eurohitlist.eu

XXL (Mylène Farmer song)

“XXL” is a 1995 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. The song was the lead single from her fourth studio album Anamorphosée and was released on 19 September 1995. It marked an important change in the singer’s career, with more rock sonorities, easier lyrics to understand and a music video directed by a new producer. Although it entered directly to number-one on the French Singles Chart, it dropped quickly and achieved mixed success.

Tristana (song)

“Tristana” is a 1987 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. Fourth single from her first studio album Cendres de Lune, the song was released in February 1987. As for the previous single “Libertine”, the music video was produced as a film, with many extras and a huge budget. First song entirely written by the singer herself, it enjoyed an intense promotion on television and met a great success in France, reaching the top ten.

Remember the day

“Souviens-toi du jour” (English: “Remember the Day”) is a 1999 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was the third single from her fifth studio album Innamoramento and was released on 2 September 1999. Inspired by Primo Levi’s book If This Is a Man, the song deals with the theme of the Holocaust. The song is perhaps best remembered for its controversial music video, which was generally viewed as disrespectful towards its own subject matter.

Be me – Be Me

“Sois moi – Be Me” is a 2011 song of French-Canadian singer and songwriter Mylène Farmer, with music by Laurent Boutonnat. It was published on her second best-of 2001.2011, issued on 5 December 2011. Alongside “Du temps”, “Sois moi – Be Me” was one of the two then unreleased songs from the album. The song poorly charted in France, peaking at number 57, and generally received negative reviews from both critics and Farmer’s fans.

On 30 November 2011, six days before the compilation album’s release, the song leaked on one of the singer’s fan site.[1]
“Sois moi – Be Me” is an uptempo electropop song,[2] with two verses dealing with the themes of madness, sexuality and melancholy, and a chorus only composed of the words ‘Be me oh-oh!’.[3] Before the second verse, Farmer can be heard moaning in a sexual manner.

If I had at least …

“Si j’avais au moins…” (English: “If I Had at Least…”) is a song recorded by French singer Mylène Farmer. This pop rock ballad was written by Farmer with music composed by Laurent Boutonnat. It was the third single released, from her seventh studio album Point de suture (2008), on 16 February 2009. Directed by Bruno Aveillan, the accompanying music video is the continuation of Farmer’s previous single “Dégénération” and is the last part of a short film called The Farmer Project, broadcast in January 2009. In the video, the singer portrays a supernatural character who saves animals from testing and heals them. Although a survey showed that a minority of the voters wanted the song as the third single, “Si j’avais au moins…” received positive reviews and achieved some success on the French Singles Chart, debuting at number-one. Farmer performed the song on television during the NRJ Music Awards show on 17 January 2009 and on the 2009 Mylène Farmer en tournée tour.

Sextonik

“Sextonik” is a 2008 song recorded by French singer Mylène Farmer. It is the fifth single from her seventh studio album Point de suture and was released on 31 August 2009. Despite being less successful than Farmer’s previous hit singles from the album, it allowed her to beat her own record for the artist with the most number one hits in France.

Since the release of the album Point de Suture, the song has been mentioned in media, and particularly Public, as its deals with a sexual issue.[1]

Without Logic

“Sans logique” (English: “Without Logic”) is a 1988 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was released on 20 February 1989 as the fourth and last single from her second studio album Ainsi soit je…. The song deals with schizophrenia, death, love and religion and was accompanied by a cinematic video which shows a human corrida. The single became a top ten hit in France.

After the successful songs ” Without counterfeiting ” and ” Provided they are sweet ” and the huge sales of the album Parent Amen … I , Farmer Decided to release “No Logic” as the fourth and last single from the album have She was prepaid her first concert ride through France, Belgium and Switzerland. [1] The B-side of the single, “Last Smile”, is a Previously unavailable song about the death of a relative (though a live version of the cover ” I so want you to understand, “Originally sung by Marie Laforet , Was first scheduled as the B-side). [2]

no infringement

“Sans contrefaçon” (“Without Forgery/Counterfeit”) is a 1987 song recorded by French artist Mylène Farmer. It was released on 16 October 1987 as the first single from her second studio album, Ainsi soit je…. It was a big hit in 1987 and is one of her three best-selling singles. It became a very popular song in France over the years and has been covered by many artists. A remixed version by the DJ J.C.A. was released on 5 August 2003 as the first single from the compilation album called RemixeS.

Dreaming

“Rêver” (English: “Dreaming”) is a 1995 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was the fifth single from her fourth album Anamorphosée and was released on 16 November 1996. In spite of moderate sales and chart performances, the song remains one of the most known by the general public because of the subjects it deals with, namely the Holocaust[citation needed] and a call for tolerance.

Initially, only four singles from the studio album Anamorphosée were scheduled. However, because of the fall of Farmer during a concert in Lyon on 15 June 1996, the song “Rêver” was chosen as the fifth single in order to make the fans wait, since the release of the live album would be deferred.[1]

The single was released only as CD, and there was no vinyl. On the single cover, Farmer is kneeling, completely naked while showing modesty, which seems to be paradoxal.[2] The digipack version of the CD maxi contains a new remix of “XXL”. The second track of the CD single is the live version of the song. As for the single remix (‘stripped dream remix’), it was produced by Laurent Boutonnat.[1]

Regrets (song)

“Regrets” is a 1991 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer as duet with musician Jean-Louis Murat. The song was released on 29 July 1989 and was the second single from her third studio album L’Autre…. The music video was shot in a cemetery in Budapest, as the song deals with a love relationship between two people separated by the death of one of them. This ballad became a top three hit in France and was also successful in Belgium.

Give me back

“Redonne-moi” (English: “Give Me Back”) is a 2005 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. This pop ballad was the third single from her sixth studio album, Avant que l’ombre…, and was released on 2 January 2006. Like all other tracks of the parent album, it was written by Farmer and the music was composed by Laurent Boutonnat. The song has poetic lyrics and a melancholy music, and is about death, memory, and hope. About three months before the release, Farmer exceptionally accepted to perform the song in a television show, which she did not for other singles from Avant que l’ombre…. The accompanying music video, filmed by François Hanss and broadcast from 11 January 2006, shows Farmer singing in a sculpture workshop. In spite of being a top ten hit in France, “Redonne-moi” became the less-selling single from the album, with rather disappointing sales figures.

My heart loose

“Que mon cœur lâche” is a 1992 song recorded by the French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. The single was released on 23 November 1992 to promote Farmer’s compilation album Dance Remixes. Farmer also recorded an English-language version of the track, entitled “My Soul Is Slashed” which was released in May 1993. Originally recorded as a charity single, the song deals with AIDS and caused some controversy as lyrics seem to encourage the rejection of condoms. Produced as a short film, the music video was directed by the French film director Luc Besson, and features Farmer as an angel sent to Earth by God. The song reached the top ten in France and Belgium.

Q.I (song)

“Q.I” (English: “IQ”) is a 2005 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was the second single from her sixth studio album, Avant que l’ombre…, and was released on 4 July 2005. Like all other tracks from the album, the lyrics were written by Farmer and the music was composed by Laurent Boutonnat. The primary meaning of the song is the attraction to one’s partner’s intelligence, but the lyrics are ambiguous enough to allow a more sexual interpretation. The accompanying music video was filmed by Benoît Lestang in Budapest and starred Rafael Amargo and Farmer, performing soft erotic scenes in a bedroom; however, the video was not well received. Variously received by the media, the song became a top ten hit in France and Belgium (Wallonia).

Provided they are soft

” Provided they are sweet ” French pronunciation: [puʁvy kɛl due swa] (English: “As Long as They’re Soft”) is a 1988 synthpop song by the French artist Mylène Farmer . Third single from her second studio album Amen I … , It was released on 12 September 1988. The long version is provocative music video, and contains various sexual scenes. It Achieved great success in France, Becoming Farmer’s first number-one hit.

Keep Growing

“Plus grandir” (English: “Keep Growing”) is a 1985 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer and is the first song written by the singer. It was released twice: first, on 25 September 1985 in a studio version as second single from Farmer’s debut album Cendres de Lune, then on 12 May 1990 in a live mix version as second single from the live album En Concert. In spite of positive critics and a music video produced as a short film in cinemascope, the song achieved moderate success in France in terms of sales and chart performances.

Maybe you

“Peut-être toi” (English: “Maybe You”) is a 2005 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. It was the fifth single from her sixth studio album, Avant que l’ombre…, and was released on 21 August 2006. The music video was produced as an animated feature and the lyrics deals with a love relationship. It was a top three hit in France, but its sales were rather modest.

In May 2005, the fans were disappointed when “Q.I” was chosen as the second single, as “Peut-être toi” was already broadcast on radio and then seemed to be a next single.[1] Later, as of 22 May 2006, a rumor announced “Dans les rues de Londres” as the fifth single from the album.[2] However, on 16 June 2006, it was officially announced that “Peut-être toi” would be the fifth and last single from Avant que l’ombre….

The song was broadcast for the first time in its radio edit version on 19 June on NRJ. On 26 June, the first remix, called the Miss Farmer’s remix, was presented but not played. On 6 July, both versions – the radio edit and the Miss Farmer’s remix – were available on digital download websites. Twenty-one days later, the second remix – Cox’s remix -, was officially announced. The single was eventually released on 21 August, in three limited editions: CD single, CD maxi et 12″ vinyl.[3] The first remix was produced by Bionix, who also produced one of them for “L’amour n’est rien…”, and the two others were made by Chris Cox who also remixed “Désenchantée” and “Q.I”.[4]
“Peut-être toi” was performed during the 2006 Farmer’s tour as the first song of the concert, and thus it is available on the live album Avant que l’ombre… à Bercy.

Forgive me (Mylène Farmer Song)

“Pardonne-moi” (English: “Forgive Me”) is a 2001 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer, with lyrics written by herself and music composed by Laurent Boutonnat. It was the third and last single from Les Mots, and was released on 21 October 2002. The song is about the unhappy love of a woman who is asking for forgiveness from the Oriental princes whom she loves. The black and white accompanying music video was directed by Boutonnat in Morocco and shows Farmer dressed as a nun, with images of a knight galloping on horseback and a snake. Like the single “À quoi je sers…” released thirteen years earlier, “Pardonne-moi” is generally deemed a synthesis of Farmer’s work and thus marked the end of an artistic period in her career. The song received positive reviews from critics and became a top ten hit in France and in the Waloon Belgium, although its sales were rather disappointing.

Yes but no

“Oui mais… non” (English: “Yes But… No”) is a 2010 song by French pop musician Mylène Farmer. It is the leading single to her eighth studio album Bleu Noir, released in December 2010. The single was released to radio stations on 29 September, then available for pre-order on 11 October in the digital music market, and on 29 November in CD single. The lyrics written by Farmer and the music composed by RedOne. Unlike all of her previous tracks, Laurent Boutonnat was not involved in the song’s production or composition.[1]

Optimistic Me

“Optimistique-moi” (English: “Optimistic Me”) is a 1999 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. The fourth single from her fifth studio album, Innamoramento, it was released on 22 February 2000. Dealing with parental relationships, the song enjoyed many remixes and formats and achieved success in France where it reached number seven.

The song was one of the most anticipated singles by Farmer’s fans, mostly because it was the first one to be fully composed, i.e. lyrics and music, by the singer.[1] A promotional envelope, limited to 150 copies, was sent to radio stations, but several of them were stolen within the recording company, generating a judicial inquiry. As consequence, the release on radio originally scheduled for 4 January 2000 was delayed to 11 January.[2] A new promotional format, a white CD single, was sent in turn to radio stations. The release of the formats was made in two times : first, the CD single and a CD maxi on 22 February 2000, then another CD maxi and the vinyl on 7 March. Unlike her previous singles, “Optimistique-moi” was released under two different digipacks for the remixes, which certainly helped to increase the single’s sales (nine years later, “C’est dans l’air” had also two CD maxi). For the first time in the singer’s career, the song was remixed in the U.S. where it was released in underground clubs, with only the words “MF”, which allowed the artist’s name to remain undisclosed;[3] however, these remixes were also available in France. Regularly aired on radio in the single version, but also in the ‘opti-mystic radio mix’ on Europe 2, the song also enjoyed commercial ads on television (since 23 February on M6), and radios (since 18 February on NRJ).[1]

We are all fools

“On est tous des imbéciles” (English: “We Are All Fools”) is a 1984 song recorded by French artist Mylène Farmer. It was released in February 1985 as her second single after “Maman a tort” and its English-translated version “My Mum Is Wrong”. Although the song was provocative and rather critical of show business, it was often well received in the media. However, in spite of good reviews and an intense promotion on television by the singer, the sales of the single were disappointing.

Monkey Me (song)

“Monkey Me” is a 2012 song by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer with music by Laurent Boutonnat. It was the third single from her ninth studio album, Monkey Me, and was released on radio on 30 August 2013, then physically on 7 October of the same year. A music video composed of graphics was available on the web four days earlier. The song was generally well received by critics and the singer’s fans who considered it one of the best tracks of the album. In France, it peaked at number three on the week of the release of the physical formats.

Mom is wrong

“Maman a tort” is a 1984 song recorded by French artist Mylène Farmer. It was the debut single from Farmer’s first studio album Cendres de Lune, and marked the beginning of her collaboration with her long-time composer, Laurent Boutonnat. With lyrics by Jérôme Dahan, who also helped compose the song with Boutonnat, the song was first released in March 1984. An English-language version, titled “My Mum Is Wrong” and produced by F. R. David, was released in September 1984. “Maman a tort” was deemed as provocative at the time, as its ambiguous lyrics seem to deal with a lesbian love; similarly, the video, which shows Farmer lightly dressed, was often censored on television when it was released. Generally well received by critics, the original French version of the song achieved modest success in comparison with the singer’s next singles, while the English-language version was a commercial failure. The song did, however, allow Farmer to launch her singing career and establish her particular artistic style.

Mad World

“Mad World” is a 1982 song by the British band Tears for Fears. Written by Roland Orzabal and sung by bassist Curt Smith, it was the band’s third single release and first chart hit, reaching number 3 on the UK Singles Chart in November 1982. Both “Mad World” and its B-side, “Ideas as Opiates”, appeared on the band’s debut LP The Hurting (1983).

“Mad World” has since been covered by various artists, most notably by Michael Andrews and Gary Jules for the soundtrack of the film Donnie Darko in 2001. This version was a UK number one hit and won Orzabal his second Ivor Novello Award in 2003.[3]

Lonely Lisa

“Lonely Lisa” is a 2010 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It is the third single from her 2010 eighth album Bleu Noir and was released digitally on 16 May 2011, then it was released physically on 5 July. As “Oui mais… non”, the lead single from the album, The lyrics were written by Farmer with the music composed by RedOne. The song title comes from a female character created by Farmer which was already used in her 2002 music video for “C’est une belle journée” and served as trademark for one of her commercial companies. Musically, the song has electro and dance sonorities. It was generally praised in the media and reached number-one on the French Singles Chart.

Libertine (song)

“Libertine” French pronunciation: [libɛʁtin]is a 1986 song recorded by French artist Mylène Farmer. It was the third single from her first studio album Cendres de lune and was released on 1 April 1986. It was particularly known for its huge music video, produced as a film and which contains explicit sexual and violent scenes. It met success on the French chart, becoming thus Farmer’s first big hit. In 2002, the song was successfully covered by Kate Ryan, who reached the top 20 in several European countries.

Les Mots (song)

“Les Mots” (English: “The Words”) is a 2001 song recorded as a duet by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer and English soul singer Seal. It was the first single from her best of, Les Mots, and was released on 13 November 2001. It was Farmer’s third duet, after those with Jean-Louis Murat in 1991 and Khaled in 1997, and her first international duet. In addition, “Les Mots” is a bilingual song, containing verses in French (sung by Farmer) and in English (by Seal). In terms of sales, “Les Mots” is Farmer’s fourth biggest success in France, behind “Désenchantée”, “Pourvu qu’elles soient douces” and “Sans contrefaçon”.

What I use …

“À quoi je sers…” (English: “What good am I…”) is a 1989 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. The single was a new song when it was released in July 1989, being not available on Farmer’s studio albums, but only in a live version on En Concert. Marking the end of Farmer’s first period of work, it hit a moderate success in France.

In May 1989, Farmer began her first tour throughout France, which was a great success. Farmer would probably wrote the lyrics of “À quoi je sers…” during this tour, as she was incredibly surprised by her success on stage and she expressed doubts about the direction of her musical career.[1] The singer and her partner Laurent Boutonnat decided to record this song as new single, with another unpublished song on the B-side, “La Veuve noire”, whose music is very similar to that of “À quoi je sers…”. Both songs were recorded fairly quickly. However, due to the success of the previous single “Sans logique”, “À quoi je sers…” was not released before July 1989. Little broadcast on radio, the song appeared as a synthesis of the singer’s work and marked the end of the first period of Farmer’s career.[2]

Doll makes no

“La Poupée qui fait non” (English: “The Doll That Says No”) is a 1966 song written by Franck Gérald (lyrics) and French singer/songwriter Michel Polnareff (music). It was recorded by Polnareff, becoming an immediate success in France and one of Polnareff most definitive songs. Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin/Yardbirds) played guitar on the recording[citation needed].

Polnareff also made language versions of the song in German (“Meine Puppe sagt non”), Italian (“Una bambolina che fa no, no, no”), and Spanish (“Muñeca que hace no”) which helped the song get airplay all over Europe and become hits in language versions by local artists in 1966.

There have been tens of covers of the song in English and various languages in the following decades. Polnareff’s version from the album Live at the Roxy was also released as a single in 1996, exactly 30 years from the original.

L’Instant X

“L’Instant X” (English: “The X Moment”) is a 1995 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. It was the second single from her fourth album Anamorphosée and was released on 12 December 1995. Directed by Marcus Nispel in New York, the music video depicts with humour the apocalypse and shows Farmer bathing in the foam. The song became the biggest hit from the album, reaching number six in France, with a long chart trajectory. In January 2004, the song was the subject of a remix produced by One-T and was released as promotional single.

The story of a fairy is …

“L’Histoire d’une fée, c’est…” (English: “The Story of a Fairy Is…”) is a 2001 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was one of the singles from the soundtrack album for the film Rugrats in Paris: The Movie (known in France as Les Razmokets à Paris). Written by Farmer, with music composed by her long-time songwriting collaborator Laurent Boutonnat, the song was released on 27 February 2001. The song deals with Melusine the fairy’s life, with lyrics which seem to be innocent and childish but in fact use many double entendres and puns which refer to sexual practices. Although it had no promotion from the singer, no music video and no regular broadcast on radio, the song managed to reach the top ten in France and in Belgium.

Doll makes no

“La Poupée qui fait non” (English: “The Doll That Says No”) is a 1966 song written by Franck Gérald (lyrics) and French singer/songwriter Michel Polnareff (music). It was recorded by Polnareff, becoming an immediate success in France and one of Polnareff most definitive songs. Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin/Yardbirds) played guitar on the recording[citation needed].

Polnareff also made language versions of the song in German (“Meine Puppe sagt non”), Italian (“Una bambolina che fa no, no, no”), and Spanish (“Muñeca que hace no”) which helped the song get airplay all over Europe and become hits in language versions by local artists in 1966.

There have been tens of covers of the song in English and various languages in the following decades. Polnareff’s version from the album Live at the Roxy was also released as a single in 1996, exactly 30 years from the original.

We are all fools

“On est tous des imbéciles” (English: “We Are All Fools”) is a 1984 song recorded by French artist Mylène Farmer. It was released in February 1985 as her second single after “Maman a tort” and its English-translated version “My Mum Is Wrong”. Although the song was provocative and rather critical of show business, it was often well received in the media. However, in spite of good reviews and an intense promotion on television by the singer, the sales of the single were disappointing.

Love is nothing…

“L’amour n’est rien…” (English: “Love Is Nothing…”) is a 2005 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. The song was released as the fourth single from Farmer’s sixth studio album Avant que l’ombre… on 27 March 2006. “L’Amour n’est rien…” was illustrated by a music video which was perhaps one of the simplest in singer’s career, and in which she performs a striptease. The song had some success in France, where it reached the top ten, but was especially successful in Russia where it was often aired on the radio.

Soul-stram-gram

“L’Âme-stram-gram” is a 1999 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was the lead single from her fifth studio album Innamoramento and was released on 9 March 1999. The lyrics were written by Farmer and the music was composed by Laurent Boutonnat. Musically, the song has techno and dance sonorities which marked an artistic change in the singer’s career, although the rest of the album contains more pop songs. Based on a famous children’s counting rhyme, the song is primarily about confidence, secret, and confession and uses the lexical field of psychoanalysis; however, the many puns and double entendres can also provide another meaning explicitly referring to sexuality.

Inspired by the romantic comedy horror film A Chinese Ghost Story, the expensive eight-minute music video was shot by Hong Kong film director Ching Siu-Tung in Beijing and displays Farmer portraying twin sisters who have supernatural powers; the first being kidnapped by Chinese bandits and rescued by her sister, who dies in the process, causing the first twin to commit suicide. Farmer promoted the song by performing it on three TV shows and then singing it on two of her subsequent tours. The single peaked at number two in France and was certified as silver for having over 125,000 sales. It was also a top ten hit in Belgium (Wallonia).

I give you back your love

“Je te rends ton amour” (English: “I’m Giving You Your Love Back”) is a 1999 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. The second single from her fifth studio album Innamoramento, it was released on 8 June 1999. The song became another top 10 hit in France for Farmer, and its controversial music video gained considerable attention at the time, being censored by several television channels.

After the release of “L’Âme-stram-gram”, rumours announced “Dessine-moi un mouton” as second single from Innamoramento, with a video inspired by Antoine de Saint Exupéry’s Le Petit Prince, featuring the crash of an airplane. However, Farmer decided to release her favorite song of the album, “Je te rends ton amour”, instead.[1] This song, whose music was composed by Laurent Boutonnat primarily for Nathalie Cardone,[2] enabled the album to remain in the top of the charts during the 1999 summer.[3][4]

The single was released in various formats providing a new song, “Effets secondaires”, as well as two remixes produced by Perky Park. The image used for various covers, made by Marino Parisotto Vay, shows Farmer being crucified.[5] The designer Henry Neu said to be particularly proud of having made the velvet envelope containing a promotional cross-shaped CD.[6]

I tell you everything

“Je te dis tout” is a song by French singer songwriter Mylène Farmer. This ballad was written by Farmer with music composed by Laurent Boutonnat. It was the second single from her ninth studio album Monkey Me (2012), and was first released digitally on 28 January 2013, then will be released physically on 4 March 2013. The music video was directed by François Hanss.

On 24 January 2013, it was said that “Je te dis tout” would be the second single from the Monkey Me album.[1] An one-minute shortened version of the song was sent to radios in a promotional CD displaying a big red “M” in the center of the cover.[2] The song was available on digital platforms on 28 January 2013.[3] On 20 April 2013, 1,000 units of a picture disc CD were available for sale (although units numbered over 1,000 were sold) in 170 independent record stores throughout France.[4]

Alongside “Quand”, “Je te dis tout” is one of the two ballads on the album.[5] The song deals with the absolute love;[6] Farmer, the writer, is very explicit in the lyrics that sound like a declaration of love as she had rarely sung in the past.[5]

I love you melancholy

“Je t’aime mélancolie” (English: “I Love You Melancholy”) is a 1991 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. The song was released as the third single from her third studio album L’Autre…, in December 1991. Characterized by its gloomy lyrics and its music video shot on a boxing ring, it achieved success, becoming a top ten hit in France and Belgium.

In late 1991 “No doubt” was Chosen to be the third single from The Other … . HOWEVER, “I love you melancholy” was finally released INSTEAD. At the time, a fan from Nancy Who wanted to meet Farmer killed the receptionist of Polydor , her recording company in Paris , _him_ shooting with a rifle Because He refused to give _him_ the singer’s address. After this tragedy, Farmer Went into exile in the US . [1]

The single was released in France and Germany, and for the first time, among the formats available for the single, there was a voluminous promotional object, namely a carton pyramid containing the visual of the 12″ maxi with at its base the promotional CD in a digipack case. The four 1991 remixes were all produced by Thierry Rogen. The radio stations aired one of these remixed versions, shorter, instead of the single version. The song was eventually released on 15 December 1991, including as CD maxi which contained a then unreleased song entitled “Mylène Is Calling”.[2]

In 2003, the song was remixed by the famous DJ Felix Da Housecat for the remixes compilation RemixeS. This version was even released as a second single from this album in November that year; it was not aired on radio but was successful in nightclubs.

Falling in Love (song)

“Innamoramento” is a 1999 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was the fifth single from her fifth studio album, Innamoramento, and was released on 18 July 2000. This pop ballad was written by Farmer with the music composed by Laurent Boutonnat. Lyrically, the song is about the need of love, and was accompanied by a music video directed by François Hanss which displays alternatively images of the singer on stage during her 1999 tour and in the Bois de Vincennes. “Innamoramento” received positive reviews from critics who generally praised the quality of the remixes and the concept of the music video. The song became Farmer’s 20th top ten hit in France, reaching number three in the first week of release; however, the song was the less-selling single from the album.

I Want You to Want Me

“I Want You to Want Me” is a song by the American rock band Cheap Trick from their second album In Color, released in September 1977. It was the first single released from that album, but it did not chart in the United States.

“I Want You to Want Me” was a number-one single in Japan.[2][3] Its success in Japan, as well as the success of its preceding single “Clock Strikes Ten” paved the way for Cheap Trick’s concerts at Nippon Budokan in Tokyo in April 1978 that were recorded for the group’s most popular album, Cheap Trick at Budokan.[4] A live version of “I Want You to Want Me” from the album Cheap Trick at Budokan was released in 1979 and became their biggest selling single, reaching #7 on the Billboard Hot 100.[5] It was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America, representing sales of one million records. In Canada, it reached #2 in on the RPM national singles chart, remaining there for two weeks[6] and was certified Gold for the sale of 5,000 singles in September 1979.[7] It was also the band’s highest charting single in Britain, where it reached #29.

Cheap Trick bass player Tom Petersson told Classic Rock magazine:

“My recollection is that [songwriter Rick Nielsen] did that song as a bit of a joke, because at the time when we had done that song there was a lot of pop music on the radio—ABBA, and all sorts of things, disco, [Rick thought] ‘I’m just going to do an over-the-top pop song. I just want to do one that’s so silly—total pop—and then we’ll do a heavy version of it.’ He didn’t know what was going to happen with it. The idea was to have it like a heavy metal pop song. Cheap Trick doing ABBA—except a very heavy version.”[citation needed]

Rick Nielsen explains his perspective behind the song:

“I just pictured myself in a big, overstuffed chair, and my dad turned on the TV; there were like three stations. I wanted to watch Gabby Hayes – he was a cowboy. I always wanted what wasn’t there, so I think that’s what made me inquisitive throughout my whole life. When you wanted Gabby, Gabby’s not there; when you want your dad, your dad is not there. It was the easiest lyric I could think of. And I wish I were that stupid more often. It’s like Van Morrison – with some of his old songs it didn’t matter what the lyrics meant, it’s how they sounded.”[citation needed]

Years later, Nielsen and Petersson criticized the lightweight production of “I Want You to Want Me” as it originally appeared on their second album, In Color. Cheap Trick went as far as to mostly re-record that album in 1998. Producer Tom Werman explains:

“‘I Want You To Want Me’ was a fabulous dancehall type of song, and a perfect pop tune, and it was meant to be a little campy. I put the piano on—a guy named Jai Winding played it. I remember asking the band what they thought of it, and Rick Nielsen kind of shrugged and said, ‘You’re the producer.'” Further: “It was a burlesque song, like a 30’s number. That is what they wrote it as.”[citation needed]

Fuck Them All

“Fuck Them All” is a 2005 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. Released on 14 March 2005, it was the lead single from her sixth studio album, Avant que l’ombre…. Like all tracks from the album, the lyrics were written by the singer with music composed by Laurent Boutonnat. “Fuck Them All” combines pop music elements with acoustic guitar, electronic beats and synths, with a musical bridge sung as a rap in English. As a result, it is often compared to Madonna’s early 2000s songs. Using both crude and colorful lyrics, including sex and vulgarity, the song deals with the war between the sexes and was often considered a feminist plea in which women are presented as warriors.

The accompanying music video for the song, filmed by Agustí Villaronga in Romania over two days, shows Farmer portraying two women in a warehouse and many scarecrows made by Swiss artist Martial Leiter. Displaying many symbolic elements, it was the subject of many analyses on the Internet and in the press which generally praised its aesthetic qualities, but criticized for its lack of innovation. Farmer sang “Fuck Them All” during her 2006 series of concert at Bercy and the performance was released on the Avant que l’ombre… à Bercy DVD.

The song received a mixed critical reception from fans and the general public, reviews ranging from “unconvincing” and “vulgar” to “bold” and “catchy”. Despite this, the song was downloaded over 5,000 times from official download platforms during its first week of release, and over one million times illegally[citation needed]. It met some success on the French and Belgian (Wallonia) charts, where it reached number two and eventually became the album’s best-selling single. In France, it earned a silver disc for over 100,000 units sold.

I give you back your love

“Je te rends ton amour” (English: “I’m Giving You Your Love Back”) is a 1999 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. The second single from her fifth studio album Innamoramento, it was released on 8 June 1999. The song became another top 10 hit in France for Farmer, and its controversial music video gained considerable attention at the time, being censored by several television channels.

After the release of “L’Âme-stram-gram”, rumours announced “Dessine-moi un mouton” as second single from Innamoramento, with a video inspired by Antoine de Saint Exupéry’s Le Petit Prince, featuring the crash of an airplane. However, Farmer decided to release her favorite song of the album, “Je te rends ton amour”, instead.[1] This song, whose music was composed by Laurent Boutonnat primarily for Nathalie Cardone,[2] enabled the album to remain in the top of the charts during the 1999 summer.[3][4]

The single was released in various formats providing a new song, “Effets secondaires”, as well as two remixes produced by Perky Park. The image used for various covers, made by Marino Parisotto Vay, shows Farmer being crucified.[5] The designer Henry Neu said to be particularly proud of having made the velvet envelope containing a promotional cross-shaped CD.[6]

Time (Mylène Farmer)

“Du temps” is a 2011 dance-pop song by French singer Mylène Farmer. It was written by Farmer with a music composed by Laurent Boutonnat.[1] The song is the first single from her second best of 2001.2011 and was released first digitally on 7 November 2011.[2] The song was generally well received by critics, but divided Farmer’s fans.

The promotional art cover was shown on the Internet on 2 November,[3] and a 30-second excerpt was available to listen on the digital platforms, including amazon.fr.[4] On 6 November, the full song was available on the Charts in France site, but was removed after a request by Universal Music.[5] The music video for the song was scheduled to be released in the mid-November.[6]

As written on the back of the cover, the painting on the front was made by Farmer.[7]

Draw me a sheep

“Dessine-moi un mouton” (English: “Draw Me a Sheep”) is a 1999 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer, first in a studio version, then in a live version during her 1999 concert Mylenium Tour. The song was the only single from her third live album Mylenium Tour and was released on 5 December 2000. The title draws from a direct quotation to a well-known scene in French children’s book Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupéry. Although it was generally appreciated by critics and was a top ten hit in France, it had moderate success in terms of sales.

Undress me

“Déshabillez-moi” (English: “Undress Me”) is a 1967 song first recorded by French singer Juliette Gréco, by Patti Layne in 1987, then by Mylène Farmer in a studio version in 1988 and in a live version during her 2006 concerts at Bercy (Paris). This live version was the second single from Farmer’s fourth live album, Avant que l’ombre… à Bercy, and was released on 5 March 2007. Although it was a top ten hit in France, it achieved moderate success in terms of sales and chart performances.

disenchanted

“Désenchantée” (pronounced: [dezɑ̃ʃɑ̃te]; English: “Disenchanted”) is a 1991 song recorded by the French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. First single from her third studio album L’Autre…, it was released on 18 March 1991 and achieved great success in France, topping the charts for more than two months. It was Farmer’s most successful song and is generally considered her signature song.
In 2002, the song was successfully covered by Kate Ryan, who reached number one in Belgium.

without logic

“Sans logique” (English: “Without Logic”) is a 1988 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was released on 20 February 1989 as the fourth and last single from her second studio album Ainsi soit je…. The song deals with schizophrenia, death, love and religion and was accompanied by a cinematic video which shows a human corrida. The single became a top ten hit in France.

After the successful songs ” Without counterfeiting ” and ” Provided they are sweet ” and the huge sales of the album Parent Amen … I , Farmer Decided to release “No Logic” as the fourth and last single from the album have She was prepaid her first concert ride through France, Belgium and Switzerland. [1] The B-side of the single, “Last Smile”, is a Previously unavailable song about the death of a relative (though a live version of the cover ” I so want you to understand, “Originally sung by Marie Laforet , Was first scheduled as the B-side). [2]

“Sans logique” was actually recorded twice due to technical problems in the studio. The sentence “this is a blank formatted diskette” (sampled from an Ensoniq Mirage), which can be heard in the introduction of the song and later on, refers to this problem and was kept in the finished product.[1] “Sans logique” was widely played on French radio during the year of its release[2] was one of the top ten songs that yielded the most copyright royalties to the Société des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique in 1989.[3]

Shortly after the single’s release, the European Workers Party used a photo from the video, where Farmer has white eyes and the horns on her head, with the subtitle “These artists who promote drugs and the ugliness”. Farmer sued the secretary of the party, Jacques Cheminade, accusing him of having used her image without her consent and have made inappropriate and abusive remarks towards her. The Tribunal de grande instance de Paris found in Farmer’s favour.[1][4]

Degeneration

“Dégénération” (English: “Degeneration”) is a 2008 song by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was the first single from her seventh studio album Point de Suture, and was released first digitally and on radio in June 2008, then in a CD in August 2008. The song marked an important musical change in the singer’s career. Despite cold critical and public reception, the single achieved success, peaking at number one in France on both physical and digital sales charts.

it hurts so much

“Comme j’ai mal” (English: “How Much I Suffer”) is a 1995 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. Fourth single from her fourth album Anamorphosée, it was released on 1 July 1996. It was a relative failure: indeed, it failed to reach the top ten in France and was the least-selling single from the album.

In June 1996, Farmer continued her concert tour through France that she had begun on 25 May, while her fourth studio album Anamorphosée was a success despite a lack of promotion. However, on 15 June, the singer fell at her concert in Lyon and broke her wrist, forcing her to stop her tour. To make her fans wait, the release of “Comme j’ai mal”, initially scheduled for August, was delayed to July, although no music video was shot then.[1][2] The three official remixes available on the various formats were produced by Laurent Boutonnat and Bertrand Châtenet. As the previous single “California”, a CD maxi was released in Germany. The song was later included in the studio version on the 2001 best of album Les Mots.

California (Mylène Farmer song)

“California” is a 1995 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. It was the third single from her fourth studio album, Anamorphosée, and was released on 26 March 1996. The song marked the only collaboration with American movie screenwriter and director Abel Ferrara, who directed the very expensive music video in which Farmer appears both as a bourgeois woman and a prostitute. A tribute to California, the song is generally deemed as one of Farmer’s signature songs and has been performed during most of the singer’s tours. It has met with relative success in France and Belgium, and became one of her hits in Russia.

It’s a beautiful day

“C’est une belle journée” (English: “It’s a Beautiful Day”) is a 2001 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was the second single from her best of Les Mots and was released on 16 April 2002. The song contains melancholy lyrics set to dance music and was illustrated by a cartoon video produced by Farmer’s boyfriend. It achieved great success in France where it remained ranked for several months on the top 50.

It’s in the air

“C’est dans l’air” (English: “It’s in the Air”) is a 2008 electronic dance song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It is the fourth single from her seventh studio album Point de suture. The CD-single was released on 27 April 2009, followed by other formats one week later. Unlike Farmer’s three previous singles, the song failed to enter at number one of the French Singles Chart, but topped the chart the week after, becoming Farmer’s eighth number one single (and her fourth consecutive) in France. A live version of the song was also released, as the first single from Farmer’s 2009 live album N°5 on Tour.[1]

Beyond My Control

“Beyond My Control” is a 1991 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. It was the fourth single from her third studio album L’Autre… and was released in May 1992. The song probably remains well known for its music video that caused controversy and was censored at the time because of its sexual and violent content. It achieved minor success in terms of sales, even though it reached the top ten in France and Belgium.

Bleu Noir (song)

“Bleu noir” (“Blue Black”) is a 2010 song by French pop musician Mylène Farmer. It is the second single to her eighth studio album Bleu Noir, released in December 2010. The song was written and produced by Moby with lyrics by Farmer, and the music video produced by French film director Olivier Dahan. It was released on 18 April 2011. In France, the song became Farmer’s eleventh number-one hit on the singles chart, but quickly dropped.

Before the shadow … (song)

“Avant que l’ombre…” (English: “Before the Shadow…”) is a song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer in a studio version in 2005 and in a live version at the time of her 2006 concerts at Bercy (Paris). It was the first single from her fourth live album, Avant que l’ombre… à Bercy, and was released on 26 November 2006. It achieved a moderate success in terms of sales, although it reached the top ten in France.

Call my number

“Appelle mon numéro” (English: “Call/dial My Number”) is a 2008 song recorded by French singer Mylène Farmer. Released on 3 November 2008, it was the second single from her seventh studio album, Point de Suture. It received generally positive reviews from critics and was more aired on radio and television than Farmer’s previous single, “Dégénération”. In France, the single allowed Farmer to establish a new record: to obtain a sixth number-one hit.

Allan (song)

“Allan” is a 1988 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer from her second album Ainsi soit je…. It was the first single from her first live album En Concert and was released in December 1989. The lyrics clearly refer to a fairly tale by Edgar Allan Poe as they mentioned one of his characters. Although the single met success in discothèques, its sales remained relatively low in comparison with Farmer’s other singles.

L’Instant X

“L’Instant X” (English: “The X Moment”) is a 1995 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. It was the second single from her fourth album Anamorphosée and was released on 12 December 1995. Directed by Marcus Nispel in New York, the music video depicts with humour the apocalypse and shows Farmer bathing in the foam. The song became the biggest hit from the album, reaching number six in France, with a long chart trajectory. In January 2004, the song was the subject of a remix produced by One-T and was released as promotional single.

Amen I … (song)

“Ainsi soit je…” (English: “So Be I…”) is a 1988 song recorded by the French artist Mylène Farmer. The song was released as a single twice: as the second single from her second studio album Ainsi soit je… on 4 April 1988, and as the second single in a live version from her second live album Live à Bercy on 20 August 1997. Both versions achieved a relative success on the charts, failing twice to reach the top ten in France.

After the huge success of “Sans contrefaçon”, Boutonnat and Farmer decided to release as a new single the title track “Ainsi soit je…”, just one month before the album release. It was the first ballad of the singer.[1] The cover of the single, which was created by Farmer’s friend, Elsa Trillat, is almost identical to the album’s one, but without the puppet which featured in the video “Sans contrefaçon”. The single was released under the traditional formats (vinyls) but also CD maxi and, for the first time, a CD video.[2] The single was also released in Japan, but about two years after the Francophone countries.[3]

In the shade

“À l’ombre” (English: In the Shadow) is a song recorded by the French singer Mylène Farmer. This electropop song was written by Farmer with music composed by Laurent Boutonnat. It was the lead single from her ninth studio album Monkey Me (2012), released on 22 October 2012 digitally, and on 26 November in physical formats. The single entered the French chart at number four, then dropped out of the top 50 and jumped to number one on the chart edition of 8 December 2012. It also peaked in the Belgian (Walloon) chart at number two.

What I use …

“À quoi je sers…” (English: “What good am I…”) is a 1989 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer. The single was a new song when it was released in July 1989, being not available on Farmer’s studio albums, but only in a live version on En Concert. Marking the end of Farmer’s first period of work, it hit a moderate success in France.

In May 1989, Farmer began her first tour throughout France, which was a great success. Farmer would probably wrote the lyrics of “À quoi je sers…” during this tour, as she was incredibly surprised by her success on stage and she expressed doubts about the direction of her musical career.[1] The singer and her partner Laurent Boutonnat decided to record this song as new single, with another unpublished song on the B-side, “La Veuve noire”, whose music is very similar to that of “À quoi je sers…”. Both songs were recorded fairly quickly. However, due to the success of the previous single “Sans logique”, “À quoi je sers…” was not released before July 1989. Little broadcast on radio, the song appeared as a synthesis of the singer’s work and marked the end of the first period of Farmer’s career.[2]

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