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Wonderwall (song)

“Wonderwall” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by the band’s guitarist and main songwriter Noel Gallagher. The song was produced by Owen Morris for their second studio album (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? (1995). According to Gallagher, “Wonderwall” describes “an imaginary friend who’s gonna come and save you from yourself”.[2]

The song was released as the third single from the album in October 1995. “Wonderwall” topped the chart in Australia, New Zealand, and Spain. The song reached the top ten on another ten charts, including Canada and the United States at number 5 and 8, respectively, as well as number two on both the UK Singles Chart and Irish Singles Chart. The single was certified platinum by the British Phonographic Industry and certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America.

It remains one of the band’s most popular songs; on 9 June 2013, it was voted number one on Australian alternative music radio station Triple J’s “20 Years of the Hottest 100”.[3] Many notable artists have also covered the song, such as rock singer Ryan Adams in 2003, folk singer Cat Power, and jazz musician Brad Mehldau in 2008.[4]

Who Feels Love?

“Who Feels Love?” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by the band’s lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. It became the second single to be released from the album Standing on the Shoulder of Giants, peaking at number 4 in the UK charts. Though the single was a success, it failed to achieve a Silver or better sales certification in the UK – unlike the previous 12 British Oasis singles.

The album was noted for its psychedelic feel, and “Who Feels Love?” was held up as the most extreme example of this. Mark Stent was praised for his production on the song, creating a “trippy” feel like that found on Beatles songs such as “Rain”. With the psychedelic and Eastern sound, the song also reminds of George Harrison achievements like “Within You Without You” and also some of his solo work.

However, despite the high-quality production, the song was not well received by the critics, NME said that the production “triumphs over any real sort of feeling… pure mock Maharishi spirituality that not even Liam can salvage from the realm of self-parody”.

One of the B-sides is a cover of The Beatles’ “Helter Skelter”. It was played live during the Shoulders tour of 2000. Paul Weller recorded a version of b-side “One Way Road” for his covers-album Studio 150 in 2004. The Weller version was subsequently used as the theme tune to Jack Dee’s sitcom Lead Balloon.

The video was filmed in Death Valley, California.

Where Did It All Go Wrong?

“Where Did It All Go Wrong?” is a song and single by the English rock band Oasis, originally released on their 2000 album, Standing on the Shoulder of Giants.

Written by guitarist Noel Gallagher, it is one of two songs on Standing on the Shoulder of Giants that features him on lead vocals. In explaining why front man Liam Gallagher did not sing the song, Noel claimed that: “[Vocally] Liam just couldn’t get that one. The melody shifts quite a lot… Liam hasn’t got that dynamism in his voice.”[1]

Noel stated that the song’s lyrics are about a circle of friends that he was involved with at one time in his life, as well as being semi-autobiographical.[1] Q Magazine stated that the song is “Easily a stand-out moment in the vast pantheon of Gallagher anthems… [an] evocative heartbreak record for the disaffected middle youth who is still a vulnerable youngster at the core…”[2]

An rare early demo of the track featured flautist Charlotte Glasson, but when the album was re-recorded the flute part was not included. Glasson featured on Gas Panic! from the same album.

Although not released as a commercial single, the song was released as a radio-single in the United States, where the song received airplay but failed to chart due in part to no official release.

Whatever (Oasis song)

“Whatever” is a song and single by the English rock band Oasis, and initially credited as being written by the band’s lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. A subsequent lawsuit awarded a co-writing credit to Neil Innes.

At six minutes and twenty-one seconds, “Whatever” was the longest single the band had released up to that point (it was later surpassed by “Champagne Supernova”, “D’You Know What I Mean?” and “All Around the World”). The song follows an AB structure, which differs from Verse-Chorus, as the main hook occurs at the beginning of the song. The song suddenly changes key during the bridge, before returning to the main chord progression of the song, which repeats for a two-and-a-half-minute outro in which, one by one, each instrument cuts out until only the strings are playing. Finally, the song ends with an extended, recorded applause track. A common word on the Japanese festivals’ mikoshi is used at the end of the song.

The single was released on 18 December 1994 as a stand-alone single, bridging the gap between Oasis’ debut album, Definitely Maybe, and their second album, (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?. “Whatever” entered the UK Singles Chart at number 3, their first single to enter the top 5, something every Oasis single released since has also accomplished, aside from the download-only single “Lord Don’t Slow Me Down”, “I’m Outta Time” and “Falling Down”. Like “Lord Don’t Slow Me Down”, this is a non-album release, but as it is a single it has been included on the compilation album Time Flies… 1994–2009 which features all 27 of Oasis’ singles released in the UK. The strings were played by the London Philharmonic Orchestra which featured former Electric Light Orchestra violinist Wilfred Gibson. The strings were arranged by Nick Ingman and Noel Gallagher.

“Whatever” has sold 540,000 copies to date.[1] The song re-entered the UK Singles Chart on 20 June 2010 at number 64, due to the release of Time Flies, and was the first time that it had been available to purchase digitally.[2]

The song has been used by Coca-Cola in its 2012 campaign celebrating its 125th anniversary[3] and also in Italian Vodafone commercials.[4] It was also used by Asahi Breweries for their Asahi Off beer commercials in Japan.[5][6]

The Shock of the Lightning

“The Shock of the Lightning” is a song by English rock band Oasis and is the fourth track from the band’s seventh studio album, Dig Out Your Soul. The song was released as the first single from the album on 29 September 2008. It received its first airplay on 15 August 2008 on multiple UK and Irish radio stations including the Ian Dempsey Breakfast show on Today FM in Ireland, BBC 6 Music by Shaun Keaveny,[2] and by Chris Moyles on BBC Radio 1. Chris was joined by Noel Gallagher on 15 August 2008.[1]

The Masterplan (song)

“The Masterplan” is a song by English rock band Oasis. It was written by lead guitarist Noel Gallagher.

The song was first released as a B-side to the CD version of their hit single “Wonderwall” in October 1995. “The Masterplan” was also released with the Stop the Clocks EP in November 2006. It also shares the name with the 1998 B-side compilation album, The Masterplan, on which it is featured as the last track.

Noel Gallagher has regularly declared “The Masterplan” as one of the best songs he has ever written. However, he regrets the fact that it was first released as a mere B-side, admitting he was “young and stupid”, when he made that decision. He also claims that Creation Records boss, Alan McGee, upon hearing the song, told Noel it was “too good” to be a B-side. Noel reportedly replied, “Well, I don’t write shit songs!”[1]

“The Masterplan” is sung by Noel, and features all band members except lead vocalist Liam Gallagher, in addition to an orchestra. The song also features a backwards guitar solo after the first chorus. Approximately 30 seconds from the end of the song, Noel can be heard (distortedly) singing the chorus from “Octopus’s Garden” by The Beatles.

“The Masterplan” was generally well received on iTunes with around 700-800 downloads on the release date of Stop the Clocks.

The song is included in Oasis’ compilation album, Stop the Clocks. A special L. S. Lowry-inspired animated promotional video, complete with a swaggering Liam, was created to promote the album. In the video, the band walk past Johnny Roadhouse music, a music shop from which the Gallagher brothers regularly bought equipment from at the beginning of their career. It also features on the soundtrack to the Spanish film La Mujer Más Fea del Mundo as well as appearing in an episode of CSI: Miami.

The song was performed at the MTV Unplugged concert in August 1996.

The Hindu Times

“The Hindu Times” is a song by the British rock band Oasis. It was the first single released from their fifth album Heathen Chemistry on 15 April 2002. It was written by lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. Noel got the name “The Hindu Times” from a T-shirt he saw in a charity shop. The song was the band’s sixth number one single on the UK Singles Chart, staying on top for one week before being dislodged by the Sugababes’ “Freak Like Me”.[1] The single also topped the charts in Canada and Italy, and peaked at number two in the Republic of Ireland and Spain.

The title has little to do with the lyrics of the song, which are more in the vein of Definitely Maybe’s “Rock ‘n’ Roll Star”. It has been speculated that the title refers to the main riff’s similarity to Indian music in sound, sounding as if it were played on a sitar. Gallagher himself says that it is because he had already named the song before any lyrics were written for it.

The song, which combines powerful rock with a psychedelic feel, was one of the first Oasis singles since the singles from (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? to receive almost unanimously positive reviews from critics.[2][3]

The song was unveiled during Oasis’ Autumn 2001 Noise and Confusion Tour. The song was due to be released commercially at the same time but Noel decided the track needed more work done on it to be suitable for release. Many have commented on the main guitar riff being lifted from the Stereophonics song, “Same Size Feet”, which uses exactly the same, or at least very similar, guitar riff.

In 2008 NME listed the song as one of the greatest indie anthems of the 2000s. In October 2011, NME placed it at number 143 on its list “150 Best Tracks of the Past 15 Years”.[4]

In 2010, XFM listed it in their “1000 greatest songs of all time” list.[5]

The B-side, “Just Getting Older”, was written at the time of the release of Standing on the Shoulder of Giants. The other b-side, “Idler’s Dream”, is the only Oasis song to not feature any guitars or drums; the song consists simply of Noel Gallagher’s vocals and a piano accompaniment.

Stop Crying Your Heart Out

“Stop Crying Your Heart Out” is a song by the English rock band Oasis. The song was written by Noel Gallagher and produced by Oasis. It was released on 17 May 2002 as the second single from the band’s fifth studio album, Heathen Chemistry (2002). Liam Gallagher is the lead vocalist on the track, with Noel on backing vocals. The power ballad was heavily compared to the band’s previous single “Slide Away”. While some praised Noel’s ability to lighten the mood of his target audience, others felt that the song was disappointing and forgettable.

“Stop Crying Your Heart Out” debuted and peaked at number two on the UK Singles Chart and reached a peak of number six on the UK Indie Chart. It peaked at number one in Italy, and reached the top-twenty in Belgium, Denmark, Finland and Norway. “Stop Crying Your Heart Out” was certified silver by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) on 12 July 2002, denoting shipments of over 200,000 copies. British singer-songwriter Leona Lewis recorded a cover version for her second studio album Echo (2009). She performed her version on the sixth series finale of The X Factor, and it peaked at number 29 on the UK Singles Chart and number 11 on the UK R&B Chart.

Supersonic (Oasis song)

“Supersonic” is the debut single by the English rock band Oasis, written by lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. It was released on 11 April 1994 as Oasis’ debut single and appears on their debut album Definitely Maybe, released in August 1994.

The song was released on 11 April 1994 and peaked at number 31 on the UK Singles Chart, Oasis’s lowest-peaking single. However, over time it has amassed sales of over 215,000, making it their 13th biggest selling single ever in the UK, even outselling their 2002 number one “The Hindu Times”, and both of their 2005 number ones, “Lyla” and “The Importance of Being Idle”.

“Supersonic” was also the band’s first single to chart in the United States, where it peaked at number 11 on the US Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart on 10 December 1994. The song was performed by the band on their debut national TV performance on Channel 4’s The Word. It remains a favourite song of both the band and their fans (on the Definitely Maybe DVD, Noel cites it as his favourite Oasis song). The single went silver in the UK in 2006.

In March 2005, Q magazine placed “Supersonic” at number 20 in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks. In May 2007, NME magazine placed “Supersonic” at number 25 in its list of the 50 Greatest Indie Anthems Ever.

Sunday Morning Call

“Sunday Morning Call” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, taken from their fourth studio album, Standing on the Shoulder of Giants.

Although unconfirmed, there was widespread speculation at the time that the song was inspired by Noel’s friend Kate Moss. “Sunday Morning Call” was the first Oasis single to have Noel sing lead vocals on both B-sides, as well as the A-side.

The song was released as the third and final single from the album on 3 July 2000, peaking at number 4 in the UK charts. Written and sung by Noel Gallagher, it is the first time Noel has taken over lead vocal from brother Liam on an A-side of a single since “Don’t Look Back in Anger” in 1996.

Though the song has the same anthemic feel that popularised many Oasis songs, and departs from the psychedelic feel of Standing on the Shoulder of Giants, which had been poorly received by critics, it received a mixed critical reception. NME described it as “a dreary thing indeed”, whereas Allmusic described it as a “self-consciously mature departure from the group’s usual ebullience… a deliberately mellow, mid-tempo [song]”. In addition, the Time Flies… 1994–2009 album features “Sunday Morning Call” as a hidden track at the end of disc 2, being the only single to not be credited on the sleeve or feature its own, separate track. A possible reason for this was presented in the audio commentary of the accompanying DVD, where Noel states that he “hates” the track.

Stand by Me (Oasis song)

“Stand by Me” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by lead guitarist, Noel Gallagher. It was the second single to be released from the band’s third album, Be Here Now.

The song peaked at number two in the UK charts in September 1997, being kept from the top spot by the record-breaking Elton John single “Candle in the Wind 1997”, which was re-recorded and released in memory of Diana, Princess of Wales, who had died three weeks before the release of “Stand by Me”. Despite this, “Stand by Me” still went gold in the UK. It ended up at #44 in the end of year charts in the UK for 1997.

Songbird (Oasis song)

“Songbird” is a song by English rock band Oasis, from their fifth studio album Heathen Chemistry, and is the first single by Oasis written by vocalist Liam Gallagher.

Liam has said of the song: “I like beautiful things…It’s not all dark in Liam World. I take me shades off every now and again and have a look at the world and see some nice things.” Noel Gallagher stated jokingly in an interview with Patrick Kielty that Liam decided to “write a song about his bird”, and states the title “Song… bird” in a cave man like manner. The song was written as a tribute to then-fiancée Nicole Appleton.[1] “Songbird” was composed in the key of G major using common time at 132 beats per minute.[2]

“              Songbird blew my head off when I first heard it because it was that f–king simple and that direct. But when Liam plays you a song he wants you to instantly f–king drop dead on the spot and then, when you come around, stab yourself in the heart and be in awe of the f–king sonic ability of the man.[3]

Some Might Say

“Some Might Say” is a song by the English rock band Oasis. It was released as the first single on 24 April 1995 from their second studio album, (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? (1995). The song was written by the band’s lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. “Some Might Say” provided Oasis with their first number one in the UK Singles Chart.[1][2]

The single release was also named an EP in the Stop the Clocks booklet. It is one of the only Oasis singles to officially be also categorised an extended play.

Slide Away (Oasis song)

“Slide Away” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, taken from their debut studio album Definitely Maybe (1994). It was written by lead guitarist Noel Gallagher and serves as the tenth track on the album.

Noel Gallagher claims he wrote it on a Les Paul guitar that Johnny Marr sent to him, since he had few guitars available to him at the time.[1] On the Definitely Maybe DVD, he also notes that he took Marr’s guitar out of the case, sat down, and “the song wrote itself”. Gallagher wrote it about his girlfriend at the time – Louise Jones and the song was written about their stormy relationship.[2] He described them as “soulmates” and when they finally split up in June 1994, Noel said ‘I don’t think I’ll ever get over it.’

During the recording of Definitely Maybe, there was an argument between Gallagher and rhythm guitarist Paul “Bonehead” Arthurs. Gallagher was taken to the pub by bassist Paul “Guigsy” McGuigan where he calmed down, had a few drinks, went back to the studios and recorded “Slide Away”.

In an interview on the bonus DVD of Stop the Clocks, Gallagher comments that the track contains his brother Liam’s best ever singing.

She Is Love

“She Is Love” is a song by English rock band Oasis, first released as the ninth track on their fifth studio album, Heathen Chemistry, written and sung by guitarist Noel Gallagher. In September 2002, it was released with “Little by Little” as the first double A-sided single by the band, peaking at #2 in the UK Singles Chart (see 2002 in British music). The song was written about Noel Gallagher’s girlfriend Sara McDonald and is a light, acoustic song about being in love.

Gallagher claims it was written in the Buckingham Gate Hotel in London, and that it took 30 minutes to complete. The band commissioned British fashion art director Rachel Thomas to make a promo video for the song. However, the resulting film, a mix of animation and live action, has never been released on any format.

This track is also included on the compilation album Time Flies… 1994–2009

Shakermaker

“Shakermaker” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. The song was first released as a single on 13 June 1994 and later released on Oasis’ debut album Definitely Maybe. The single narrowly missed the UK top 10, peaking at number eleven. It was also the first song performed by the band on Top of the Pops. It is the only single from the band’s debut album not to be certified Silver by the BPI.

Roll with It (Oasis song)

“Roll with It” is a song by English rock band Oasis, written by lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. It was released on 14 August 1995 as the second single (the lead single) from their second album (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?, reaching #2 on the UK Singles Chart.[1]

“Roll with It” received a great deal of attention when Food Records, the label of Britpop rivals Blur, moved the original release date of the single “Country House” to clash with it, sparking what came to be known as “The Battle of Britpop”[citation needed]. The British media had already reported an intense rivalry between the two bands and this clash of releases was seen as a battle for the number one spot. The media sensation was spurred on by verbal attacks from the respective camps (in particular Noel and Liam Gallagher, Damon Albarn and Alex James), that extended beyond the music industry to the point where the two bands were regularly mentioned on the evening news[citation needed]. In particular, public imagination was sparked by the contrast between the gritty, working class Oasis and the artsy, middle class Blur. In the end, Blur’s “Country House” single sold 274,000 copies to Oasis’ 216,000 copies of “Roll with It”. The singles charted at number 1 and number 2 respectively.[2]

Rock ‘n’ Roll Star

“Rock ‘n’ Roll Star” is a song by English rock band Oasis. It is the opening track from their record breaking debut album, Definitely Maybe. Like the majority of the band’s songs from this era, it was written by lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. Noel said that “Rock ‘n’ Roll Star” was one of only three songs in which he wanted to say something: “I’ve pretty much summed up everything I wanted to say in “Rock ‘n’ Roll Star”, “Live Forever” and “Cigarettes & Alcohol”, after that I’m repeating myself, but in a different way”.[1] It became a fan favourite and was often played to close the band’s gigs.

It was released as a radio single in America. The song’s video, directed by Nigel Dick, consists of clips of the band performing the song from their Live by the Sea gig, interspersed with clips of them on Southend Pier, in and around the amusement park, ‘Adventure Island’ then named ‘Peter Pan’s Playground’ and in the bowling alley which was located on Southend Pier before it burnt down in June 1995.[2]

The song was featured on the band’s 2000 live album and DVD, Familiar to Millions, and another live version was recorded at a 2 July 2005 concert at the City of Manchester Stadium and released on the band’s single “Let There Be Love” in late 2005.

Don’t Believe the Truth

Don’t Believe the Truth is the sixth studio album by the English rock band Oasis, released on 30 May 2005 through Big Brother Records. It reached number one in the UK Albums Chart with first week sales of just under 238,000, and is the 32nd fastest selling album ever in the UK. The album entered the US charts at number 12, with 65,000 copies sold in the first week, the highest any Oasis album had reached there since 1997’s Be Here Now, although its chart stay was brief. Don’t Believe the Truth went triple platinum in the UK in the first week of 2006 (900,000+ sales), and in the US has sold more than 200,000 copies.[1][2]

Every member of the band contributed to the writing of tracks for the album, and the album is the first where all duties were divided between the band members. On some of the tracks regular bass player Andy Bell handled guitar, while Gem Archer and Noel Gallagher contributed bass to other songs. Don’t Believe the Truth is the first Oasis record to feature the drumming of Zak Starkey who, while not an official member of Oasis, performed and toured with them following the departure of longtime drummer Alan White. The album received positive reviews from critics and many cited it as Oasis’s best album in nearly a decade.

Liam Gallagher also had a larger impact on the album by his developing songwriting. Noel has said that this album is his favourite of Oasis’ last four, because all members have contributed to it. This, he claims, has given it a different feel from a typically Noel-written Oasis album.

The band embarked on a massive worldwide tour that started off at the London Astoria for their Don’t Believe the Truth Tour, visiting 26 countries and playing to 3.2 million people at a total of 113 concerts. This resulted in the making of Lord Don’t Slow Me Down, a film later released on DVD.[3] To date the album has sold more than 7 million copies worldwide.[4]

Morning Glory (Oasis song)

“Morning Glory” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by Noel Gallagher, and released on the band’s second album (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? in September 1995. It was given an Australian-only single release and was also a radio single in the United States.

Gallagher claims that he was drunk while writing the song.[citation needed] According to him, parts of the song were inspired by walking while listening to a Walkman (“walking to the sound of my favourite tune”) and using cocaine (“all your dreams are made / when you’re chained to the mirror and the razor blade”), since razors are often used to cut cocaine into lines on a mirror, from which they are then snorted.[citation needed] It has been suggested that the song is about drug addiction in general (“need a little time to wake up/need a little time to rest your mind/you know you should so I guess you might as well”).[citation needed]
The line “tomorrow never knows what it doesn’t know too soon” seems to reference The Beatles’ song “Tomorrow Never Knows”, though Gallagher claims to have completely forgotten why he felt it was relevant to the song.[citation needed] Over the years, the song was regular on their live performance set.[citation needed]
Towards the end of “Morning Glory”, a woman can be heard singing “without a lover to call your own”. This is a snippet from a Soul II Soul track called “Love Enuff”, which bleeds into track 11 on the Morning Glory album and was a hit in July 1995. Its unclear whether its inclusion is deliberate or not. The song’s guitar riff closely resembles “The One I Love” by R.E.M.

Lyla (song)

“Lyla” is a song by the English rock band Oasis. The song was released as the first single from the band’s sixth album Don’t Believe the Truth, released in May 2005.

The song was written by Oasis guitarist Noel Gallagher, who has varyingly described the track as “specifically designed for pogoing”, “annoyingly catchy”, and the “poppiest thing since “Roll with It””. Noting the varied influences of the song, Gallagher says that it’s “a bit like… The Soundtrack of Our Lives doing The Who on Skol in a psychedelic city in the sky, or something”.[1]

Lord Don’t Slow Me Down (song)

“Lord Don’t Slow Me Down” is a song by British rock band Oasis. The song was released as a download-only single on 21 October 2007 and was also released on a limited edition 12-inch single in promotion of the release of Oasis’ rockumentary of the same name, Lord Don’t Slow Me Down.[1][2] On 29 October, the song debuted at number ten in the UK Singles Chart, becoming Oasis’ 21st UK top 10.[3] It is also their 21st top ten single in a row. It is also the first single by Oasis not to reach the top 4 since 1994’s “Cigarettes & Alcohol”. The song impacted US radio on October 30, 2007.[4]

In October 2006 the first part of the song was used in a preview of the band’s movie. Written and sung by Noel Gallagher and recorded during the Don’t Believe the Truth sessions, Gallagher described it as being “one of the best things, like The Who, The Yardbirds and the Jeff Beck Group combined, and it’s got two drum solos on it!”. The entire song leaked into the internet just a few days before the video was uploaded on YouTube and the song was played on the radio, on 1 October. The song was a probable track to be included on the band’s 2005 album, Don’t Believe the Truth, but was removed from the final track list by Noel Gallagher, as he thought he sang on too many songs on the record.[original research?] In May 2008 an unreleased studio version with Liam Gallagher on lead vocals was leaked over internet fansites.

This song is included on Dig Out Your Soul bonus CD.

Live Forever

“Live Forever” is a song by the English rock band Oasis. Written by Noel Gallagher, the song was released as the third single from their debut album Definitely Maybe (1994) on 8 August 1994, just prior to that album’s release.

Gallagher wrote the song in 1991, before he joined Oasis. Inspired by the Rolling Stones’ “Shine a Light”, “Live Forever” features a basic song structure and lyrics with an optimistic outlook that contrasted with the attitude of the grunge bands popular at the time. The song was the first Oasis single to enter the top ten in the United Kingdom, and garnered critical acclaim.

Little by Little (Oasis song)

“Little by Little” is a song by English rock band Oasis, first released as the sixth track on their fifth studio album Heathen Chemistry. In September 2002, it was released with “She Is Love” as the first (and only) double A-side single by the band, peaking at #2 in the UK Singles Chart (see 2002 in British music). Noel Gallagher provides lead vocals on both tracks, which he also wrote.

“Little by Little” was perhaps the most controversial song on the album, receiving mixed reviews from those who felt it was a classic example of an upbeat Oasis anthem and those who felt it was a twee, patronising, sycophantic melody. Regardless of this, the song managed to peak at number two in the UK charts based largely on the publicity garnered by the song.

The promo video to the song featured a guest role by Robert Carlyle. The cover art for the single is an homage to Robert Indiana’s Love artwork series.

Let There Be Love (Oasis song)

“Let There Be Love” is a song by the English rock band Oasis from their sixth studio album, Don’t Believe the Truth.[1] Written by Noel Gallagher, it is the third Oasis song to feature Liam and Noel on lead vocals, the first being the B-side “Acquiesce”, and the second being “Put Yer Money Where Yer Mouth Is”. It was released on 28 November 2005 as the third single from the album in the UK (see 2005 in British music), and the second single in the US. It reached number two in the UK charts, capping a very successful year for the band. Many critics cited this song as proof that Oasis had returned to the form seen in the mid-1990s.

I’m Outta Time

“I’m Outta Time” is a song by English rock band Oasis, featured on their seventh studio album, Dig Out Your Soul. The second single from the album, succeeding “The Shock of the Lightning”, “I’m Outta Time” was written by lead vocalist Liam Gallagher and released on 1 December 2008.[1]

The song bears similarity, in style, to John Lennon’s work in the early 1970s. The piano which features on the track partly emulates that of Lennon’s “Jealous Guy”, with the three octave jumps in C major. The song also has a backing piano part similar in content to that of The Beatles’ “A Day in the Life”,[2] which also contains a three octave jump in C major. Liam jokingly claims that it took him nine years to write the song.[2] However, in a different interview Liam Gallagher claimed that he wrote the song “While sitting on the end of my bed”.

The song features a short speech sample from John Lennon taken from one of his last interviews in 1980.[3] The speech sample says: “As Churchill said, it’s every Englishman’s inalienable right to live where the hell he likes. What’s it going to do, vanish? Is it not going to be there when I get back?”.[4]

Half the World Away

“Half the World Away” is a song by English rock band Oasis. It is well known as the theme tune to the popular BBC sitcom The Royle Family.

The song was written by Oasis’ lead guitarist Noel Gallagher, who also provides lead vocals. The song is a slow acoustic tune with plodding keyboards, and the lyric – much like “Rock ‘n’ Roll Star” – expresses a desire to leave a stagnant life in a boring city. The song is primarily in C Major.[1]

Recorded at The Congress House Studio, Austin, Texas in October 1994, “Half the World Away” was first released as a B-side to “Whatever” on 18 December 1994, reaching #3 in the UK charts.[2]

In 1998 the song was included in The Masterplan, a collection of Oasis’ best B-sides. The collection was a success, peaking at #2 in the UK charts. The track is also included on Oasis’ compilation album Stop the Clocks, which also reached #2. The song reached #56 in the UK charts in 2015 following the release of Aurora’s cover version, marking their first top 100 song since the release of “Falling Down” in 2009.

Go Let It Out

“Go Let It Out” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by the band’s lead guitarist, and chief songwriter, Noel Gallagher. It was released in 2000 as the first single from their fourth studio album Standing on the Shoulder of Giants. The song peaked at #1 in the UK Singles Chart[1] and was later certified Silver. The song was the 36th best selling single of 2000 in the UK.

The song samples the drums from Johnny Jenkins’ version of Dr John’s “I Walk on Gilded Splinters.” Noel described the song as “the closest we came to sounding like a modern day Beatles” in the ‘Lock the Box’ interview found on the DVD in the special edition of Stop the Clocks.
Due to the departure of guitarist Bonehead and bassist Guigsy in the early recording sessions for Standing on the Shoulder of Giants, the track features only Liam Gallagher (vocals), Noel Gallagher (rhythm guitar, bass guitar, lead guitar, keyboards) and Alan White (drums). It also contains a drum loop.
Oasis were looking for replacements for founding members Bonehead and Guigsy and while Bonehead was replaced with fellow Creation signing and former Heavy Stereo frontman Gem Archer, Guigsy proved harder to replace. Thus the video for “Go Let It Out” had to be filmed with Noel on bass, Archer in Noel’s role as lead guitarist and Liam in Archer’s role as rhythm guitarist.
The B-side “Let’s All Make Believe” was placed by Q magazine placing at number one on its list of the ‘500 best lost tracks’ and at number four on its list of songs to download for the month of January 2006. Q magazine said in the description, “If Standing on the Shoulder of Giants had contained this track, it would have probably got another star.” The song featured on the Japanese release of the album.
In the “Lock the Box” interview, Noel considers “Go Let It Out” to be “head and shoulders” above any other songs he had written during this time, and “up there with some of the best things I’ve ever done.”
The video was filmed on location in Surrey, England by director Nick Egan in January 2000.

Falling Down (Oasis song)

“Falling Down” is a song by English rock band Oasis, featured on their 2008 seventh studio album Dig Out Your Soul. Written and sung by lead guitarist Noel Gallagher, it was released as the third single from the album and is also the final single released by the band with the digital release occurring a day earlier.[1]

An excerpt of the B-side song “Those Swollen Hand Blues” appears at the end of “Mucky Fingers”, the second track of Oasis’ 2005 album Don’t Believe the Truth.

The lyric: “Catch the wheel that breaks the butterfly” references the quotation: “Who breaks a butterfly upon a wheel?” from Alexander Pope’s “Epistle to Dr Arbuthnot”.

Don’t Look Back in Anger

“Don’t Look Back in Anger” is a song by the English rock band Oasis. It was released on 19 February 1996 as the fourth single from their second studio album, (What’s the Story) Morning Glory? (1995). The song was written by the band’s guitarist and main songwriter, Noel Gallagher. It became the band’s second single to reach number one on the UK Singles Chart, where it also went platinum.[1] “Don’t Look Back in Anger” was also the first Oasis single with lead vocals by Noel (who had previously only sung lead on B-sides) instead of his brother, Liam.

It is one of the band’s signature songs, and was played at almost every single live show from its release to the dissolution of the band. It was ranked number one on a list of the ’50 Most Explosive Choruses’ by the NME,[2] and was voted as the fourth most popular single of the last 60 years in the UK by the public in conjunction with the Official Charts Company’s 60th anniversary.[3]

Don’t Go Away

“Don’t Go Away” is a song by the English rock band Oasis from their third album, Be Here Now, written by the band’s lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. The song was released as a single only in Japan, peaking at number 48 on the Oricon chart. It was also a success in the United States, where it hit #5 on the Billboard Hot Modern Rock Tracks chart in late 1997.[1] It was the band’s last major hit in the United States until 2008’s “The Shock of the Lightning”.

D’You Know What I Mean?

“D’You Know What I Mean?” (About this sound sample (help·info)) is a song by the English rock band Oasis. Written by Noel Gallagher, it was released as the first single from their third album Be Here Now (1997).

The song reached number one in the UK Singles Chart, the third Oasis song to do so.[1] The song also claimed the number one position in Ireland, Finland, and Spain as well as reaching the Top 5 in Canada, Norway, Sweden, and New Zealand. It sold 162,000 copies in its first day in the shops and 370,000 by the end of the first week. It is Oasis’s second biggest selling single in the UK with sales of 730,000, achieving Platinum status in the process.[2] It was the 12th biggest selling single of 1997 in the UK.

In October 2011, NME placed it at number 77 on its list “150 Best Tracks of the Past 15 Years”.[3]

In July 2016, an edited, remixed and remastered version of the song was released, entitled D’You Know What I Mean? (NG’s 2016 Rethink). The reissue will form part of the wider rerelease of the Be Here Now album to celebrate its 20th anniversary. [4]

Cigarettes & Alcohol

“Cigarettes & Alcohol” is a song by English rock band Oasis, written by Noel Gallagher. It was released as the fourth single from their debut album Definitely Maybe, and their second to enter the UK top ten in the United Kingdom, peaking at number 7 (three places higher than “Live Forever”), eventually spending 35 weeks on the charts, re-entering the Top 75 on several occasions until 1997.

Champagne Supernova

“Champagne Supernova” is a song by English rock band Oasis, written by guitarist Noel Gallagher. The seven-minute anthem is the closing track on the record-breaking album (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?. Though only released as a single in Australia, U.S., Canada, France and New Zealand in 1996, a music video directed by Nigel Dick[1] was released to music channels and, as a result, the song received significant television and radio airplay.

The song was released in the U.S. as a radio single to great success, becoming the band’s second No. 1 single on the Modern Rock Tracks chart. It also peaked at No. 20 on the Billboard Hot 100 Airplay, becoming the band’s third top 40 single on that chart. The song is considered a fan-favourite and has received widespread critical acclaim. The song is also included on Oasis’ compilation album Stop the Clocks and on the U.S. release of Time Flies… 1994–2009

Boy with the Blues

“Boy with the Blues” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by frontman Liam Gallagher. The song was considered for inclusion on the band’s sixth album, Don’t Believe the Truth, but missed the final cut.[1] In October 2005, Noel Gallagher announced that the song was set to lead a summer 2006 UK EP release. In an interview with the NME, he said: “I think we’re gonna put out just as a single, that’s not going be on the next album.”[1] The sessions for that EP never occurred and the release was cancelled in early 2006. If it had been released, it would have been the first time Oasis have released a stand-alone single since the late 1994 release of “Whatever”.

Noel, in a December 2005 interview for the NME, described the track as being driven by a piano and acoustic guitars. He also mentioned that the track has got a chant at the end, where the words go “‘Come all together / If we come all together / We’ll come all together for you’.” He was quoted as saying “It’s a bit like Spiritualized, y’know, when they do that gospel thing. The bulk of the song is only about three minutes long, but the outro could go on forever, really.” Noel also said the track didn’t go on the Don’t Believe the Truth album because of a lack of a chorus.[1] He also said that the track needed more work done on it and spoke of planned recording session in January 2006 during a break in their Don’t Believe the Truth world tour.[1] However, these sessions didn’t take place.[2]

In different interviews conducted in February 2006, Noel and Liam both made conflicting statements as to the future of the track. Liam was quoted as saying, “After the tour we’ll do some recording, then we’ll put it out,”[3] whilst Noel said, “We had a couple of tracks left over from the last record and in our own heads we thought they were good enough to be released as an EP. We went back and listened to the tapes and we reckon we can get it better, so we’re having the year off instead.”[2]

In the February 2007 NME issue, Noel said: “You can spot a Liam title from 1000 paces. It could be like a gospel track or something. It could be eight or nine minutes long because there’s a great refrain in the chorus which could go on for… well…forever.”[4]

The song was finally released with the Deluxe version of Oasis’ seventh studio album Dig Out Your Soul.[5][6] This song was also released as a part of Oasis’ download-only EP Boy with the Blues.

In the United States, it was released on NCIS: The Official TV Soundtrack while a brief snippet of the song itself was heard during the NCIS Season 6 episode, Legend Part 1 which also served as the backdoor pilot for NCIS: Los Angeles.

All Around the World (Oasis song)

“All Around the World” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by the band’s lead guitarist and principal songwriter Noel Gallagher. Released on 12 January 1998, the track peaked at number one in the UK Singles Chart;[1] it is the longest single ever to do so (the track on both the CD and 12″ release is 18 seconds longer than the album version found on Be Here Now). It is also the longest song ever recorded by Oasis. The single went gold in the UK. This was the last Oasis single to be released on the Creation Records label. The song also reached #15 on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart.

“All Around the World”—nearly ten minutes long—is embellished with string and horn pieces, and is followed by the two-minute-long instrumental “All Around the World (Reprise)”. Upon its release, the reviews were generally positive. As with many Oasis songs (e.g., “Whatever”, “Acquiesce”, “Live Forever”) it sends the message that “everything’s gonna be okay”.

Acquiesce

“Acquiesce” is a song by the English rock band Oasis, written by Noel Gallagher. The song originally appeared as a B-side to Oasis’ first UK #1 single, “Some Might Say”, in April 1995. Its popularity led to it being included on the B-sides compilation album The Masterplan, released in 1998, after being voted for inclusion by fans of the band on their official website.

In 1998, the song was issued as a radio single in the United States to promote the release of The Masterplan. It reached #24 in the US Modern Rock Chart, based on radio airplay.

“Acquiesce” was also released as one of the lead tracks to the Stop the Clocks EP, in promotion of their compilation album of which it also appears on, Stop the Clocks.[1]

The verses to “Acquiesce” are sung by Liam Gallagher, with the chorus sung by Noel (because, he claims, Liam could not reach the high notes[2]), making it the first song to ever feature both Gallagher brothers on lead vocals. The only other Oasis songs to feature both brothers on lead vocals are “Put Yer Money Where Yer Mouth Is”, from their 2000 album Standing on the Shoulder of Giants, “Born on a Different Cloud”, from their 2002 album Heathen Chemistry, and “Let There Be Love”, from their 2005 album Don’t Believe the Truth.

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