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Until It Sleeps

“Until It Sleeps” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica from their 1996 album Load. It was the band’s first number one song on the US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, as well as their first and only song as of the release of Death Magnetic to hit the top 10 of the Billboard Hot 100, debuting and peaking at number 10.[2]

The song was performed with orchestral accompaniment on the album S&M.

The View (song)

“The View” is a single by American singer Lou Reed and American heavy metal band Metallica. It is the only single taken from the studio album Lulu, released on September 27, 2011.[3]

The song was poorly received by fans of Reed and Metallica. The song also spawned a popular meme among fans and critics alike, likening James Hetfield to a table, due to Hetfield yelling “I am the table” towards the end of the song. The meme spawned numerous edits to Hetfield’s Wikipedia page where “table” was added to his professions.

The Unnamed Feeling

“The Unnamed Feeling” is the third single by heavy metal band Metallica, taken from the eighth studio album St. Anger. The song is about an unnamed feeling (anxiety, according to Hetfield) a person feels when they are close to the edge of losing control, just before he or she panics.

Along with a music video, the song was released as a single exclusively to Australia. It was released as part of an E.P. in the UK. The unique video, directed by The Malloys, featured the band performing in a virtually empty room that gradually closed in on them throughout the song. This was accompanied by visual stories of several people all experiencing that “unnamed feeling” in their own way.

The front cover for the basic singles depicts the “monster” from their other St. Anger single, “Some Kind of Monster”. However, cover art for the Australia-exclusive CD single for “The Unnamed Feeling” was chosen by Metallica through a contest where Australian fans could submit their own original artwork. The winning piece by Louis Claveria depicts an isolated illustration of a black heart roughly outlined in white with a black background. Claveria’s artwork was autographed by the band and framed, and all four finalists were featured in an exclusive poster insert included in the single. Exclusive live B-sides from Metallica’s first show at the Big Day Out festival in Brisbane were featured on the Australian single.[1]

The Unforgiven (song)

“The Unforgiven” is a power ballad by American thrash metal band Metallica. It was released as the second single from their eponymous fifth album Metallica. Though one of the slower tracks on the album, its chord progression is distinctly one of the heavier. The song deals with the theme of the struggle of the individual against the efforts of those who would subjugate him.[1]

The song has since spawned two sequels (both in name proper as well as thematically, albeit not musically), in the form of “The Unforgiven II”, from the album ReLoad, and “The Unforgiven III”, from the album Death Magnetic.

The Unforgiven (song)

“The Unforgiven” is a power ballad by American thrash metal band Metallica. It was released as the second single from their eponymous fifth album Metallica. Though one of the slower tracks on the album, its chord progression is distinctly one of the heavier. The song deals with the theme of the struggle of the individual against the efforts of those who would subjugate him.[1]

The song has since spawned two sequels (both in name proper as well as thematically, albeit not musically), in the form of “The Unforgiven II”, from the album ReLoad, and “The Unforgiven III”, from the album Death Magnetic.

The Memory Remains

“The Memory Remains” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica, with British singer and songwriter Marianne Faithfull singing backup. It was the lead single from their seventh studio album, ReLoad, released in 1997. It was first performed live in a “jam” version on July 2, 1996.[2] Faithfull was brought in as James Hetfield felt her “weathered, smellin’-the-cigarettes-on-the-CD voice” fit what he described as “the whole eeriness of the Sunset Boulevard-feel of the song”, given the lyrics tell the story of a faded artist who goes insane from losing her fame.[3] The spoken words “Say yes, at least say hello” during the outro, are a reference to The Misfits, which is the last movie Marilyn Monroe starred in.[4]

The song was written by James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich. Part of the intro riff is similar to Black Sabbath’s song “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath.” It can be heard playing in the strip club Bada Bing! in the episode of The Sopranos, “The Knight in White Satin Armor.” The song was used by WWE as one of the official theme songs to WrestleMania XXVIII promoting the “End of an Era” Hell in a Cell match between Triple H and The Undertaker.

The Judas Kiss (song)

“The Judas Kiss” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica, the fourth single taken from their ninth studio album, Death Magnetic.

On September 8, 2008, it was made available for streaming on the band’s official website, as well as a download (for Platinum Members only) from the Death Magnetic website Mission: Metallica. It has since been made available for purchase as a digital single in the iTunes Store. Part of the beginning to “The Judas Kiss” was also featured in an online video on the official website and Mission: Metallica revealing the album’s title. The first live performance of the song was at the Trent FM Arena in Nottingham, UK on 25 February 2009 as part of their opening gig in the European leg of their World Magnetic Tour.

The song’s title refers to The Bible, where Judas Iscariot betrayed Jesus by kissing him.

The God That Failed (song)

“The God That Failed” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica, from their 1991 self-titled album. The song was never released as a single, but was the first song of the album to be heard by the public. It was one of Metallica’s first original releases to be tuned half a step down.

Composer and lyricist James Hetfield described the song as “very nice… Slow, heavy and ugly.”[1] Lead guitarist Kirk Hammett recalls the inception of his solo in the song: “I had this whole thing worked out, but it didn’t fit because the lead was too bluesy for the song, which is characterized by real heavy riffing and chording.”[2] According to Hammett, he and producer Bob Rock worked out his guitar solo on the song. Together they composed a melody to which Hammett wanted to add harmony. The producer suggested that this would make the song sound too “pretty”, and instead recommended playing the melody an octave higher. The final guitar solo was put together from over a dozen performances by the guitarist during the recording of the album. Hammett calls the resulting work one of his favorite solos on the album.[2]

The Day That Never Comes

“The Day That Never Comes” is a song by heavy metal band Metallica, and the lead single from their ninth studio album, Death Magnetic. The song was released to the radio and for digital download on August 21, 2008.[1]

The working title of the song was “Casper”, as shown in the Mission: Metallica videos and in “Demo Magnetic”.

St. Anger (song)

“St. Anger” is a song by American heavy metal group Metallica. It was released in June 2003 as the lead single from their eighth studio album of the same name. It won Best Metal Performance at the 46th Grammy Awards and was also nominated for Best Rock Video at the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards, but lost to “Somewhere I Belong” by Linkin Park.[1][2]

This song provided the theme for WWE’s SummerSlam 2003; the music video was also included in the pay-per-view DVD.

The lyric “Fuck it all and fuckin’ no regrets, I hit the lights on these dark sets” may be a reference to two other Metallica songs, “Damage, Inc.” (Master of Puppets) and “Hit the Lights” (Kill ‘Em All). [3] [4]

Seek & Destroy

“Seek & Destroy” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica and ninth track from their debut studio album, Kill ‘Em All. It was also featured on the demo No Life ’til Leather.[1] It was the first song the band recorded in a studio. “Seek & Destroy” has been frequently performed at the group’s concerts since its live debut in 1982 and had been Metallica’s closing song from the Madly in Anger with the World Tour to the Metallica By Request Tour. It is the third most performed song in the band’s history, having been played 1,359 times as of August 2016, behind only Creeping Death (1,446) and Master of Puppets (1,503).[2][3][4][5]

During the 2004 documentary film about Metallica, Some Kind of Monster, the song is used when footage of the band down the years is shown highlighting the progression in the group’s appearance and sound over time. In AOL Radio’s list of the 10 Best Metallica Songs, “Seek & Destroy” was ranked at number 4,[6] and Allmusic’s Steve Huey chose the song as an AMG Track Pick from Kill ‘Em All.[7]

Following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the song was placed on the list of post-9/11 inappropriate titles distributed by Clear Channel.

Nothing Else Matters

“Nothing Else Matters” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica. It was released in 1992 as the third single from their self-titled fifth studio album, Metallica. The song peaked at number 11 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart as well as top-ten positions on many European charts. “Nothing Else Matters” was featured as a playable track in the music video game Guitar Hero: Metallica. Recognized as one of Metallica’s best known and most popular songs, it has become a staple in live performances. The song has been covered over forty times.

Master of Puppets (song)

“Master of Puppets” is a song by the American heavy metal band Metallica, released in France only on July 2, 1986 as the only single from the band’s 1986 third studio album of the same name. It was also issued as a promo single in the US by Elektra Records.[1]

The song was recorded during October–December 1985 at Sweet Silence Studios in Copenhagen, Denmark[2][3]

It is the second and title track of the album, preceded by a shorter, high-speed typical thrash metal track, “Battery”, a similar sequencing heard on Metallica’s second (Ride the Lightning) and fourth (…And Justice for All) albums. “Master of Puppets” is also notable for its extensive use of downpicking and long instrumental section, beginning at 3:34.

The song, as lead singer James Hetfield explained, “deals pretty much with drugs. How things get switched around, instead of you controlling what you’re taking and doing, it’s drugs controlling you.”[4] The song was bassist Cliff Burton’s favorite song on the album, as quoted when the album was released. The song is one of the band’s most famous and popular songs, frequently played at concerts.

King Nothing

“King Nothing” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica from their 1996 album Load.

The song King Nothing, written by James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich, and Kirk Hammett, circles around the theme of “be careful what you wish for.” The song starts on a bass riff which develops into the main riff of the song. A single of “King Nothing” was released in the United States. It included a live version of the song “Ain’t My Bitch”, which is also on the album Load. A music video also accompanied the song. The guitars and bass are both tuned to Eb.

At the end of the song, the words “Off to never-never land” can be heard. This is a nod to one of Metallica’s most famous songs, “Enter Sandman”, which also features these words. The song also features a similar structure.

“King Nothing” was featured as background music in the ninth episode of the second season of The Sopranos, “From Where to Eternity”, in a scene in which Tony Soprano is speaking with Paulie Gualtieri in the Bada Bing strip club.

On the U.S. charts, the song reached number 90 on the Billboard Hot 100, while peaking at number six on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart.

Jump in the Fire

“Jump in the Fire” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica. It was released as the second and final single from their debut album, Kill ‘Em All. The single was accompanied by fake live performances of “Phantom Lord” and “Seek & Destroy” which were alternate studio recordings with sounds of a crowd overdubbed in.

Alongside “Hit the Lights” and “No Remorse”, “Jump in the Fire” is one of Metallica’s first original songs, having been included on Ron McGovney’s ’82 Garage demo, an unreleased recording. The original lyrics and content, which dealt with sex, were written by Dave Mustaine in his former band “Panic” at the age of 16. The original version that Mustaine introduced to Hetfield and Ulrich upon joining Metallica was raw. The three worked together on refining the song and the final outcome is what is heard on the demo. However, much like the events surrounding “The Four Horsemen”, new lyrics were written by James Hetfield upon Mustaine’s departure from Metallica. The new lyrics revolve around people being damned to Hell and therefore “jumping in the fire.” Lars Ulrich claims that they had written the song to sound like “Run to the Hills” by Iron Maiden, which was popular at the time.[2] Current live performances since 2004 are in D standard tuning, as opposed to the E standard tuning of earlier live performances.

I Disappear

“I Disappear” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica. The song was recorded as a contribution to the Mission: Impossible II soundtrack and reached #1 on the Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks for seven (non-consecutive) weeks in summer 2000. It does not appear on any of Metallica’s studio albums, making it the band’s only standalone single. The song, which won a 2000 Metal Edge Readers’ Choice Award for “Song of the Year From a Movie Soundtrack,”[1] is the last Metallica studio recording to feature bassist Jason Newsted.

The discovery of an unfinished version of the song in early 2000 on the peer-to-peer file sharing network Napster helped bring the illegal sharing of mp3 files to the spotlight, leading to the lawsuits that eventually brought down the original incarnation of Napster.

Hero of the Day

“Hero of the Day” is a power ballad by American heavy metal band Metallica from their 1996 album Load. The song was first recorded on December 13, 1995, and was the first song on Load to be recorded.[citation needed] The song was also Metallica’s second single release from the album. A promotional video for the track was also filmed. It became their second consecutive number-one hit on the US Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. It is one of the few Metallica songs written primarily in a major key.

According to article in Kerrang around time of Load release, the demo for the song is entitled “Mouldy” due to the main riff reminding James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich of a typical Bob Mould sound. The demo was recorded on December 10, 1994, one of the earliest demo recordings for the Load sessions (the first demo to be recorded was for Wasting My Hate on November 28, 1994).[citation needed]

This single is notable for including four Motörhead cover songs, recorded live direct to two-track at The Plant Studios during a rehearsal for Lemmy’s 50th Birthday Party at the Whiskey A Go-Go, Los Angeles. These b-sides were later released on the second CD of the Garage Inc. compilation in 1998.[2]

Fuel (song)

“Fuel” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica. The song was written by James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich, and Kirk Hammett, and was released as the third single from their seventh album, Reload. Metallica have frequently played the song in concert over the years, including the 1999 live album S&M with Michael Kamen conducting the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Fuel was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock Performance in 1999 but lost to Jimmy Page and Robert Plant for the song “Most High.”

Harvester of Sorrow

“Harvester of Sorrow” is a song by the American heavy metal band Metallica. It was released as the first single from their fourth studio album, …And Justice for All (1988). The song debuted at a live performance prior to the release of …And Justice for All while on the summer Monsters of Rock Tour in 1988 with Van Halen, Scorpions, Dokken and Kingdom Come.

The single contained two B-sides, both of which were cover songs: “Breadfan”, originally by Budgie, and “The Prince”, originally by Diamond Head. There was an error in the mastering of the recording: At the end of “Breadfan”, a distorted voice can be heard saying “Mommy, where’s Fluffy?”. This was actually intended to be the intro to the next track, “The Prince”. However, it was separated in the wrong place.[citation needed] The band decided not to correct this error when the tracks were included on their 1998 Garage Inc. compilation.

Enter Sandman

“Enter Sandman” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica. It was released as the first single from their eponymous fifth album, Metallica in 1991. The music was written by Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich. Vocalist and rhythm guitarist Hetfield wrote the lyrics, which deal with the concept of a child’s nightmares.

The single achieved platinum certification for more than 1,000,000 copies shipped in the United States, spurring sales of over 30 million copies for Metallica and propelling Metallica to worldwide popularity. Acclaimed by critics, the song is featured in all of Metallica’s live albums and DVDs released after 1991 and has been played live at award ceremonies and benefit concerts.

Cyanide (song)

“Cyanide” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica, the third single taken from their ninth studio album, Death Magnetic. On September 1, 2008, it was made available for streaming on the band’s official website, as well as a download (for Platinum Members only) from the Death Magnetic website Mission: Metallica. It has since been made available for purchase as a digital single in the iTunes Store.

The song was played live for the first time on August 9, 2008 at Ozzfest in Dallas, Texas and was the first song from Death Magnetic to be performed live in its entirety. An audio recording of the performance is featured on the band’s MySpace page. Song was also performed live on Later…With Jools Holland in 2008.[1]

Creeping Death

“Creeping Death” is a song by the American thrash metal band Metallica, released as the lead and only commercial single from their second studio album Ride the Lightning (1984) (“Fade to Black” and “For Whom the Bell Tolls”, from the same album, were issued as promotional singles). Written from the perspective of the Angel of Death, it describes the Plague of the Death of the Firstborn (Exodus 12:29). One of Metallica’s most frequently performed songs, it has been played live 1,413 times (second only to “Master of Puppets”, at 1,467),[2] and it has occasionally been used on various tours as the opening song of the band’s set.[3] It stands as a classic example of the band’s thrash style, albeit slower than the material on their first album, Kill ‘Em All. The song’s middle section, with its ominous chants of “Die!” set to a phrygian mode chord progression, is a fan participation staple during Metallica shows.

The single was released through Music for Nations in the UK and France. The B-sides were the cover songs “Am I Evil?” (originally by Diamond Head) and “Blitzkrieg” (originally by Blitzkrieg). Together these covers were known as Garage Days Revisited, which set the stage for Metallica’s next cover album, The $5.98 E.P.: Garage Days Re-Revisited EP.

The artwork was done by Alvin Petty. The logo and the song’s title were added with a plastic layover to the existing artwork. Kirk Hammett had seen the picture hanging up at Petty’s house and remarked that it would be perfect for the single and picture-disk that were about to be finished.

Broken, Beat & Scarred

“Broken, Beat & Scarred” is the forty-fifth single by American heavy metal band Metallica, and the sixth from their ninth studio album, Death Magnetic, released on April 3, 2009.[1]

James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich argued at length over the title of this song. Hetfield said that he did not like the title, but Ulrich was “very adamant” that it should be called “Broken, Beat & Scarred.”[2]

On March 19, Metallica’s website announced “Broken, Beat & Scarred” as the next single from the album. The single was released in two formats – a digi-collectors edition and a maxi single.

Bleeding Me

“Bleeding Me” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica from their 1996 album Load.

The song was never commercially released as a single, though a promotional single was distributed to radio stations in early 1997. That year, it would reach #6 on the Mainstream Rock Charts. Both the album version and a shorter (approximately 5-6 minutes) radio edit (the most notable differences from the album track being the shortening of various instrumental passages and ending the song at the conclusion of the guitar solo).

The song has appeared from time to time in Metallica’s live set since its release in 1996 including the live album S&M with the San Francisco Symphony.

Whiplash (Metallica song)

“Whiplash” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica. It was released as the first single from their debut album, Kill ‘Em All. The song has been covered a number of times, most notably by Motörhead whose version won a Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance.[1]

“Whiplash” was first played in October 23, 1982, and was one of the last songs they wrote for Kill ‘Em All.

One (Metallica song)

“One” is an anti-war song by the American heavy metal band Metallica.[1] It was released as the third and final single from their fourth studio album, …And Justice for All (1988). “One” was also the band’s first Top 40 hit single, reaching number 35 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song hit number one in Finland.

Metallica performed “One” for the 1989 Grammy Awards show broadcast from Los Angeles. The next year the song won a Grammy Award in the first Best Metal Performance category.[2] The song is one of the band’s most popular pieces and has remained a live staple since the release of the album, making this the most played song from the album …And Justice for All.

A video for the song was introduced in January 1989 on MTV. It portrays a World War I soldier who is severely wounded—blind and unable to speak nor move—returned home as a supposed vegetable case to wait helplessly for death. His only hope is to devise a way to communicate with the hospital staff.[3] Shot in black and white by director Michael Salomon, the video’s story is intercut with scenes taken from the 1971 anti-war film Johnny Got His Gun. Due to routinely being required to pay royalty fees to continue showing the music video, Metallica bought the rights to the film. The video was ranked No. 1 on MTV soon after its introduction.[2]

Mama Said (Metallica song)

“Mama Said” is a power ballad by American heavy metal band Metallica from their sixth album Load, with music and lyrics by James Hetfield (music credited to Hetfield/Ulrich). The lyrics represent a man or boy who is learning to find his own way in life away from his mother. The song is directly written about Hetfield’s difficult relationship with his mother, who died of cancer when he was 16 years old.

The song stands out among Metallica’s predominantly metal catalog; its genre-blending style incorporates country, blues, and hard rock. “Mama Said” begins with acoustic guitar and, during the chorus, becomes flush with a country-flavored vocal harmony and steel guitar. Toward the end the song features power chords on electric guitar.

“Mama Said” has never been featured as a part of Metallica’s live setlist. Hetfield has performed this song live, however, using a single steel-stringed acoustic guitar with no drum or bass accompaniment. He also performed it along with country singer Jessi Colter on CMT’s Outlaw Concert, along with Hetfield’s cover of Waylon Jennings’s “Don’t You Think This Outlaw Bit’s Done Got Out of Hand.”

Frantic (song)

“Frantic” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica off their 2003 album St. Anger.

This song, like many others on St. Anger, is about the band’s past struggles with addictions, particularly lead singer James Hetfield’s alcohol problem, for which he spent many months in rehab. The lyrics also draw on zen axioms, most notably the Buddhist concept of dukkha brought up by Kirk Hammett: “Birth is pain. Life is pain. Death is pain.”

For Whom the Bell Tolls (Metallica song)

“For Whom the Bell Tolls” is a song by American thrash metal band Metallica. It was released as the second promotional single from their second album, Ride the Lightning. Among their most-played songs, it has, as of November 16, 2014, been performed 1,305 times, behind only “One” (1,324), “Seek & Destroy” (1,396), “Creeping Death” (1,413) and “Master of Puppets” (1,467).[1]

The song was inspired by Ernest Hemingway’s 1940 novel of the same name about the dishonor of modern warfare and the protagonist’s imminent doom during the bloody Spanish Civil War. Specific allusions are made to the scene in which five soldiers are obliterated during an air-strike, after taking a position on a hill.

“For Whom the Bell Tolls” was released as a promo single with two versions of the song, an edited version on side A and the album version on the b-side.

The chromatic introduction, which is often mistaken for an electric guitar, is in fact Cliff Burton playing his bass guitar through distortion and wah-wah. The intro was written by Burton before joining Metallica.[2] Burton first played it in 1979 in a 12-minute jam at a battle of the bands with his second band Agents of Misfortune (with his old bandmate from EZ-Street and future Faith No More guitarist “Big” Jim Martin).[3]

The guitars and bass in the song are tuned slightly sharper than standard on this performance (and sharper than the other tracks on the album). Rumors and speculation abound regarding the reason for the discrepancy, but no definitive explanation has surfaced – one reasoning is the slightly sharpened guitar tuning is used to keep the guitars in line with the song’s intro bell chimes.[citation needed]

Don’t Tread on Me (Metallica song)

“Don’t Tread on Me” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica, from the eponymous fifth album, Metallica. The title is connected with the American Revolutionary War. The words “Don’t Tread on Me” constitute the motto of the Gadsden flag, and the snake image on the flag is pictured on the cover of the album.

The instrumental introduction uses an eight bar phrase from “America”, a popular song from the musical and film West Side Story. It is in a moderate tempo of 104 bpm in 12/8.[1]

The lyrics reference American Revolutionary Patrick Henry’s quote “give me liberty or give me death” with the line “liberty or death, what we so proudly hail”. The lyric, “To secure peace, is to prepare for war” refers to the Latin adage, Si vis pacem, para bellum (“If you want peace, prepare [for] a war”). The lyrics containing rattlesnake imagery are inspired by Benjamin Franklin’s essay suggesting the rattlesnake is a good symbol for the American Spirit.

Hetfield said the song was a reaction to the anti-American tone of their album …And Justice for All – “This is the other side of that. America is a fucking good place. I definitely think that. And that feeling came about from touring a lot. You find out what you like about certain places and you find out why you live in America, even with all the bad fucked-up shit. It’s still the most happening place to hang out.”[2]

Hetfield also said “Don’t Tread On Me, I love the song, but it shocked a lot of people, because everyone thought it was pro-war when they thought we were anti-war, and alls we’re doing is writing songs, we’re not standing politically on any side. Don’t Tread On Me was just one of those ‘don’t fuck with us’ songs, and obviously referencing the flag and the snake and what it meant, that all tied into the black album and the snake icon on the album cover, and I think it’s great to play that song live. We’re over here in Europe playing it, and people aren’t appalled by the songs. We haven’t played it in Iraq or Iran yet, though.”

Better than You (Metallica song)

“Better Than You” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica. It is the fifth track on their seventh album, ReLoad. The song was originally titled “Better”. It won the 1999 Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance, it was the band’s fourth award in that category.[1] The song refers to the story of someone with an obsession to fight to be better than another.[2] The band performed a jam of the song for the first time in London in 1995.[3] The single cover features the same picture as the cover of Metallica’s Cunning Stunts as well as on the final page of Reload. The song qualifies on all grounds, lyrics full of festering resentment, Hammett giving lengthy solo.[4]

Am I Evil?

“Am I Evil?” is a song by British heavy metal band Diamond Head released on their 1980 debut album Lightning to the Nations. The song was written by vocalist Sean Harris and guitarist Brian Tatler and released on Happy Face Records, the band’s own label. The song was immediately popular among the metal circles in the United Kingdom around the time of its release, but only rose to international prominence after Metallica covered as a B-side on their “Creeping Death” single in 1984; the cover was re-released on their 1998 covers album Garage Inc. The song was influenced by the Black Sabbath song “Symptom of the Universe.” [1]

All Nightmare Long

“All Nightmare Long” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica, released as their fifth single from their ninth album Death Magnetic. The single was released on December 15, 2008.[1] The song is in Drop D tuning. It was nominated for the Kerrang! Award for Best Single.

The music video, directed by Roboshobo (Robert Schober),[2] debuted on December 7, 2008, on Metallica’s official website and Yahoo! Video.[3][4] The video, which does not feature the band, is an alternate history narrative done in grainy mockumentary style, depicting a sequence of fictional events following the historic 1908 Tunguska event, at which Soviet scientists discover spores of an extraterrestrial organism, a small harmless thing resembling an armored worm.

However, it turns out the incredibly hardy spores are able to reanimate dead tissue, and subjects turn violent sometime after exposure to the spores; a cartoon then shows the USSR adapting them as a bioweapon and scatters them from balloons in a preemptive strike against the U.S., causing a localized zombie apocalypse before intervening militarily to distribute humanitarian aid. At the end of the cartoon, a hybrid U.S.-USSR flag is raised in the now-Soviet-ruled America, and in 1972, a headless corpse is shown breaching containment and escaping from a Soviet biowarfare lab. The video ends with an incident in Arkansas, similar to the start of the video, with various news reporters reporting on chemtrails.

Ain’t My Bitch

“Ain’t My Bitch” is a song by American heavy metal band Metallica, from the sixth album Load. It is the opening track of the album and it was released as a promotional single in Mexico; it also debuted on the U.S. Mainstream Rock charts at number fifteen.[1]

“Ain’t My Bitch” gained media attention and notoriety due to its title. Vocalist/Lyricist James Hetfield later explained that the ‘bitch’ in the song does not refer to a woman, but acts as a metaphor for a problem. Under this interpretation, the song takes on a decidedly different theme, dealing with a person who harbors no concern for other people’s problems.

Lead guitarist Kirk Hammett used a slide for the guitar solo, a first for Metallica and one of the many musical departures found on Load. Upon the album’s release in June 1996, “Ain’t My Bitch” quickly became a staple in the band’s live set, featured regularly during their Poor Touring Me world tour. The song was last played in 1998, and as of 2016, has yet to be included in setlist rotation.

The song’s demo was named “Bitch” and was recorded on April 6, 1995.

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