff made him think of raindrops. The song has no connection with the 1995 novel written by John Grisham of the same name.
The guitar solo in “Rainmaker” is played by Dave Murray.
The cover is a still taken from the music video directed by Howard Greenhalgh. This single also contains a double-sided poster.
“More Tea Vicar” is a recording of a jam session (similar to “Pass the Jam”) with Bruce Dickinson trying his hand at rapping, which is clearly a parody of the genre.

Purgatory (song)

“Purgatory” is Iron Maiden’s fifth single, released on 15 June 1981, and would be their last with singer Paul Di’Anno. It is the only single from Killers as the preceding release, “Twilight Zone”, was not included on the album’s original pressing. The single was reissued in 1990, on the same CD and 12″ vinyl as the EP Maiden Japan, in the First Ten Years box set.

According to drummer Nicko McBrain, the track is a remake of one of the band’s earlier songs, entitled “Floating”, of which “Purgatory” is a faster re-arrangement.[1] It was the group’s least successful single as it failed to break into the Top 50 in the UK charts, although the group’s manager, Rod Smallwood, states that this was because “it wasn’t really a single, it was just lifted off the album which the fans already had.”[2]

Most notably, the single’s original cover artwork was withdrawn for use on the band’s next studio album, The Number of the Beast.[2] Smallwood recalls that, on being presented with the original cover, “we said, ‘No, that’s much too good,’ so we kept it for the album. We had the artwork months before we had the music.”[3] This meant that the band’s artist, Derek Riggs, had to come up with a replacement, this time illustrating the Devil’s face rotting away to reveal the band’s mascot, Eddie’s, face underneath.[4]

Out of the Silent Planet (song)

“Out of the Silent Planet” is a single from the Iron Maiden album Brave New World, released in 2000.

The single features two live tracks from the 1999 Ed Hunter tour, which featured the band reunited with guitarist Adrian Smith and vocalist Bruce Dickinson, as well as the promotional video for “Out of the Silent Planet.” Cover art was by Mark Wilkinson. According to interviews with band members, the song was primarily influenced by the science fiction movie Forbidden Planet. (In addition, the name “Out Of The Silent Planet” is a reference to the 1938 C.S. Lewis science fiction novel by the same title.)

It’s a peculiarity in that despite being one of only 2 singles from the album, this was not played on the majority of the accompanying world tour–only in a few encores in South America.

The guitar solo in the song is played by Janick Gers.

The music video is a recording of the band’s European leg of their Brave New World Tour.

The regular single [1] and the limited edition numbered single [2] were both the same, which was unusual for Iron Maiden releases. The 12″ Picture Disc LP had the limited edition cover with Eddie at the podium on side A and the reporters on side B. [3] All three versions had the same tracks, also unusual for multiple Iron Maiden singles of the same title.

The Number of the Beast (song)

“The Number of the Beast” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is Iron Maiden’s seventh single release, and the second single from their 1982 studio album of the same name. It was reissued in 2005 and also prior to that in 1990 in The First Ten Years box set on CD and 12″ vinyl, in which it was combined the previous single, “Run to the Hills”.

Upon release in 1982, the song caused controversy in the United States where its religious subject matter caused outrage amongst religious groups. In spite of this, it remains one of the band’s more popular songs, reaching No. 18 in the UK singles charts, and has been performed on almost all of their concert tours. Additionally, the song has been covered numerous times and has appeared in several video games and films.

Man on the Edge

“Man on the Edge” is a single from the Iron Maiden album The X Factor released in 1995. The song is based on the film Falling Down, starring Michael Douglas. It was the first single the band released with Blaze Bayley on vocals.

In addition to an interview with Bayley and another track from The X Factor, the single features three originals that did not make the album’s final cut. It is one of two Blaze Bayley era songs to make it onto the Edward the Great compilation, along with “Futureal”, as well as one of three to make it onto Best of the Beast along with “Sign of the Cross” and “Virus”.

Iron Maiden frequently played this song during the Ed Hunter tour in 1999, making it one of 5 Bayley era songs to survive in concerts after his departure (The others being “Lord of the Flies”, “Sign of the Cross”, “Futureal”, and “The Clansman”).

A live version of this song from 1999 is featured on the 2000 single release of “The Wicker Man” and on the compilation From Fear to Eternity from 2011, with Bruce Dickinson on vocals.

There were three videos made for this song. One is filmed on location at Masada, Israel, the second is a more cinematic video of the band performing as a man throws himself off a building, and the third is a ‘sneak-peek’ promo video consisting only of clips of ‘pratfalls’ from black and white silent movies was used for promotional purposes prior to release. This third version appears as an ‘Easter Egg’ on the ‘Visions of the Beast’ DVD.

The song was featured in the video game Carmageddon 2.

On the cover of CD 1 Eddie’s brain has been cut in half, though on CD 2 he still has his brain attached. The 12″ Picture Disc was the same as CD 1 though because it moved within the sleeve it could look very different, very much like an “X” in the right position.

Lord of the Flies (song)

“Lord of the Flies” is an Iron Maiden single and second track on their 1995 album The X Factor. The song is based on the book and film of the same name.[3]

The single was only released outside of the UK. Additional tracks on the single include covers from UFO and The Who.

Iron Maiden frequently performed this song live during their Dance of Death tour from 2003–2004,[4] making it one of only 5 Bayley era songs to survive in concerts after his departure (the others being “Man on the Edge”, “Sign of the Cross”, “Futureal”, and “The Clansman”), and the last Bayley-era song that has made Iron Maiden setlists to date. One such performance of this song is included on Iron Maiden’s 2005 live album “Death on the Road”.[5]

The guitar solo in “Lord of the Flies” is played by Janick Gers.

Infinite Dreams

“Infinite Dreams” is a live single released in 1989 by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is the only single to be released in sync with a home video; 1989’s Maiden England. The performance was recorded in Birmingham, England in 1988 towards the end of the massive world tour to support the album where the song originally appeared, being Seventh Son of a Seventh Son. It is the final single to feature Adrian Smith for an entire decade.

Holy Smoke (song)

“Holy Smoke” is a song by English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is the first single release to feature guitarist Janick Gers, who joined the band in mid-1990. It was released just weeks before the album, No Prayer for the Dying, and climbed to number three on the UK Singles Chart.

The song deals with the many televangelist scandals that took place in the United States in the late 1980s, including mentions of “Jimmy the Reptile” (a reference to Jimmy Swaggart), “The TV Queen” (a possible reference to Tammy Faye Bakker), Noah, and “plenty of bad preachers for the Devil to stoke.” Contrary to what some believe, however, this song is not aimed at the Christian religion itself, but rather the people that abuse it to make gains for themselves. This is one of the very few Iron Maiden songs with profanity in the lyrics (for example, “Flies around shit/bees around honey” and “I’ve lived in filth/I’ve lived in sin/and I still smell cleaner than the shit you’re in”), which is replaced by gunshot sounds in censored versions.

Hallowed Be Thy Name

“Hallowed Be Thy Name” is a song written by Steve Harris for the 1982 Iron Maiden album The Number of The Beast. It has been acclaimed as one of the greatest heavy metal songs of all time.

The 1993 live single is taken from the 1993 album A Real Dead One. The song was recorded at Moscow’s Olympic Arena on 4 June 1993 during the Real Live Tour.[1] Recordings from the same tour and its predecessor, 1992’s Fear of the Dark Tour, made up the single’s B-sides.[1][2] It is the band’s last single to feature vocalist Bruce Dickinson until 2000’s “The Wicker Man”.

From Here to Eternity (Iron Maiden song)

“From Here to Eternity” is a song by English heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released as the second single from their album Fear of the Dark, released in 1992.[1]

The song is the fourth and most recent song in the ongoing saga of “Charlotte the Harlot” (other songs include “Charlotte the Harlot,” “22 Acacia Avenue,” and “Hooks in You”, although the status of the latter song is a point of debate among fans since it does not actually mention “Charlotte”, just “the keys to a view at number 22”). The songs tells the tale of Charlotte going on a fateful motorcycle ride with the Devil.

This is the first studio single to not feature Eddie in the artwork – second overall, after the live version of “Running Free” – using a picture of the song’s music video instead. The cover of the 7″ Etched Disc is the cover most people associate with the single, though the 12″ was a very different picture from the clip. The CD Maxi used the 7″ etched cover, but a different shot again from the clip is on the Netherlands release of the CD.[2]

The single was released in several formats: 7″ etched disc with the tracks on one side and an image etched into the other;[3] 7″ cut to shape picture disc;[4] 12″ with fold-out sleeve;[5] and a cd-single.[6]

It charted and peaked at #21 on the UK Singles Chart.

Flight of Icarus

“Flight of Icarus” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It was released as their eighth single and the first from their fourth studio album, Piece of Mind (1983). It was the band’s first single to be released in the United States, becoming one of their few songs to gain substantial airplay,[1] peaking at No. 8 on the Billboard Top Album Tracks chart – the highest position of any Iron Maiden single in the US.[2] It was also a success in the UK, peaking at No. 11 on the UK Singles Chart. It is also the band’s first release to feature Nicko McBrain, who replaced Clive Burr on drums in 1982.

Fear of the Dark (song)

“Fear of the Dark” is a song by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. Written by Steve Harris, the band’s bass player and primary songwriter, it serves as the title track to Iron Maiden’s 1992 album Fear of the Dark.

The single “Fear of the Dark (live)” is the 26th single released by the band. This live version of the song (as well as the live versions of “Bring Your Daughter… to the Slaughter”, “Be Quick or Be Dead”, and “Tailgunner”) are taken from the live album A Real Live One. The single reached number 8 in the UK charts. The live version of “Hooks in You” was recorded at the Wembley Arena, London, UK on 17 December 1990. The initial pressing of the 7″ cut-to-shape vinyl picture disc listed Hooks In You (live) as the B-side but actually played Tailgunner (live). This mis-press was quickly corrected by EMI on future pressings.

The song has been covered by German a cappella metal band van Canto on their album Hero, as well as the Italian metal band Graveworm on their 2001 album Scourge of Malice, by the also Italian death metal band Infernal Poetry on their 2005 album Beholding the Unpure and by the Finnish band Sturm und Drang as the bonus track on their 2008 album Rock ‘n Roll Children. The song was covered by Fightstar for Kerrang! magazine’s Maiden Heaven tribute album.[1]

The Flight 666 version of the song was released as downloadable content for the Rock Band video game series on 9 June 2009.

“Fear of the Dark” was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1994 in the “Best Metal Performance” category, but lost to “I Don’t Want To Change The World” by Ozzy Osbourne.[2]

When the song is performed live, the audience always sings along to the melody during the soft (and sometimes the heavy) sections, at times becoming louder than the band themselves. It has been featured on all the band’s live albums since its release.

The cover features Eddie as Steve himself playing on his bass guitar live on stage.

The Evil That Men Do (song)

“The Evil That Men Do” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is the band’s seventeenth single and the second from their seventh studio album, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988). The single debuted at number six in the UK charts and quickly rose to number five. The single’s B-sides are re-recordings of “Prowler” and “Charlotte the Harlot” which appear as tracks number one and seven/eight respectively on the band’s debut album Iron Maiden.

The title of the song is taken from Marcus Antonius’s speech while addressing the crowd of Romans after Caesar’s murder (Act 3, scene 2, “The Forum”) in William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar: “The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones.” Bruce Dickinson may sometimes repeat this before playing the song, but in reverse (as he did in Rock in Rio). However, the poetic lyrics of the song are unrelated to this.

The guitar solo in “The Evil That Men Do” is played by Adrian Smith while the guitar solo in “Prowler ’88” is played by Dave Murray. In “Charlotte the Harlot ’88”, the first guitar solo is played by Dave Murray followed by Adrian Smith.

The music video was filmed at The Forum in Inglewood, CA, during the Seventh Tour of a Seventh Tour in 1988.

El Dorado (Iron Maiden song)

“El Dorado” is the second track from English heavy metal band Iron Maiden’s 2010 album The Final Frontier. The song is the band’s forty-first single, and the only one from the album. It was made available as a free download on the band’s official site at 00:01 on 8 June 2010 (UTC), one day before the album’s supporting tour began.[2] The cover art was created by Anthony Dry and is based on the covers of the EC Comics published by William Gaines that were popular in the 1950s. Regarding the early online release of the song, vocalist Bruce Dickinson explained, “El Dorado is a preview of the forthcoming studio album. As we will be including it in the set of our Final Frontier World Tour, we thought it would be great to thank all our fans and get them into The Final Frontier mood by giving them this song up front of the tour and album release.”[2]

Dickinson explained that the lyrics are a cynical critique of the financial crisis of 2007–08, comparing the bankers responsible with the people who sold the myth of El Dorado:[1]

[El Dorado] has a cynical lyric about the economic crap that’s been happening. It seemed a bit like a perfect storm; people were borrowing money like crazy. I thought, “This is really going to screw people up” and sure enough, we’re all in deep doo-doo! And that’s what El Dorado is about, it’s about selling somebody the myth that “The streets are paved with gold” and them asking, “Where do I sign up?”

“El Dorado” won the Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance in 2011.[3] It is the band’s first win following two previous nominations (“Fear of the Dark” in 1994 and “The Wicker Man” in 2001).[4][5]

The song’s guitar solo, which lasts from about 3:42 to 4:23, is a trade-off divided into three parts; the first is played by Adrian Smith (3:42-3:53), the second by Dave Murray (3:53-4:06), and the third, which segues into the verse riff again, by Janick Gers (4:06-4:23).[6]

Different World (song)

“Different World” is the first track from English heavy metal band Iron Maiden’s 2006 album A Matter of Life and Death. The song is the band’s thirty-fifth single, and is also the second single from the album, released on 14 November 2006 in the United States, and 26 December 2006 in Europe. The song has been stated by the band to be a tribute to Thin Lizzy due to the low sounding melodies sung by Bruce Dickinson that are reminiscent of those Phil Lynott would sing. It was played first every night on the band’s A Matter of Life and Death Tour.

The guitar solo in “Different World” is played by Adrian Smith.

The song is featured in the skateboarding video game Tony Hawk’s Downhill Jam.

The all-female tribute band, The Iron Maidens, recorded an acoustic cover of the song on their 2008 EP The Root of All Evil.

The Clairvoyant (song)

“The Clairvoyant” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is the band’s nineteenth single and the third from their seventh studio album, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988). The single, which was also released as a clear vinyl, debuted at number six in the British charts. It contains three live performances from Maiden’s 1988 headlining performance at the Monsters of Rock festival in Donington Park.

The promotional video for the song, although set to the studio version, features live clips from the Donington performance.

Can I Play with Madness

“Can I Play with Madness” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The song is the sixteenth single released by the band. Released in 1988, it was the first single from their seventh studio album, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988), and hit number 3 in the UK charts. The song is about a young man who wants to learn the future from an old prophet with a crystal ball. The young man thinks he is going mad and seeks the old prophet to help him cope with his visions/nightmares. The prophet’s advice is ignored by the young man and they become angry with each other. The song was originally a ballad named “On the Wings of Eagles”, written by Adrian Smith.

The song’s guitar solo is played by Adrian Smith.

Bring Your Daughter… to the Slaughter

“Bring Your Daughter… to the Slaughter” is the second single from No Prayer for the Dying, Iron Maiden’s first full-length album in over two years (following the 1988 release Seventh Son of a Seventh Son).[3]

The song was originally recorded and released by Bruce Dickinson for the soundtrack to A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child,[4][5] but Steve Harris liked it so Iron Maiden rerecorded it.[3] It is the only UK No. 1 single for the band to date,[6] in spite of the fact that it received very little airplay on the BBC.

Be Quick or Be Dead

“Be Quick or Be Dead” is a song by English heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released as the first single release from their ninth studio album Fear of the Dark, released in 1992.[2]

The song is about several political scandals taking place at the time of its release, including the Robert Maxwell banking scandal, European stock market crashes, and the BCCI case. It was released a month prior to the album and reached No. 2 on the UK singles chart. The song is faster and heavier than most Iron Maiden songs, and is the band’s first single co-written by Janick Gers.

The B-side features two official songs and one hidden track, including an original blues number (“Nodding Donkey Blues”) and Montrose cover (“Space Station No. 5”), and the unlisted “Bayswater Ain’t a Bad Place to Be”.[2] The last is a spoken word comedy piece by Bruce Dickinson (along with acoustic guitar accompaniment from Janick Gers) in which he imitates and makes fun of Maiden manager Rod Smallwood. A similar mockery of Smallwood was released before, as a B-side titled “Sheriff of Huddersfield”, which was available in the “Wasted Years” single.

The song was featured in the video game Carmageddon 2.

The Angel and the Gambler

“The Angel and the Gambler” is a single from the Iron Maiden album Virtual XI, released in 1998. It preceded the release of Virtual XI by two weeks.

It is the first Iron Maiden single to feature a video as a B-side. The singles includes two audio tracks recorded live at Kåren, Gothenburg, Sweden in 1995 on the “The X Factour” tour in support of The X-Factor album.

To support the single with more airplay, the band also released a music video, which featured the shortened version of the song. In an almost Star Wars fashion, the video features an entirely computer-generated world filled with aliens of varying quality. The concept for the video, particularly Blaze walking in to the bar with a brown hat and a long jacket were taken from concept art designed for the Somewhere in Time album, specifically the single “Stranger in a Strange Land”.

The single was released in four parts: CD part 1 contains a poster, with the “Virtual XI Fixture List 1998” on one side and the band posing in Maiden football gear with some of their favourite players on the other side. CD part 2 contains three double-sided cards with the musicians posing in Maiden football gear and also has a shortened version of “The Angel and the Gambler”. The third was a 7″ picture disc and the fourth was a CD maxi-single with both b-side live tracks on it. The picture disc and maxi-single both had the edited version of the title track.

Aces High (song)

“Aces High” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden, written by the band’s bassist Steve Harris. It is Iron Maiden’s eleventh single release and the second from their fifth studio album, Powerslave (1984).

The first B-side is a cover of Nektar’s “King of Twilight”, from their 1972 album A Tab in the Ocean. Their cover is actually a medley of the songs “Crying in the Dark” and “King of Twilight”, the last two songs on the album. The Japanese 12″ was mixed with the B-side covers from “The Trooper” & “2 Minutes To Midnight” singles.[1][2][verification needed]

2 Minutes to Midnight

“2 Minutes to Midnight” is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden, featured on their fifth studio album, Powerslave (1984). It was released as the band’s tenth single, and first from the album on 6 August 1984 and rose to number 11 in the UK Singles Chart and number 25 on Billboard Top Album Tracks.

“2 Minutes to Midnight” was written by Adrian Smith and Bruce Dickinson.

The song title references the Doomsday Clock, the symbolic clock used by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, which represents a countdown to potential global catastrophe. In September 1953 the clock reached two minutes to midnight, the closest it ever got to midnight, when the United States and Soviet Union tested H-bombs within nine months of one another.[1] According to Dickinson, the song critically addresses “the romance of war” in general rather than the Cold War in particular.[2]

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