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Would I Love You (Love You, Love You)

“Would I Love You (Love You, Love You)” is a popular song with music by Harold Spina and lyrics by Bob Russell. It was published in 1950.

It was popularized by Patti Page in a recording made on January 2, 1951. The recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5571, and first reached the Billboard chart on February 10, 1951, lasting 19 weeks and peaking at #4. [1]

Another recording was made by Doris Day with Harry James. It was issued by Columbia Records as catalog number 39159 with the flip side “Lullaby of Broadway.” It reached #19 on the Billboard chart, lasting 10 weeks beginning on March 2, 1951. [1]

A version by Tony Martin also charted. This recording was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-4056. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on February 23, 1951 and lasted 4 weeks on the chart, peaking at #25. [1]

Wondering (Patti Page song)

“Wondering” is a popular song.

The recording by Patti Page was written by Jack Schafer and released by Mercury Records as catalog number 71101. It first reached the Billboard magazine charts on June 3, 1957. On the Disk Jockey chart, it peaked at #12; on the composite chart of the top 100 songs, it reached #35. The flip side was “Old Cape Cod.”

What a Dream

“What a Dream” is a popular song. It was written by Chuck Willis and was published in 1954. the original recording was by Ruth Brown.

A cover by Patti Page was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70416. It first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on August 4, 1954, and lasted 11 weeks on the chart, peaking at #18. [1] The song was a two-sided hit, with the flip side, “I Cried”, also charting.

The Wall (1957 song)

“The Wall” is a popular song, written by Oramay Diamond, Clyde Otis, and Dave Dreyer.

It was most successfully popularized by Patti Page in 1957. The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 71059, (the flip side of “A Poor Man’s Roses (or a Rich Man’s Gold)”) and first reached the Billboard chart on March 6, 1957, lasting 6 weeks and peaking at #43.

Other 1957 recordings were made by Eileen Rodgers as Columbia Records catalog number 40850 (which peaked at #64), and by Brook Benton as Epic Records 9199.

Shirley Bassey recorded the track at this time whilst in New York, and it was issued in 1959 on the album The Bewitching Miss Bassey. The song can be found on an CD compilation album called Easy To Love issued by Motif Records in 2010, which features the later Bassey recordings for the Philips Records label.

On the Cash Box Best-Selling Records charts, where multiple versions of a song were always combined, the song lasted 5 weeks and peaked at #42.

This Is My Song (1951 song)

“This Is My Song” is a popular song.

It was composed by Dick Charles, a pseudonym of Richard Charles Krieg, on August 23, 1950, and published on December 31, 1951.[1]

It was recorded by Patti Page in 1953, and issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 70183. It entered the Billboard chart on August 8, 1953, at #20, lasting only that one week.[2] The song also became Patti Page’s television theme song.[1]

Tennessee Waltz

“Tennessee Waltz” is a popular country music song with lyrics by Redd Stewart and music by Pee Wee King[1] written in 1946 and first released in January 1948. The song became a multimillion seller via a 1950 recording – as “The Tennessee Waltz” – by Patti Page. As of 1974, it was the biggest selling song ever in Japan.[2]

All versions of the lyrics narrate a situation in which the persona has introduced his or her sweetheart to a friend who then waltzes away with her or him. The lyrics are altered for pronoun gender on the basis of the sex of the singer.

The popularity of “Tennessee Waltz” also made it the fourth official song of the state of Tennessee in 1965.[3]

So in Love

“So in Love” is a popular song, written by Cole Porter, from his musical Kiss Me, Kate, (opening on Broadway in 1948)[1] based on Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew. It was sung in the show by Patricia Morison, reprised by Alfred Drake[1] and further popularized by Patti Page in 1949.

The Page recording was issued by Mercury Records as catalog number 5230,[1][2] and first reached the Billboard chart on February 12, 1949, lasting two weeks and peaking at No. 13.[3]

Other versions which were popular that year were by Gordon MacRae and Dinah Shore.[1]

The song has been recorded by many other significant female singers, including Peggy Lee and Ella Fitzgerald.

Once in a While (1937 song)

“Once in a While” is a popular song, written by Michael Edwards with lyrics by Bud Green. The song was published in 1937.

The song is a much-recorded standard. Tommy Dorsey’s recording in 1937 went to number one in the United States.[1] One of the best-known recordings was made by Patti Page in 1952 (on Mercury 5867). The song was revived in doo-wop style by the Chimes in 1960, and their version peaked at number eleven on the Billboard Hot 100 in January 1961.[1]

Old Cape Cod

“Old Cape Cod” is a song, written by Claire Rothrock, Milton Yakus, and Allan Jeffrey, and published in 1957. The single, as recorded by Patti Page, became a gold record, having sold over a million copies. Having been hailed by “Cape Codders” as the “unofficial Cape Cod Anthem, if ever there was one”,[1] the song has been credited with “putting the Cape on the map” and helping to establish Cape Cod as a major tourist destination.[2]

Most People Get Married

“Most People Get Married” is a popular song.

The music was written by Leon Carr, the lyrics by Earl Shuman. The song was published in 1962.

A version by Patti Page charted in 1962, reaching #27 on the Billboard magazine charts. The presence of Patti Page brought the rockabilly-tinged song to the easy listening survey, where it peaked at #8.

The song was also recorded by Joan Regan in the United Kingdom.

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