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You’re My Best Friend (Queen song)

“You’re My Best Friend” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by bass guitarist John Deacon. It was originally included on the album A Night at the Opera in 1975, and later released as a single. In the US, “You’re My Best Friend” went to number sixteen.[2] The song also appeared on the Live Killers (1979) live album and on the compilation albums Greatest Hits (1981), Absolute Greatest (2009) and Queen Forever (2014).

You Don’t Fool Me

“You Don’t Fool Me” is a song by Queen, from the 1995 album Made in Heaven. It was released as a single in 1996, containing various remixes of the song. The song is one of the few which were actually written and recorded after the Innuendo sessions, and was written and composed by the band, under David Richards’ supervision. It was a worldwide hit and reached the peak of the single charts in Italy.

“You Don’t Fool Me” was one of the last tracks recorded for the album Made in Heaven and came about in a most unusual way. May has explained on his website[citation needed] that the producer for the band, David Richards, more or less created the framework of the song single handedly, building from bits of lyrics recorded just before Mercury’s death. May has said that before Richards’ work, there was no song to speak of. However, after Richards edited and mixed the song (including a bit of harmonies recorded for “A Winter’s Tale”), he presented it to the remaining members of the band. Brian May, Roger Taylor, and John Deacon then added their instruments and backing vocals and were surprised to end up with a finished song that had begun as nothing. The style of the song is reminiscent of their 1982 album Hot Space, and a comment over that featured on their Greatest Hits III album.

We Will Rock You

“We Will Rock You” is a song written by Brian May and recorded by Queen for their 1977 album News of the World.[2] Rolling Stone ranked it number 330 of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” in 2004,[3] and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) placed it at number 146 on its list of Songs of the Century. In 2009, “We Will Rock You” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[4][5]

Other than the last 30 seconds containing a guitar solo by May, the song is generally set in a cappella form, using only stomping and clapping as a rhythmic body percussion beat. In 1977, “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions” were issued together as a worldwide top ten single.[6] Soon after the album was released, many radio stations began playing the songs consecutively and without interruption.[7]

Since its release, “We Will Rock You” has been covered, remixed, sampled, parodied, referenced and used by multiple recording artists, TV shows, films and other media worldwide.[8][9] Since its release, the song has become a cliche at sports events around the world as a stadium anthem, mostly due to its simple rhythm.[10][11]

A Winter’s Tale (Queen song)

“A Winter’s Tale” is a song by Queen, from the album Made in Heaven, released in 1995 after Freddie Mercury’s death in 1991. It was written after the Innuendo sessions, inspired as Mercury was staring out the windows of his hospital, at Lake Geneva. The song has a psychedelic, dreamy feel, and describes what Mercury saw outside the windows.

Freddie wrote, composed, and did the vocals and keyboards for it. In the documentary “Queen – Champions of the World”, it was stated that this was, if not the first, then an extremely rare style of recording for Freddie, as it was all performed in one take live in the studio. It was stated in the film that Freddie had always insisted upon music being completed prior to the vocal arrangement beginning, but acknowledged that he had little time left and there was not enough time to work on it differently.

The song was released as the second single from the album. In the UK the single was also available in a special limited edition green paper CD case which resembled Christmas wrapping.

Who Wants to Live Forever

“Who Wants to Live Forever” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It is the sixth track on the album A Kind of Magic, released in June 1986, and was written by lead guitarist Brian May for the soundtrack to the film Highlander.[1] The song peaked at No. 24 in the UK charts.[2]

The song is used to frame the scenes in the film where Connor MacLeod must endure his beloved wife Heather MacLeod growing old and dying while he, as an Immortal, remains forever young. (It was later used in the episodes “The Gathering”, “Revenge is Sweet”, “The Hunters”, “Line of Fire”, and “Leader of the Pack” of the Highlander television series). The song’s title is taken from a line in another movie scored by Brian May and Queen, Flash Gordon (the line can be heard on “Battle Theme” from the Flash Gordon soundtrack album) and is based on May’s personal troubles[3] (the death of May’s father and failing first marriage).

In the film, Freddie Mercury provides all the main vocals, while May sings lead vocals on the first verse on the album version, before Mercury takes over for most of the rest of the song, with May singing “But touch my tears with your lips” during Mercury’s verse and then the final line of the song, “Who waits forever anyway?”. An instrumental version of the song, titled “Forever”, was included as a bonus track on the CD version of the album. This instrumental featured only a piano, with keyboard accompaniment during the chorus sections. The piano track was recorded solely by May. Queen was backed up by an orchestra, with orchestrations by the co-composer of the film’s score, Michael Kamen.[1] Since its release, the song has been covered by a number of artists.

We Are the Champions

“We Are the Champions” is a song by the British rock band Queen, first released on their 1977 album News of the World.[1] Written by lead singer Freddie Mercury, it is one of Queen’s most popular songs, and one of rock’s most recognisable anthems.[2]

The song was a worldwide success, reaching number two in the UK Singles Chart, and number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States.[3][4] In 2009, “We Are the Champions” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame,[5] and was voted the world’s favourite song in a 2005 Sony Ericsson world music poll.[6] In 2011, a team of scientific researchers concluded that the song was the catchiest in the history of popular music.[7]

“We Are the Champions” has become an anthem for victories at sporting events,[2] including as official theme song for 1994 FIFA World Cup, and has been often used or referenced in popular culture. The song has also been covered by many artists.

Under Pressure

“Under Pressure” is a 1981 song by the British rock band Queen which was written and recorded in collaboration with the singer David Bowie. It was included on Queen’s 1982 album Hot Space. The song reached number one on the UK Singles Chart, becoming the group’s second number-one hit in their home country (after 1975’s “Bohemian Rhapsody”, which topped the chart for nine weeks), and Bowie’s third UK number-one. The song only peaked at No. 29 on the US Billboard Hot 100, and would re-chart for one week at No. 45 in the US following Bowie’s death in January 2016. It was also number 31 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of the ’80s.[1]

The song was played live at every Queen concert from 1981 until the end of Queen’s touring career in 1986.[2][3][4] It is recorded on the live albums Queen Rock Montreal and Live at Wembley ’86.[5][6] The song was included on some editions of Queen’s first Greatest Hits compilations, such as the original 1981 Elektra release in the US. It is included on the band’s compilation albums Greatest Hits II, Classic Queen, and Absolute Greatest[7] as well as Bowie compilations such as Best of Bowie (2002),[8] The Platinum Collection (2005) and Nothing Has Changed (2014).

Too Much Love Will Kill You

“Too Much Love Will Kill You” is a song written by British guitarist Brian May of Queen, Frank Musker, and Elizabeth Lamers.[1] The song reflected the breakdown of May’s first marriage and attraction to his future wife, Anita Dobson.[2] It was first recorded by Queen around 1988 or before, and was intended to be on the band’s The Miracle album in 1989, but did not make the cut due to legal disputes following the band’s decision that all songs on the album would be written by the group as oppose to individuals. After Freddie Mercury’s death in 1991, May arranged a solo version, which he performed at the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert in 1992,[3] and subsequently included on his solo album Back to the Light that same year. Released as a single, it reached No. 5 on the UK Singles Chart. Because it was first played publicly at The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, a common misconception is that it was written as a tribute to Freddie Mercury, although it had actually been written several years before he died.

The song also appeared on the 1992 compilation album Now That’s What I Call Music! 23.

Tie Your Mother Down

“Tie Your Mother Down” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by lead guitarist Brian May. It is the opening track and the second single from their 1976 album A Day at the Races. On its original release as a single in 1977 the song peaked at 31 in the UK Singles Chart, however more than 20 years later it was released as a double a-side to “No-One But You (Only the Good Die Young)” where it reached 13 in UK Singles Chart. On the album the song is preceded by a one-minute instrumental intro featuring a Shepard tone melody, which is reprised in the ending of “Teo Torriatte”: this was intended to create a “circle” in the album, typical, for example, of Pink Floyd’s albums.

After its release in 1976, it was played by Queen on every subsequent tour.[1] At the 1992 Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, the song was co-performed by Queen and guests Joe Elliot and Slash.[2] On several occasions in the recent years, Brian May and Roger Taylor have played this song live with the Foo Fighters, including performances at Queen’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 2001, and the VH1 Rock Honors in 2006.

These Are the Days of Our Lives

“These Are the Days of Our Lives” is a song by the British rock band Queen. Although credited to the whole band, it was largely written by their drummer Roger Taylor, and is the eighth track on the band’s 1991 album Innuendo.[1] Keyboards were programmed by the four band members in the studio, and conga percussion (a synthesised conga) was recorded by their producer David Richards (although it was mimed in the video by Roger Taylor).

It was released as a single in the United States on Freddie Mercury’s 45th birthday, 5 September 1991, and as double A-side single in the UK three months later on 9 December, in the wake of Mercury’s death, with the seminal Queen track “Bohemian Rhapsody”. The single debuted at #1 on the UK Singles Chart, and remained at the top for five weeks.[2] The song was awarded a BRIT Award for “Best Single” in 1992.[3]

“These Are the Days of Our Lives” hearkens back to similarly themed 1975 Queen song “Love of My Life”, twice using the line “I still love you”. At the end of the song, Mercury simply speaks those words, as he would often do in live versions of “Love of My Life.”[4]

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