eurohitlist.eu

Who Knows Who

“Who Knows Who” is a collaboration song by English alternative rock band Muse and English hip hop artist Mike Skinner. Not originally intended for official release, an early version of the song leaked onto several Muse internet forums in August 2008. The song was officially released as the B-side to the 7″ vinyl edition of the single “Uprising” on 7 September 2009. The lyrics were written by Skinner and the music was written by Muse’s Matthew Bellamy.[2]

Uprising (song)

“Uprising” is a song by the English rock band Muse. It was released as the lead single from the band’s fifth studio album, The Resistance, on 7 September 2009. The song was written by band member Matthew Bellamy, produced by the band themselves, and mixed by Mark ‘Spike’ Stent.[1] “Uprising” had a very positive commercial performance, peaking within the top ten in seven countries. It was certified silver in the United Kingdom, gold in four countries, platinum in two countries, and double-platinum in the United States making it Muse’s best selling single.

Uno (song)

“Uno” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse. It was released as the lead single from the band’s 1999 debut studio album Showbiz.
It was well received by critics,[citation needed] but only reached number 73 on the UK Singles Chart.[2]

The song originally featured on Muse’s second EP Muscle Museum EP. During recording, the amp used for the guitar blew up. This also happened with other songs while recording Showbiz.[3]

United States of Eurasia

“United States of Eurasia” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse and is featured on their fifth studio album The Resistance. The song was made available as a free digital download online on 21 July 2009 and is followed by an instrumental solo entitled “Collateral Damage”, based on Nocturne In E-Flat Major, Op.9 No.2 by Frédéric Chopin.

“United States of Eurasia” was the first song title to be confirmed as on The Resistance, after fans worked it out from a photograph of its sheet music uploaded on the band’s Twitter profile.[2][3] On 3 July 2009, the album’s track listing was revealed, with “United States…” positioned fourth between “Undisclosed Desires” and “Guiding Light”.[4]

In a pre-release interview featured in the August edition of music magazine Mojo, vocalist and guitarist Matthew Bellamy reveals the song to be inspired by “a book called The Grand Chessboard by Zbigniew Brzezinski,” explaining that “Brzezinski has the viewpoint that the Eurasian landmass, ie Europe, Asia and the Middle East, needs to be controlled by America to secure the oil supply.”[5] Bellamy goes on to suggest that the song is also influenced by George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, in which Eurasia is one of Earth’s three super-states.[5]

Unintended

“Unintended” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, released as the fifth and final single from their 1999 debut album, Showbiz.

The lyrics tell the story of a person coming out of depression because they have recently found happiness from love, and they now wish to see their life through to the end.[citation needed]

The music video features many lovers ‘blending’ around each other as Matthew Bellamy and the band sit around. The blending effect is achieved using the slit-scan technique.

The song was released on 5 June 2000 on 7″ vinyl – backed with a live version of “Sober” – double CD – backed with “Recess”, a live acoustic version of “Falling Down”, “Nishe” and a live acoustic version of “Hate This & I’ll Love You” – and cassette – backed with “Recess”. It reached number 20 in the UK Singles Chart – an improvement of two positions on “Sunburn” and the highest of all the singles from the album.[1]

Undisclosed Desires

“Undisclosed Desires” (also known as “Undisclosed”)[1] is a song by English rock band Muse. It was released as the second single from their fifth studio album, The Resistance, on 16 November 2009.[2] The song was written by lead vocalist Matthew Bellamy, who has described the song as “quite a personal song about me and my girlfriend.”[3] The song peaked at number 49 on the UK Singles Chart. It has also achieved large success in Australia where it as since been certified Platinum and is Muse’s highest charting single in that country.

Time Is Running Out (Muse song)

“Time Is Running Out” is a song by the English alternative rock band Muse. It is the third track on their third studio album, Absolution. The song was released as the lead single from the album on 8 September 2003 in the United Kingdom and other countries. It was also the band’s first Top 10 hit in the UK, peaking at number eight, besting the number eleven peak of “Plug In Baby”.

The single was also later released in the United States on 6 April 2004. It proved to be the band’s breakthrough hit on alternative rock radio in the country – hitting number nine on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart.

The 2nd Law: Unsustainable

“The 2nd Law: Unsustainable” is a song by English rock band Muse released on their 2012 album The 2nd Law. The song’s music video was made downloadable on 9 August 2012, but only after buying the Deluxe Box Set of the album on the band’s official site. The song appears to feature in a trailer for The 2nd Law, released on 6 June 2012, making it the first song released from The 2nd Law. Despite assumptions, due to it being the first sampling from the album, the song was never released as a single for the album.

Survival (Muse song)

“Survival” is a song by the English rock band Muse. The track is the first single from the band’s sixth studio album, The 2nd Law. It was announced on 27 June that “Survival” would serve as the official song for the London 2012 Olympics and was released following its premiere on BBC Radio 1.

In 2011, Matthew Bellamy was asked to compose a song for the London 2012 Olympics. According to him, the project then “went away,” though a song was written regardless. Bellamy and his fellow band members brought the song to Olympic staff, who “said they’d love to use it as the official tune.” The track, Bellamy noted, “expresses a sense of conviction and determination to win.”[3]

“Survival” was played as the athletes entered the stadium and in the period before medal ceremonies; international broadcasters played it while reporting on the Games. In addition, the song was featured on the album London 2012 Rock The Games.[2][3] The song was also premièred live during Muse’s live set for the London 2012 closing ceremony. However NBC, the channel that broadcasts the Olympics in the USA, did not broadcast their set.
“Survival” premiered on BBC Radio 1 on 27 June 2012.[4] It is the first single from the band’s 2012 album The 2nd Law, which was released in October.[5] The official music video was released on 4 July 2012. It features a montage of past Olympic events, including both celebratory and disappointing experiences for certain athletes.[6]

Supremacy (song)

“Supremacy” is a song by English rock band Muse. It was released on 20 February 2013 as the fourth single from their sixth studio album, The 2nd Law. “Supremacy” peaked at number 58 on the UK Singles Chart.

According to frontman Matthew Bellamy, “Supremacy” sees the band going to “absurd levels”,[2] while according to the French magazine Jeuxactu the song has elements of “Kashmir” from Led Zeppelin in its guitar riff and orchestration.[3] The track has been compared to many James Bond theme songs.[4][5][6] Drummer Dominic Howard commented on the comparisons, stating “It’s got a little bit of a Bond vibe – it all goes a bit crazy Live and Let Die in the middle.”[7]

The song was first announced as the next single after “Follow Me”, with a released date programmed for February 25, 2013.[8] However, the song itself was not released with the album version, but with a live version, featuring a full orchestra and choir taken from the 2013 BRIT Awards performance on February 20, 2013,[9] was released instead on iTunes the same night.[10][11]

Supermassive Black Hole (song)

“Supermassive Black Hole” is a song by English band Muse, featured on their fourth studio album Black Holes and Revelations. It was written by Muse lead singer and principal songwriter Matthew Bellamy. It was released as the lead single from the album in June 2006, backed with “Crying Shame”.

The song charted at number four on the UK Singles Chart, the highest singles chart position the band has achieved to date in the United Kingdom. In October 2011, NME placed it at number 74 on its list “150 Best Tracks of the Past 15 Years”.[4] It was nominated for the Kerrang! Award for Best Single.

Sunburn (Muse song)

“Sunburn” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, released as the fourth single from their 1999 debut album Showbiz.

“Sunburn” was released on 21 February 2000 on 7″ vinyl—backed with a live acoustic version of the song—and double CD—backed with “Ashamed”, a live version of the song, “Yes Please” and a live version of “Uno”. It reached number 22 in the UK Singles Chart[1]—an improvement of twenty-one positions on “Muscle Museum”.

Stockholm Syndrome (Muse song)

“Stockholm Syndrome” is a song by the English rock band Muse from their third studio album, Absolution. The song was released as the album’s first single on 14 July 2003 and also appears on the Absolution live DVD. It was released alongside its artwork as a download-only single through the official Muse website. The song’s promotional video was included in the “Time Is Running Out” CD single, and was shot using a thermal camera. A different video was made for the song’s release in the US, depicting the band playing the song in a fictitious talk show.

In March 2005, Q magazine placed “Stockholm Syndrome” at number 44 in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks.[2]

Starlight (Muse song)

“Starlight” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse from their fourth studio album Black Holes and Revelations (2006). It was released on 4 September 2006 in the United Kingdom as the second single from Black Holes and Revelations.[1] The lyric “Our hopes and expectations, black holes and revelations” gives the album its title.

The song peaked at number 13 on the UK Singles Chart.[2] It was also the second single released in the United States, reaching number two on the Modern Rock Tracks chart.[3] The song was first played live during the Radio 1’s Big Weekend festival in summer 2006.[4]

Sing for Absolution

“Sing for Absolution” is a song by English rock band Muse, serving as the title track for their third studio album, Absolution. It was released in May 2004 as the fourth single from that album, peaking at #16 in the UK Singles Chart (see 2004 in British music). The song also appears on the Absolution Tour DVD. A live acoustic version of the song serves as a B-side for the “Butterflies and Hurricanes” single.

“Sing for Absolution” is composed in the key of D minor, and moves at a slow tempo of 86 bpm.[1] The song’s vocal range spans from G3 to A4.[1] When performed live, the song is transposed down half a step, into C sharp minor.

Drummer Dominic Howard has said that the song is about finding absolution through singing and writing music, Dom said: The song “Sing For Absolution” is about the music writing and making music. This can also be a kind of absolution, but not in the religious sense intentioned. Absolution may mean that you will find an absoluteness or something positive. Through things you might not quite understand, or things that are strange or confusing things that you look at first as a negative singing, in other word, making music can be a way to understand these things. To pack in a context that makes them understandable.[2]

Revolt (Muse song)

“Revolt” is a song by the English rock band Muse from their seventh studio album, Drones (2015). It was released as the third single from the album on 4 November 2015.[2]

In his review of the album, Gigwise’s Andrew Trendell called the song a “squelchy synth-fuelled call to arms and power ballad for the space-age, somewhere between Bryan Adams, Journey and Eurovision”.[3] The NME’s Mark Beaumont described the song as “a two-speed storm built on monumental riffs”.[4]

The “theatrical” video features the band “performing against a backdrop of dystopian warfare between man and drone”.[2] Shot in Prague, the band “wanted the video in black and white only using color to represent revolution”.[5] The video was made available on Apple Music,[5] while a ‘Virtual Reality’ version can be viewed on vrse.com.[6]

Resistance (song)

“Resistance” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, featured on their fifth studio album The Resistance. Written by vocalist, guitarist and pianist Matthew Bellamy, it was released as the third single from the album, following “Uprising” and “Undisclosed Desires”, on 22 February 2010.[1] The song makes several references to the novel “1984”, by George Orwell. The intro of the song is used in the trailer of the last episode of BBC show Silent Witness. In February 2010, Muse had uploaded a picture puzzle of “Resistance” artwork on their official Facebook page. The puzzle itself has a making of the “Resistance” track (which will be able to see it after solving the puzzle). This song was featured in a promo for an episode of Human Target. The song was also released as downloadable content for the music video game Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock.

Psycho (Muse song)

“Psycho” is a song by the English rock band Muse from their seventh studio album Drones, released on 12 March 2015 as a promotional single.[2] It was later featured as the B-side to the official lead single later that month, “Dead Inside”.

Critics have described “Psycho” as a hard rock[3] and glam rock[4] song. The song’s main riff has been “in and out of [the band’s] live set” for quite some time, and the song was described by the NME as “sixteen years in the making.”[5] It is notably featured between “Stockholm Syndrome” and “Take a Bow” in the live video album HAARP.

Replying to a fan question on his Twitter account, Matthew Bellamy referred to the song’s explicit lyrics as “too offensive for radio”.[6]

Reapers (song)

“Reapers” is a song by English rock band Muse. It was released as the second promotional single from the band’s seventh studio album Drones, and was given a 7″ single release, as part of Record Store Day 2016, on 16 April 2016. The song has peaked at number 75 on the French Singles Chart, number 71 on the Swiss Hitparade singles chart, number 37 on Billboard’s Hot Rock Songs, and number 2 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Songs; it is the band’s highest-charting track to date on the latter.

“Reapers” was originally released a promotional single for Drones on 29 May 2015. The song got an actual single release as a Record Store Day 7″ picture disc vinyl on 16 April 2016. The A-side consisted of the song’s album version, while the B-side consisted of a live performance at the Gloria Theater in Köln, Germany. The release also included a fold-your-own paper plane (marketed as a “paper drone”).[2][3]

Plug In Baby

“Plug In Baby” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse. It was released as the lead single from the band’s second studio album Origin of Symmetry on 5 March 2001.
The song became the band’s highest-charting single in the UK when it peaked at number 11 on the UK Singles Chart, until it was surpassed by “Time Is Running Out”, which peaked at number 8 in 2003.[1] Today, “Plug In Baby” is considered one of Muse’s most notable songs, and has been featured on the live albums Hullabaloo Soundtrack (2002) and HAARP (2008).

Panic Station

“Panic Station” is a song by English rock band Muse, released as the fifth single from their sixth studio album The 2nd Law on 31 May 2013. The song was written by Matthew Bellamy. It is featured as the third track on the album.

The music video for “Panic Station” was filmed in January 2013 in Japan, during when the band was appearing in the country’s The 2nd Law World Tour. It was released on 22 April 2013.[4] The video is set in Tokyo.[5]

The original video featured the Rising Sun Flag in the intro. This drew the ire of many East Asian listeners, who felt that the flag represented Japanese militarism from World War II. The controversy led the band to apologise through Twitter and re-upload a new version of the video, which replaced the Rising Sun Flag with the Japanese flag.[6][7]

New Born

“New Born” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse from their second studio album Origin of Symmetry, released in 2001. It was released as the second single from the album on 5 June 2001.
The song proved to be a commercial success, peaking at number 12 on the UK Singles Chart.[4] The song was also featured on the Hullabaloo live DVD.

“New Born” is written in the key of E minor. The song starts out at a relatively fast tempo of 147 bpm, and then increases pace during each verse. The melodic introduction features some modern minimalist style piano work. The song is also recognizable for its distinct guitar riff, which is based on a circle of fifths progression.

Regarding the meaning of the song, Matthew Bellamy has said: “It’s about a semi-fear of the evolution of technology, and how in reality it’s destroying all humanity. My fear is that we can’t control it because it’s moving faster than we are, so the song’s setting myself in a location in the future where the body is no longer important and everyone’s plugged into a network. The opening line is ‘link it to the world’, so it’s connecting yourself on a worldwide scale and being born into another reality.”[citation needed]

Chris Wolstenholme also said: “”New Born”, I think between the three of us is probably one of our favourite tracks off Origin of Symmetry. It is a good live track. I think it’s one of the songs which showcases the experimental side of the band. It is not really a conventional pop song. I think a lot of the reason for choosing these songs is that we went for the heavier more direct kind of songs rather than going for anything too mellow”.[5]

Neutron Star Collision (Love Is Forever)

“Neutron Star Collision (Love Is Forever)” is a song by the English alternative rock band Muse, featured on the soundtrack to the 2010 film The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. Recorded by the band in 2010, the song was released as the lead single from the album on 17 May 2010.[1] The song is available to purchase as a digital download from the band’s official website, among several other digital sources.[2]

The single became a top ten hit in Italy. It was also certified gold by Federation of the Italian Music Industry.[3]

Muscle Museum

“Muscle Museum” is song by English alternative rock band Muse, released as the third single from their 1999 debut album Showbiz.

The title likely derives from the fact that the words “muscle” and “museum” come immediately before and after the word “muse” in most dictionaries.[citation needed]

The music video is directed by Joseph Kahn and features different people in a suburban neighbourhood, crying in different situations. Joseph Kahn wanted to express the “sadness” of life in the suburbs where every house looks more or less the same. Individual expression is not possible because of the surroundings and the rules in those suburbs and happiness (or pretending to be happy) is mandatory.

Though Joseph Kahn himself thinks of the video as one of the best he made, he believes that most people, including Muse, don’t like the video.[citation needed]

Mercy (Muse song)

“Mercy” is a song by English rock band Muse from their seventh album, Drones. It was released as the second single from the album on 18 May 2015.[4]

The song is part of a concept album about “the journey of a human, from their abandonment and loss of hope, to their indoctrination by the system to be a human drone, to their eventual defection from their oppressors”.[5] On the band’s website, writer and singer Matthew Bellamy stated that “[t]he opening line of ‘Mercy’ – Help me I’ve fallen on the inside – is a reference to the protagonist knowing and recognizing that they have lost something, they have lost themselves. This is where they realize they’re being overcome by the dark forces that were introduced in ‘Psycho’.”[6]

In his review of Drones, NME’s Mark Beaumont described the song as “infectious electro-rock”.[3] Consequence of Sound’s Collin Brennan called it an “anthem” reminiscent of “latter-day U2”.[7] In similar fashion, Gigwise’s Andrew Trendell described the song as a “driving and pulsing piano-led arena power-anthem”. Likening it to the music from the band’s fourth album Black Holes And Revelations, he called the song a “close cousin to ‘Starlight'[…], albeit with a rejuvenated energy and very forward-looking approach”.[8]

Map of the Problematique

“Map of the Problematique” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, released as the fifth single from their fourth studio album Black Holes and Revelations on 18 June 2007 as a digital download only.[1] The release date followed the two concerts Muse performed at Wembley Stadium on 16 and 17 June.[2]

The title is a reference to the book The Limits to Growth (1972) and the Club of Rome think-tank who would create a “map of the problematique” detailing the “global problematique” – a set of likely challenges the world might face in the near future. In addition, the opening lyric, “fear and panic in the air” may be a reference to Mars, in that the red planet’s two moons are named Phobos and Deimos, who were the Greek gods of Fear and Panic. Such a connection would fit in with numerous references to Mars in the album.

“Map of the Problematique” was used in trailers for Children of Men (2006) and The Tourist (2010), and the commercial for Prison Break. The song was used in whole in the ICRC’s short film ‘Our world, our challenges’. A short clip of the song was also used during the BBC’s coverage of Rugby Sevens World Series. The song was also used as the “countdown” theme at the opening ceremonies of the 2012 London Olympics.

Madness (Muse song)

“Madness” is a song by English rock band Muse. It is the second track on the band’s sixth studio album, The 2nd Law, and the second single to be released from the album. The song was released as a digital download on 20 August 2012. It was written by Muse frontman Matthew Bellamy and produced by the band themselves. The official music video for the song premiered on 5 September 2012. It spent 19 weeks at the summit of Billboard’s Alternative Songs chart, making it the longest running number-one song on the chart, beating out the previous record of 18 weeks set by Foo Fighters’ “The Pretender”. The song earned a nomination in the Best Rock Song category at the 2013 Grammy Awards, but lost to “Lonely Boy” by the Black Keys. The song was featured in Turner Broadcasting’s promotions for the 2013 March Madness games on TBS and TNT.[1]

Knights of Cydonia

“Knights of Cydonia” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse and is the closing track on their 2006 album Black Holes and Revelations. The song’s title comes in part from the region of Mars named Cydonia, famous for the “face on Mars”. Cydonia or Kydonia is an ancient part of Chania on the Greek island of Crete.

The radio edit version was first aired on KROQ-FM radio on 6 June 2006, and released to other radio stations in the United States on 12 June 2006. The song was released as the third single from Black Holes & Revelations in the UK on 27 November 2006, debuting at No 10 in the UK Singles Chart (see 2006 in British music).[1] It also hit the No. 10 spot on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart in the United States, becoming their third top-ten hit on that chart. The song was described by BBC Radio 1 DJ Annie Mac on 27 October 2006 as ‘six minutes and seven seconds of pure genius’. In 2007, Eve of Summer recorded a remix.

Invincible (Muse song)

“Invincible” is a song by English rock band Muse, released as the fourth single from their fourth studio album Black Holes & Revelations on 9 April 2007 in the United Kingdom (see 2007 in British music).[1] The single debuted at #21 on 15 April, becoming the first single from Black Holes and Revelations not to debut in the Top 20 the first week physical formats were available.[2] Bellamy cites David Bowie’s “Heroes” as an influence to the song.

Dead Star/In Your World

“Dead Star” and “In Your World” are songs by English rock band Muse. Written for and included in a live form on their 2002 compilation album Hullabaloo Soundtrack, the songs were released as a double A-side single to promote the album, and as an EP in Japan and France. The single reached number thirteen on the UK Singles Chart.[2]

A video for “In Your World” was also produced, included on the double A-side, which consisted of a live performance and was directed by Matt Askem.[citation needed] The video is considerably shorter than the audio-only live album version, with running times of 2:35 and 3:12 respectively. The video for “Dead Star” shows the band practising in a dark basement and was directed by Tim Qualtrough and Tom Kirk.[citation needed] It has a running time of 3:40, again shorter than the audio-only live album version which has a running time of 4:12. It was recorded in Winston Churchill’s house in Brighton.[citation needed]

Hysteria (Muse song)

“Hysteria” (also known as “Hysteria (I Want It Now)” in the United States)[1] is a song by English alternative rock band Muse and is featured on their third studio album, Absolution. It was also released as a single from that album on 1 December 2003 in the United Kingdom, peaking at number 17 in the UK Singles Chart (see 2003 in British music). The song is also well known for its intricate bass line, which was voted the sixth best bass line of all time on MusicRadar.[2] It reached number 9 in the US on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart.

The artwork for the 7″ cover was chosen by competition, and the winner was Adam Falkus.[3] The runner-up images are included in the DVD version of the single. The song was performed regularly during the tour in support of Absolution and remains a staple of the band’s live show. The song also appears on the Absolution Tour DVD and on both the CD and DVD of HAARP.

Hyper Music/Feeling Good

“Hyper Music” and “Feeling Good” are songs by the English alternative rock band Muse from their second album Origin of Symmetry (2001), released as a double A-side single on 19 November 2001.

“Hyper Music” was written by vocalist and guitarist Matthew Bellamy. “Feeling Good” was written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley for the 1964 musical The Roar of the Greasepaint – The Smell of the Crowd, later covered by jazz/soul singer Nina Simone.

A softer, acoustic version of “Hyper Music” was recorded under the title of “Hyper Chondriac Music” and included on Muse’s 2002 compilation album Hullabaloo Soundtrack.

Follow Me (Muse song)

“Follow Me” is a song by the English rock band Muse, written by Matthew Bellamy for their sixth studio album, The 2nd Law. It appears as the sixth track on the album. The song was released as the third single off The 2nd Law on 7 December 2012, just over two months after the album was released.[1]

“Follow Me”, which is co-produced by Nero,[2][3] contains influences from dubstep, like the early promotional, “The 2nd Law: Unsustainable”.[4][5][6] The song also contains instrumental elements from their previous two studio albums, Black Holes and Revelations and concept album The Resistance,[7] both of which were electronically inspired, like The 2nd Law. The beginning of the track features Bellamy’s newborn son Bingham’s heartbeat, recorded on Bellamy’s iPhone. According to Bellamy, the song is about “having a baby and all that.” This was later confirmed in an NME article[8] where the song was described as Bellamy’s “ode to fatherhood.” It was featured in the end credits of the film World War Z.

“Follow Me” was originally released to radio stations as a promotional single from The 2nd Law, alongside “Panic Station” on 24 September 2012.[9] In October, it was confirmed that the song would serve as the third single from the album, after much speculation and debate.[1] In the lead up to the single release, Muse issued another single, a live version of the song, recorded during the band’s performance at the O2 arena during the 2nd Law Tour. It was offered as a free download on 31 October 2012.[10] Muse released a lyric video for the song on 1 November 2012.[11]

Exogenesis: Symphony

“Exogenesis: Symphony”, commonly known as simply “Exogenesis”, is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, featured on their 2009 fifth studio album The Resistance. Written by lead vocalist, guitarist and pianist Matthew Bellamy over the course of a number of years, the song is presented as a symphony in three movements entitled “Overture”, “Cross-Pollination” and “Redemption”, respectively, each occupying a separate track at the end of the album and spanning nearly 13 minutes in total. “Exogenesis” was released as a single in the United States on 17 April 2010, with 500 copies to be made available by import in the United Kingdom through the band’s official website.[3]

On 30 October 2012, an official music video directed by Japanese comedian Tekken was released for Redemption, the third part of the Exogenesis Symphony.[4]

Defector (song)

“Defector” is a song by English rock band Muse. It serves as the eighth track and fourth promotional single from the band’s seventh studio album Drones. The song is preceded by a track titled “[JFK]”, a minute-long track consisting of speech from former United States president John F. Kennedy, which crossfades into “Defector”. The song peaked at number 85 on the French Singles Chart.

Dead Star/In Your World

“Dead Star” and “In Your World” are songs by English rock band Muse. Written for and included in a live form on their 2002 compilation album Hullabaloo Soundtrack, the songs were released as a double A-side single to promote the album, and as an EP in Japan and France. The single reached number thirteen on the UK Singles Chart.[2]

A video for “In Your World” was also produced, included on the double A-side, which consisted of a live performance and was directed by Matt Askem.[citation needed] The video is considerably shorter than the audio-only live album version, with running times of 2:35 and 3:12 respectively. The video for “Dead Star” shows the band practising in a dark basement and was directed by Tim Qualtrough and Tom Kirk.[citation needed] It has a running time of 3:40, again shorter than the audio-only live album version which has a running time of 4:12. It was recorded in Winston Churchill’s house in Brighton.[citation needed]

Dead Inside (song)

“Dead Inside” is a song by English rock band Muse. The opening track on their seventh album, Drones, it was released as the album’s lead single on 23 March 2015.[3] On the same day, a lyric video for the song was released on the band’s YouTube channel, while the single premiered on BBC Radio 1.[4]

Placing the song within the album’s context, Matthew Bellamy said: “This is where the story of the album begins, where the protagonist loses hope and becomes ‘Dead Inside’, therefore vulnerable to the dark forces introduced in ‘Psycho’ and which ensue over the next few songs on the album, before eventually defecting, revolting and overcoming these dark forces later in the story”.[3]

Citizen Erased

“Citizen Erased” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse from their second studio album Origin of Symmetry. The track is 7 minutes and 21 seconds long, making it the second longest single track in Muse’s discography behind “The Globalist”, the eleventh track from the band’s seventh studio album Drones, and fourth longest piece. The song has a synthesized ending that leads straight into the next track on the album, “Micro Cuts”. The song has long been a fan favourite, and in July 2007, a Muse fan site, Muselive.com, launched a campaign[1] to get it into the singles charts through various download sources. The track managed to get to number 1 on the British download company 7digital’s charts, but failed to make it into the official UK Top 40. It did, however, chart at #122.[2] On 9 December 2010 in Sydney, Australia, Bellamy temporarily changed “Citizen Erased” to “Citizen Arrested” as a response to the Australian founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange’s, arrest in Sweden regarding alleged sexual offences.

Cave (song)

“Cave” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, released as the second single from their 1999 debut album Showbiz.

Bellamy has given two statements about what “Cave” is about. Once he said it was about “an old friend of mine” in a strangely warbled voice before a live performance of the song and on a different occasion he stated “The idea for Cave came from that rubbish American book, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus. There’s this bit about how men go into a cave when they get stressed and I think that’s probably true, although, personally, I tend to let it out. I did have a bit of a tantrum in my hotel bathroom last night – but I managed to repair the toilet, so that’s OK.”[citation needed]

“Cave” was released on 6 September 1999 on 7″ vinyl—backed with an instrumental remix of the song—and double CD—backed with a remix of the song alongside “Twin”, “Host” and “Coma”;—on 6 September 1999. It reached number 52 in the UK Singles Chart[1]—an improvement of 21 positions on “Uno”. In the United States a five-track extended play was also released by Maverick Records. “Cave” also appears on the soundtrack for the film Little Nicky.

Butterflies and Hurricanes

“Butterflies and Hurricanes” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse from their third studio album, Absolution, and was the last single released from the album. It was one of two songs recorded with a studio orchestra during the initial stages of production. The song is also notable for its Rachmaninoff-esque piano interlude.

The title and theme were mainly inspired by the butterfly effect of chaos theory. The theory describes how even the smallest of changes in present conditions, like the flapping of a butterfly’s wings, can cause a chain reaction and have a significant effect in the future, like a hurricane.

The song was also dedicated to Dominic Howard’s father, who died shortly after the band’s performance at the Glastonbury Festival.[1]

Bliss (Muse song)

“Bliss” is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, released on 20 August 2001 as the third single from their second studio album Origin of Symmetry (2001).

“Bliss” is an electronic rock[citation needed] song that moves at a tempo of 129 bpm. The song opens and ends with piano arpeggios, with the majority of the song driven by bass and synth. Bellamy’s vocal lines in the song span from F3 to E5, except for live performances, where he hits a G5 in the final chorus. The song is written in the key of C minor and modulates to the parallel major key during the chorus.

Matthew Bellamy has said “Bliss” is his favourite song “because it’s got all these 80s arpeggios and keyboards on it which remind me of some music I heard on some children’s music programme when I was five. I think I ripped it off that. And that reminds me of when I was a bit simpler, a bit more of a pleasant state.”[1]

Assassin (Muse song)

“Assassin” is a song by English Band Muse released on their 2006 album Black Holes and Revelations. The song peaked at number 6 on 7digital’s charts in the final week of 2006.[3]

During recording, the bass drum had a “few” extra microphones, to capture the “most definition possible”. These microphones for the bass drum included one inside the drum and two outside. Capacitor microphones were used for the snare drums.

The song is featured on the video game Guitar Hero World Tour.

Apocalypse Please

“Apocalypse Please”, also known as “Emergency”,[1][2][3] is a song by English alternative rock band Muse, featured on their 2003 third studio album Absolution. Written by lead vocalist, guitarist and pianist Matthew Bellamy, a live version of the song was released as a digital download single on 23 August 2004, from which approximately 70% of all proceeds were donated to Oxfam.[4] The song reached number ten on the first edition of the UK Official Download Chart, announced on 1 September 2004.[5]

Animals (Muse song)

“Animals” is a song by English rock band Muse. It is the seventh track on their sixth studio album, The 2nd Law (2012). A music video for the song was released on 22 April 2013, which was fan-created during an open competition to create a music video for the song. The song had a positive reception from music critics.

“Animals”, which is performed mainly in a 5/4 time signature,[1][2] features a fast tempo of 170 beats per minute[2] with multiple guitar riffs throughout the song as well as a short guitar solo and a climactic ending.[3][4] The ending also features samples of Wall Street trading floors.[5] According to NME, the song depicts deteriorating economies under weight of “stock market savagery, industries desperate to ‘advertise, franchise…, kill the competition’, and the greed of bankers.”[6] Band drummer Dominic Howard described the song as The 2nd Law’s most political song, aimed at the bankers and people “who gambled everyone’s money and ended up putting countries in debt.”[7]

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