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Would I Love You (Love You, Love You)

“Would I Love You (Love You, Love You)” is a popular song with music by Harold Spina and lyrics by Bob Russell. It was published in 1950.

It was popularized by Patti Page in a recording made on January 2, 1951. The recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5571, and first reached the Billboard chart on February 10, 1951, lasting 19 weeks and peaking at #4. [1]

Another recording was made by Doris Day with Harry James. It was issued by Columbia Records as catalog number 39159 with the flip side “Lullaby of Broadway.” It reached #19 on the Billboard chart, lasting 10 weeks beginning on March 2, 1951. [1]

A version by Tony Martin also charted. This recording was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-4056. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on February 23, 1951 and lasted 4 weeks on the chart, peaking at #25. [1]

Wondering (Patti Page song)

“Wondering” is a popular song.

The recording by Patti Page was written by Jack Schafer and released by Mercury Records as catalog number 71101. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on June 3, 1957. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #12; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #35. The flip side was “Old Cape Cod.”

What a Dream

“What a Dream” is a popular song. It was written by Chuck Willis and was published in 1954. the original recording was by Ruth Brown.

A cover by Patti Page was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70416. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on August 4, 1954, and lasted 11 weeks on the chart, peaking at #18. [1] The song was a two-sided hit, with the flip side, “I Cried”, also charting.

The Wall (1957 song)

“The Wall” is a popular song, written by Oramay Diamond, Clyde Otis, and Dave Dreyer.

It was most successfully popularized by Patti Page in 1957. The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 71059, (the flip side of “A Poor Man’s Roses (or a Rich Man’s Gold)”) and first reached the Billboard chart on March 6, 1957, lasting 6 weeks and peaking at #43.

Other 1957 recordings were made by Eileen Rodgers as Columbia Records catalog number 40850 (which peaked at #64), and by Brook Benton as Epic Records 9199.

Shirley Bassey recorded the track at this time whilst in New York, and it was issued in 1959 on the album The Bewitching Miss Bassey. The song can be found on an CD compilation album called Easy To Love issued by Motif Records in 2010, which features the later Bassey recordings for the Philips Records label.

On the Cash Box Best-Selling Records charts, where multiple versions of a song were always combined, the song lasted 5 weeks and peaked at #42.

This Is My Song (1951 song)

“This Is My Song” is a popular song.

It was composed by Dick Charles, a pseudonym of Richard Charles Krieg, on August 23, 1950, and published on December 31, 1951.[1]

It was recorded by Patti Page in 1953, and issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 70183. It entered the Billboard chart on August 8, 1953, at #20, lasting only that one week.[2] The song also became Patti Page’s television theme song.[1]

Tennessee Waltz

“Tennessee Waltz” is a popular country music song with lyrics by Redd Stewart and music by Pee Wee King[1] written in 1946 and first released in January 1948. The song became a multimillion seller via a 1950 recording – as “The Tennessee Waltz” – by Patti Page. As of 1974, it was the biggest selling song ever in Japan.[2]

All versions of the lyrics narrate a situation in which the persona has introduced his or her sweetheart to a friend who then waltzes away with her or him. The lyrics are altered for pronoun gender on the basis of the sex of the singer.

The popularity of “Tennessee Waltz” also made it the fourth official song of the state of Tennessee in 1965.[3]

So in Love

“So in Love” is a popular song, written by Cole Porter, from his musical Kiss Me, Kate, (opening on Broadway in 1948)[1] based on Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew. It was sung in the show by Patricia Morison, reprised by Alfred Drake[1] and further popularized by Patti Page in 1949.

The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5230,[1][2] and first reached the Billboard chart on February 12, 1949, lasting two weeks and peaking at No. 13.[3]

Other versions which were popular that year were by Gordon MacRae and Dinah Shore.[1]

The song has been recorded by many other significant female singers, including Peggy Lee and Ella Fitzgerald.

Once in a While (1937 song)

“Once in a While” is a popular song, written by Michael Edwards with lyrics by Bud Green. The song was published in 1937.

The song is a much-recorded standard. Tommy Dorsey’s recording in 1937 went to number one in the United States.[1] One of the best-known recordings was made by Patti Page in 1952 (on Mercury 5867). The song was revived in doo-wop style by the Chimes in 1960, and their version peaked at number eleven on the Billboard Hot 100 in January 1961.[1]

Old Cape Cod

“Old Cape Cod” is a song, written by Claire Rothrock, Milton Yakus, and Allan Jeffrey, and published in 1957. The single, as recorded by Patti Page, became a gold record, having sold over a million copies. Having been hailed by “Cape Codders” as the “unofficial Cape Cod Anthem, if ever there was one”,[1] the song has been credited with “putting the Cape on the map” and helping to establish Cape Cod as a major tourist destination.[2]

Most People Get Married

“Most People Get Married” is a popular song.

The music was written by Leon Carr, the lyrics by Earl Shuman. The song was published in 1962.

A version by Patti Page charted in 1962, reaching #27 on the Billboard magazine charts. The presence of Patti Page brought the rockabilly-tinged song to the easy listening survey, where it peaked at #8.

The song was also recorded by Joan Regan in the United Kingdom.

Money, Marbles, and Chalk

“Money, Marbles, and Chalk” is a popular song, written by Garner “Pop” Eckler in 1949. Eckler also recorded the song, but the biggest-selling version was recorded by Patti Page in 1949, and issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5251. It entered the Billboard chart on April 23, 1949, at #27, lasting only that one week.[1] The song also spent a week on the Billboard country music chart, at position #15. Many other artists have recorded the song also.

“Money, Marbles & Chalk” was recorded in June 2006 by a group called “Pop’s Boys”. The group is made up of two of Garner Eckler’s nephews, Greg Eckler and Mike Fletcher.

Mockin’ Bird Hill

Mockin’ Bird Hill is a song, written in 3/4 time, by George Vaughn Horton, and perhaps best known through recordings by Patti Page, Donna Fargo, and by Les Paul and Mary Ford in 1951.

The music of “Mockin’ Bird Hill” is based closely on a Swedish waltz called “Livet i Finnskogarna” or “Life in the Finn Woods,” recorded by Carl Jularbo in 1915, which enjoyed some popularity in the U.S. The first recording of the song was made by the Pinetoppers a group consisting of George Vaughn Horton and his brother Roy Horton plus three other men: this recording, which featured a female duo billed as the Beaver Valley Sweethearts,[1] was issued on Coral Records in October 1950. The first recording of “Mockin’ Bird Hill” by an established act was made by guitarist Les Paul with Mary Ford vocalizing, with Patti Page making her recording due to record buyers assuming that the Paul/Ford single was the new Patti Page release.

According to Page she first learned of “Mockin’ Bird Hill” while at Midway Airport: having just completed a Chicago nightclub engagement she was awaiting a flight to New York City to stopover before proceeding to Florida to open at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach the next evening. Page received a phone call at Midway from Mercury Records a&r man Art Talmadge at whose request Page skipped her scheduled flight to allow Talmadge to reach Midway with a portable turntable to play Page the Paul/Ford single which Talmadge suggested Page cover once she’d reached New York City. Page was reluctant to make a recording without the participation of her regular conductor Jack Rael who was awaiting Page in Florida: however Talmadge had already cleared Page’s recording of “Mockin’ Bird Hill” with Rael and had booked studio time and musicians for Page to make the recording. Page would recall: “They had a limo at the airport [in New York City], took me to Bob Fine’s studio. I cut just that one song. I was very happy with it and couldn’t wait for Jack to hear it. He said ‘This is really very good.’ He called Art, and Art said ‘I’m glad you like it, Jack, because we’ve already shipped 200,000 records.”[2]

The Page recording, made on January 17, 1951, was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5595, and first reached the Billboard pop music chart on February 24, 1951, lasting 22 weeks and peaking at #2.[3] At the same time Mercury released a recording, catalog number 5552 by Tiny Hill and the Hillsiders.

The Les Paul/Mary Ford recording was issued by Capitol Records as catalog number 1373, and also reached the Billboard top 10.
On the Cash Box best-selling record charts, where all recordings were combined, the song first entered the chart on March 3, 1951, reached #1 on April 21, 1951, and remained #1 through the May 12, 1951 chart. It came back to the #1 position on May 26.
Big Band orchestra leader, Russ Morgan, recorded the song in 1951 featuring the Gay Sisters on backing vocals. Slim Whitman also recorded two versions of the song.
Mockingbird Hill is also mentioned in Spanish Bombs, a song by The Clash.

Mister and Mississippi

“Mister and Mississippi” is a popular song, written by Irving Gordon. It was published in 1951. The song was popularized by Patti Page. It has been recorded by many others, including Rex Allen, Eddy Arnold, Johnny Bond & the Cass County Boys, Dennis Day, Johnny Desmond, and Tennessee Ernie Ford.

The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5645, and first reached the Billboard chart on May 19, 1951, lasting 15 weeks and peaking at #8. [1]

The recording by Dennis Day was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 47-4140. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on June 1, 1951 and lasted 11 weeks on the chart, peaking at #15. [1]

On Cash Box magazine’s charts, where all versions were combined, the song peaked at #6 on the chart.

The popularity of this song apparently led Gordon, a number of years later, to create another song with even more puns on state names: “Delaware.”

Mama from the Train

“Mama From the Train”, also known as “Mama From the Train (A Kiss, A Kiss)”, is a popular song written by Irving Gordon and published in 1956. The song is about memories of a now-deceased mother, whose Pennsylvania Dutch-influenced English leads to quaint phrasings.

The best-known version was recorded by Patti Page. This recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70971. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on November 3, 1956. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #12; on the Best Seller chart, at #17; on the Juke Box chart, at #12; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #11. In Australia the song afforded Page a #31 hit.

The Mama Doll Song

“The Mama Doll Song” is a popular music song that was written by Nat Simon with lyrics by Charles Tobias. It was published in 1954. A recording by Patti Page was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70458. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on October 20, 1954 and lasted 3 weeks on the chart, peaking at #24.[1] The flip side was “I Can’t Tell a Waltz from a Tango.”

British cover versions were recorded by the Beverley Sisters, Lita Roza and Jean Campbell.

Let Me Go, Lover!

“Let Me Go, Lover!”, a popular song, was written by Jenny Lou Carson and Al Hill,[1] a pseudonym used by Fred Wise, Kathleen Twomey, and Ben Weisman. It is based on an earlier song called “Let Me Go, Devil,” about alcoholism. It was featured on the television program Studio One on November 15, 1954, and caught the fancy of the public.

Joan Weber sang the song on the TV production and was pregnant at the time. A result of the program was to illustrate how efficiently a song could be promoted by introducing it to the public via radio or a TV production. The recording was released by Columbia Records as catalog number 40366. Mitch Miller stocked national record stores the week before the program and because of its availability the record sold over 100,000 the first week of its release. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on December 4, 1954. By January 1955, Weber’s record of the song had hit No. 1 on all the Billboard charts (the Disk Jockey chart, the Best Seller chart, and the Juke Box chart).[2] The song reached No. 16 in the UK Singles Chart, and was awarded a gold record.[3]

It was also quickly covered by a number of other singers. One artist to “cover” it was Lucille Ball. In the March 18, 1955, episode of I Love Lucy, entitled “Bull Fight Dance”.

Among the cover versions was one by Patti Page. This recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70511. It first reached the Billboard charts on December 18, 1954. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at No. 8; on the Best Seller chart, at No. 24; on the Juke Box chart, at No. 12.

Another cover, by Teresa Brewer and The Lancers, was recorded on November 18, 1954, and released by Coral Records as catalog number 61315. It reached No. 6 on the Billboard chart and No. 9 on the UK Singles Chart.[4]

Peggy Lee also released the song in 1954, reaching No. 26. On the Cash Box Best-Selling Records chart, all the versions were combined, and the song was also a No. 1 hit on that chart.

Hank Snow’s version (“Let Me Go, Woman”) went to No. 1 on the country music charts in 1955.[5]

Dean Martin had the song released as a single in 1955, reaching No. 3 in the UK Singles Chart.[6]

In March 1955, Ruby Murray reached 5 in the UK Singles Chart with her version.[7]

Kathy Kirby’s version of the song went to No. 10 on the UK Singles Chart in 1964.[8]

It was also covered by Billy Fury, which turned out to one of the last songs he recorded before his death in 1983.[citation needed]

Left Right Out of Your Heart

“Left Right Out Of Your Heart” is a popular song.
The music was written by Mort Garson, the lyrics by Earl Shuman. The song was published in 1958.
The best-known version was recorded by Patti Page in 1958. This recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 71331.
It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on June 30, 1958. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at # 9; on the Best Seller chart, at # 14; on the “Hot 100” composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached # 13. “Left Right Out of Your Heart” was Page’s final Top Ten entry and certified Gold million seller until “Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte” became Page’s very last Top Ten hit and Gold million seller in 1965.
“Left Right Out of Your Heart” afforded Page a #6 hit in Australia.

I Went to Your Wedding

“I Went to Your Wedding” is a popular song written and composed by Jessie Mae Robinson and published in 1952.

The song is a report of a wedding, attended by the ex-lover of one of the parties being married, who obviously is still in love with the person to whom it is addressed. While the lines “You came down the aisle/ Wearing a smile/ A vision of loveliness” might suggest the song being directed to a female, the best-known versions of the song have been sung by female singers, presumably to male ex-lovers.

The biggest hit version was recorded by Patti Page. It was recorded on August 6, 1952, and issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5899, with the flip side “You Belong to Me.” It first entered the Billboard chart on August 22, 1952, lasting 21 weeks and reaching #1 on the chart. [1] “I Went to Your Wedding” also afforded Page a #1 hit in Australia.

Another version was recorded by the Sammy Kaye orchestra, on August 15, 1952, and issued by Columbia Records as catalog number 39856. The song was also recorded by Alma Cogan in the United Kingdom in 1952.

A country music version by Hank Snow peaked at number 3 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart in 1952.[2]

The song was then famously ‘spoofed’ by Spike Jones and his City Slickers later in the decade. The lines quoted above were altered thus: “You tripped down the aisle/ Fell flat on your (laughter) smile/ Your father was loaded too.” The male ex-lover (Jones’ vocalist) is in fact now interpreted to be glad to “get rid” of the bride! Ray Stevens covered the Spike Jones version in 2012 on the 9-CD project, The Encyclopedia of Recorded Comedy Music.

The French rendering of “I Went To Your Wedding,” re-titled “Ton mariage,” was recorded in 1953 by Lys Assia; Line Renaud and Tino Rossi also recorded versions.

Philippine singer Victor Wood performed and released a bilingual version of “I Went To Your Wedding” in which he alternated the original lyrics with Filipino ones. This particular cover became popular in the Philippines and gave some fame to the entertainer.

The song’s melody is very similar to the old Russian song Po Donu gulyaet kazak molodoi (Young Cossak went near the Don).

I’ll Remember Today

“I’ll Remember Today” is a popular song.

The music was written by Edith Piaf, the lyrics by William Engvick. First recorded by Piaf, it was later popularized by Patti Page in the United States and by Ruby Murray in the United Kingdom.

The recording by Patti Page was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 71189. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on November 11, 1957. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #23; on the Best Seller chart, at #31; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #32.

I’ll Keep the Lovelight Burning

“I’ll Keep the Lovelight Burning” is a popular song written in 1942 by Harry Tobias, Nick Kenny, and Harold Levey, [1] popularized by Patti Page in 1949. Louis Armstrong also covered the song in 1949.[2]
The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5310, and first reached the Billboard chart on September 4, 1949, lasting 8 weeks and peaking at #26.[3]

I Don’t Care if the Sun Don’t Shine

“I Don’t Care If the Sun Don’t Shine” is a popular song, written by Mack David. The most popular version was done by Patti Page in 1950. The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5396, and first reached the Billboard chart on May 20, 1950, lasting 9 weeks and peaking at #8. It was her first Top 10 hit.[1]

The song was also one of the first recordings by Elvis Presley.

A Dean Martin version of the song was featured in the 1953 film Scared Stiff starring Martin and Jerry Lewis. The Patti Page recording is featured in the movie The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. Actor Guy Pearce also briefly sings excerpts of this song in the film, as does Terence Stamp. The first Spanish-language version was recorded by Marco Tulio Sanchez, the precursor of rockabilly in his country Colombia during the 1980s.[citation needed] It was originally intended for Disney’s Cinderella but not used.[citation needed]. Canada’s Reid Jamieson covers the song on his 1950s era tribute The Presley Sessions revisited (2015)

I Cried

“I Cried” is a popular song written by Michael Elias and Billy Duke.

The best-selling version was done by Patti Page, reaching #13 on the Billboard charts in 1954. It was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70416. The song was a two-sided hit, with the flip side “What a Dream” doing even better on the chart. It entered the chart on September 1, 1954 and stayed on for 3 weeks, peaking at #26 on the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart. [1] Another version, by Tommy Leonetti, reached #30 the same year. The song reached #18 on the Cash Box best-selling record charts in that year.

The song was covered by Eddie Holman in his 1970 album, I Love You.[2]

I Can’t Tell a Waltz from a Tango

“I Can’t Tell a Waltz from a Tango” is a popular song, written by Al Hoffman and Dick Manning and published in 1954. The best-known version in the United States was recorded by Patti Page; the best-known version in the United Kingdom by Alma Cogan, both of which were recorded in 1954. The Pee Wee King Orchestra recorded the song, reviewed as a “right smooth job” in the same month as the Patti Page’s charting of the song.[1]

The Page recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70458, with the B-side “The Mama Doll Song.” It entered the Billboard chart on October 16, 1954 at number 30, the only week it charted there.[2] In Australia, “I Can’t Tell a Waltz from a Tango” afforded Page a number 14 hit.

The recording by Alma Cogan was released in 1954 by HMV as a 78rpm recording (catalog number B10786)[3] and a 45rpm recording (catalog number 7M 271). It reached number 6 on the UK Singles Chart.[4] The B-side was “Christmas Cards”.[3] The song was often used in the BBC comedy radio programme, The Goon Show, by Ray Ellington and his quartet.

Go on with the Wedding

“Go on with the Wedding” is a popular song written by Arthur Korb, Charles Purvis, and Milton Yakus and published in 1956.

The recording by Patti Page was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70766. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on January 14, 1956. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #16; on the Best Seller chart, at #17; on the Juke Box chart, at #12; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #11. “Go On with the Wedding” afforded Page a #19 hit in Australia.

The song was also recorded and charted as a duet by Kitty Kallen and Georgie Shaw.

Fibbin’

“Fibbin'” is a popular song, with music by Michael Merlo and words by Patrick Welch, written in 1958.

In the United States, the most popular version was a recording by Patti Page (Mercury Records catalog number 71355) that was made in 1958, entering the Billboard chart on September 28, 1958, lasting 9 weeks, and reaching #39 on the chart. In the United Kingdom, Petula Clark recorded the song.

(How Much Is) That Doggie in the Window?

“(How Much Is) That Doggie in the Window?” is a popular novelty song published as having been written by Bob Merrill in 1952 and very loosely based on the folk tune, Carnival of Venice. This song is also loosely based on the song “Oh, where, oh, where, has my little dog gone?” The best-known version of the song was the original, recorded by Patti Page on December 18, 1952, and released in January 1953 by Mercury Records as catalog numbers 70070 (78 rpm) and 70070X45 (45 rpm) under the title “The Doggie in the Window”, with the flip side being “My Jealous Eyes”. It reached No. 1 on both the Billboard and Cash Box charts in 1953, and sold over two million copies.[1]

Mercury, however, had poor distribution in the United Kingdom. Therefore, a recording by Lita Roza was the one most widely heard in the UK, reaching No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart in 1953.[2] It also distinguished Roza as the first British woman to have a number-one hit in the UK chart. It was also the first song to reach number 1 with a question in the title.[2]

Cross Over the Bridge

“Cross Over the Bridge” is a popular song written by Bennie Benjamin and George David Weiss and published in 1945.

The best-selling version of the song was recorded by Patti Page in 1954. Page’s release was covered at that time by the black group The Chords for Atlantic Records. Page’s was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70302, with the flip side “My Restless Lover,” and first entered the Billboard chart on February 17, 1954, staying on the chart for 23 weeks and peaking at position #2.[1]

In the United Kingdom a version was recorded by Billie Anthony and Tony Brent and released on the Columbia label.

Anne Shelton with Ken Mackintosh and his orchestra recorded their version in London on March 11, 1954. It was released by EMI on the His Master’s Voice label as catalog number B 10680.

The Norwegian swing/pop duo Bobbysocks! did a cover in 1984 on their LP Bobbysocks!.

Cross of Gold

“Croce di Oro” (“Cross of Gold”) is a popular song, written by James “Kim” Gannon.

It was popularized by Patti Page in 1955.

The Page recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70713.[1] It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on November 12, 1955. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #17; on the Best Seller chart, at #20; on the Juke Box chart, at #16; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #16.[1][2]

A United Kingdom version, recorded by Joan Regan, was also issued in the United States by London Records as catalog number 1605.[3]

On Cash Box magazine’s charts, the song (in all versions combined) reached a peak position of #15.

Conquest (song)

“Conquest” is a song written and first recorded by Corky Robbins and popularized in the 1950s by Patti Page. “Conquest” was also covered by The White Stripes on their 2007 album Icky Thump, which features Regulo Aldama on trumpet. Patti Page’s version of “Conquest” was featured on an eBay commercial in the autumn of 2007. The song was used in multiple commercials in 2013 including the Ram trucks “Got Away” advert and also the Machete Kills trailer.[1]

Confess (song)

“Confess” is a popular song written by Bennie Benjamin and George David Weiss.

The song figures in the early careers of two important female singers:

In 1947, Doris Day was making a transition from a Big band singer, most recently with Les Brown, to a solo vocalist. Her first major record away from the band was a duet with Buddy Clark, with this song on one side and “Love Somebody” on the other.[1] The record became a two-sided hit, the first two of a string of hits for Day that made her one of the top female singers in popular music.

About the same time, Mercury Records was planning to record the song as a vehicle for Frankie Laine. They were persuaded instead to give the song to a young female singer, who had not, at the time, a single hit: Patti Page. Page’s manager, Jack Rael, succeeded in getting Mercury to let her record the song, but because of a low budget, a second singer could not be hired, so Rael suggested that Page sing the second part as well. The novelty of her doing two voices on one record probably contributed to the song becoming a top 20 hit for her. This became not only the first of many hits for Patti Page, but the first song on which a singer did more than one track. For Patti Page, multi-tracking became a trademark of her style, while others, such as Les Paul and Mary Ford, as well as Jane Turzy, took up this practice too.

The Day/Clark recording was recorded on November 21, 1947, and issued by Columbia Records as catalog number 38174,[1] and first reached the Billboard chart on June 26, 1948, lasting 11 weeks and peaking at #16 on the chart.[2]

The Page recording was recorded on December 3, 1947, and released by Mercury Records as catalog number 5129, with the flip side “Twelve O’Clock Flight”[3] (also later as catalog number 5511[4]), and first reached the Billboard chart on July 2, 1948, lasting 10 weeks and peaking at #12.[2]

Come What May (1952 song)

“Come What May” is a popular song, with lyrics by Allen Schiller and music by Al Sanchez.

It was popularized by Patti Page in 1952.

The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5772 (backed with “Retreat”), and first reached the Billboard chart on February 9, 1952, lasting 13 weeks and peaking at #9. [1]

In Britain, it was covered by Lita Roza.

Changing Partners

“Changing Partners” is a pop song with music by Larry Coleman and lyrics by Joe Darion, published in 1953.

The best-known recording was made by Patti Page. It was also recorded the same year by Dinah Shore, Kay Starr and Bing Crosby.

The version by Patti Page was recorded on September 21, 1953 and released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70260. It started on the Billboard charts on November 21, 1953, staying on the chart for 21 weeks and reaching #3 in 1954.[1]

The version by Dinah Shore with Hugo Winterhalter’s orchestra and chorus was recorded on October 15, 1953 and released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-5515 (in USA) and by EMI on the His Master’s Voice label as catalog number B 10634. The American release reached #12 on the Billboard charts in 1954.[1]

The version by Kay Starr was recorded on October 22, 1953 and released by Capitol Records as catalog number 2657. It started on the Billboard charts on December 5, 1953, staying on the chart for 9 weeks and reaching #13 in 1954.[1]

The version by Bing Crosby was recorded on November 14, 1953 and released by Decca Records as catalog number 28969. It started on the Billboard charts on January 23, 1954, staying on the chart for 2 weeks and reaching #17.[1]

A version by Pee Wee King reached #4 on the country music charts in 1954.[2]

On Cash Box, where all versions were combined, it reached #4.

On Elvis Costello’s album, Secret, Profane & Sugarcane, he records a version of this song to close the album.

The 1984 Canadian film Isaac Littlefeathers opened with a recording of the Tennessee Waltz followed by a recording of Changing Partners.

The song was also featured in the 2012 film “The Master” directed by Paul Thomas Anderson.

Belonging to Someone

“Belonging to Someone” is a popular song, written by Al Hoffman and Dick Manning and published in 1958.

It was popularized by Patti Page in 1958. The Page recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 71247. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on February 10, 1958. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #13; on the Best Seller chart, at #32; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #34.

Back in Your Own Backyard

“Back in Your Own Backyard” is a popular song. Officially the credits show it as written by Al Jolson, Billy Rose, and Dave Dreyer; in fact, Billy Rose was exclusively a lyricist (see Category:Songs with lyrics by Billy Rose), Dreyer a composer,[1] and Al Jolson a performer who was often given credits so he could earn some more money, so the actual apportionment of the credits would be likely to be music by Dreyer, lyrics by Rose, and possibly some small contribution by Jolson.

A recording by Ruth Etting made on January 3, 1928 was issued by Columbia Records as catalog number 1288-D, with the flip side “When You’re with Somebody Else”.[2][3] Jolson also recorded the song in 1928, on March 8, with Bill Wirges’ Orchestra for Brunswick Records (catalog number 3867[3]) with the flip side “Ol’ Man River”.[4]

It was subsequently revived by Patti Page in a recording made on June 16, 1950. The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5463.[5] It entered the Billboard chart on October 7, 1950, at #23, lasting only that one week.[6]

It has also been recorded by many other singers, including Billie Holiday, as well as Bing Crosby on CBS radio.

Another Time, Another Place (song)

“Another Time, Another Place” is a popular song.

The music was written by Jay Livingston, the lyrics by Ray Evans. The song was published in 1958.

It was featured in the movie of the same name. It was popularized by Patti Page in 1958. The Page recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 71294. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on May 5, 1958. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #20; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #81.[1]

And So to Sleep Again

“And So to Sleep Again” is a popular song, written in 1951 by Joe Marsala and Sunny Skylar.

It was popularized by Patti Page in 1951.

The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5706, and first reached the Billboard chart on September 22, 1951, lasting 16 weeks and peaking at #4. [1]

It was also recorded in America by Dick Haymes, April Stevens and Margaret Whiting, and British covers were recorded by Jimmy Young and Dorothy Squires. It peaked at #21 in the British sheet music charts.

Allegheny Moon

Allegheny Moon is a popular song written by Al Hoffman and Dick Manning and published in 1956.

The song is best known in a 1956 recording by Patti Page. This recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70878, with the flip side The Strangest Romance. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on June 16, 1956. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #2; on the Best Seller chart, at #5; on the Juke Box chart, at #2; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #2.[1] The song was also a hit in Australia peaking at #3.

All My Love (Patti Page song)

“All My Love” is a 1950 popular song. The subtitle, in brackets, is Bolero. The music was written by Paul Durand. French lyrics were written by Henri Contet, the English lyrics by Mitchell Parish.

It was popularized by Patti Page in 1950. The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5455, and first reached the Billboard chart on August 26, 1950, lasting 22 weeks and peaking at #1. It was her first #1 hit.[1]

The much-covered hit was also popular in 1950 in versions by Guy Lombardo (reached the No. 10 position in the Billboard charts), Percy Faith (No. 7 position), Bing Crosby (No. 11 position) and Dennis Day (No. 22 position). [2]

Caterina Valente also recorded the song for Decca Records in 1958.[3]

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