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You’re My Best Friend (Queen song)

“You’re My Best Friend” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by bass guitarist John Deacon. It was originally included on the album A Night at the Opera in 1975, and later released as a single. In the US, “You’re My Best Friend” went to number sixteen.[2] The song also appeared on the Live Killers (1979) live album and on the compilation albums Greatest Hits (1981), Absolute Greatest (2009) and Queen Forever (2014).

You Don’t Fool Me

“You Don’t Fool Me” is a song by Queen, from the 1995 album Made in Heaven. It was released as a single in 1996, containing various remixes of the song. The song is one of the few which were actually written and recorded after the Innuendo sessions, and was written and composed by the band, under David Richards’ supervision. It was a worldwide hit and reached the peak of the single charts in Italy.

“You Don’t Fool Me” was one of the last tracks recorded for the album Made in Heaven and came about in a most unusual way. May has explained on his website[citation needed] that the producer for the band, David Richards, more or less created the framework of the song single handedly, building from bits of lyrics recorded just before Mercury’s death. May has said that before Richards’ work, there was no song to speak of. However, after Richards edited and mixed the song (including a bit of harmonies recorded for “A Winter’s Tale”), he presented it to the remaining members of the band. Brian May, Roger Taylor, and John Deacon then added their instruments and backing vocals and were surprised to end up with a finished song that had begun as nothing. The style of the song is reminiscent of their 1982 album Hot Space, and a comment over that featured on their Greatest Hits III album.

We Will Rock You

“We Will Rock You” is a song written by Brian May and recorded by Queen for their 1977 album News of the World.[2] Rolling Stone ranked it number 330 of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” in 2004,[3] and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) placed it at number 146 on its list of Songs of the Century. In 2009, “We Will Rock You” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[4][5]

Other than the last 30 seconds containing a guitar solo by May, the song is generally set in a cappella form, using only stomping and clapping as a rhythmic body percussion beat. In 1977, “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions” were issued together as a worldwide top ten single.[6] Soon after the album was released, many radio stations began playing the songs consecutively and without interruption.[7]

Since its release, “We Will Rock You” has been covered, remixed, sampled, parodied, referenced and used by multiple recording artists, TV shows, films and other media worldwide.[8][9] Since its release, the song has become a cliche at sports events around the world as a stadium anthem, mostly due to its simple rhythm.[10][11]

A Winter’s Tale (Queen song)

“A Winter’s Tale” is a song by Queen, from the album Made in Heaven, released in 1995 after Freddie Mercury’s death in 1991. It was written after the Innuendo sessions, inspired as Mercury was staring out the windows of his hospital, at Lake Geneva. The song has a psychedelic, dreamy feel, and describes what Mercury saw outside the windows.

Freddie wrote, composed, and did the vocals and keyboards for it. In the documentary “Queen – Champions of the World”, it was stated that this was, if not the first, then an extremely rare style of recording for Freddie, as it was all performed in one take live in the studio. It was stated in the film that Freddie had always insisted upon music being completed prior to the vocal arrangement beginning, but acknowledged that he had little time left and there was not enough time to work on it differently.

The song was released as the second single from the album. In the UK the single was also available in a special limited edition green paper CD case which resembled Christmas wrapping.

Who Wants to Live Forever

“Who Wants to Live Forever” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It is the sixth track on the album A Kind of Magic, released in June 1986, and was written by lead guitarist Brian May for the soundtrack to the film Highlander.[1] The song peaked at No. 24 in the UK charts.[2]

The song is used to frame the scenes in the film where Connor MacLeod must endure his beloved wife Heather MacLeod growing old and dying while he, as an Immortal, remains forever young. (It was later used in the episodes “The Gathering”, “Revenge is Sweet”, “The Hunters”, “Line of Fire”, and “Leader of the Pack” of the Highlander television series). The song’s title is taken from a line in another movie scored by Brian May and Queen, Flash Gordon (the line can be heard on “Battle Theme” from the Flash Gordon soundtrack album) and is based on May’s personal troubles[3] (the death of May’s father and failing first marriage).

In the film, Freddie Mercury provides all the main vocals, while May sings lead vocals on the first verse on the album version, before Mercury takes over for most of the rest of the song, with May singing “But touch my tears with your lips” during Mercury’s verse and then the final line of the song, “Who waits forever anyway?”. An instrumental version of the song, titled “Forever”, was included as a bonus track on the CD version of the album. This instrumental featured only a piano, with keyboard accompaniment during the chorus sections. The piano track was recorded solely by May. Queen was backed up by an orchestra, with orchestrations by the co-composer of the film’s score, Michael Kamen.[1] Since its release, the song has been covered by a number of artists.

We Are the Champions

“We Are the Champions” is a song by the British rock band Queen, first released on their 1977 album News of the World.[1] Written by lead singer Freddie Mercury, it is one of Queen’s most popular songs, and one of rock’s most recognisable anthems.[2]

The song was a worldwide success, reaching number two in the UK Singles Chart, and number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States.[3][4] In 2009, “We Are the Champions” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame,[5] and was voted the world’s favourite song in a 2005 Sony Ericsson world music poll.[6] In 2011, a team of scientific researchers concluded that the song was the catchiest in the history of popular music.[7]

“We Are the Champions” has become an anthem for victories at sporting events,[2] including as official theme song for 1994 FIFA World Cup, and has been often used or referenced in popular culture. The song has also been covered by many artists.

Under Pressure

“Under Pressure” is a 1981 song by the British rock band Queen which was written and recorded in collaboration with the singer David Bowie. It was included on Queen’s 1982 album Hot Space. The song reached number one on the UK Singles Chart, becoming the group’s second number-one hit in their home country (after 1975’s “Bohemian Rhapsody”, which topped the chart for nine weeks), and Bowie’s third UK number-one. The song only peaked at No. 29 on the US Billboard Hot 100, and would re-chart for one week at No. 45 in the US following Bowie’s death in January 2016. It was also number 31 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of the ’80s.[1]

The song was played live at every Queen concert from 1981 until the end of Queen’s touring career in 1986.[2][3][4] It is recorded on the live albums Queen Rock Montreal and Live at Wembley ’86.[5][6] The song was included on some editions of Queen’s first Greatest Hits compilations, such as the original 1981 Elektra release in the US. It is included on the band’s compilation albums Greatest Hits II, Classic Queen, and Absolute Greatest[7] as well as Bowie compilations such as Best of Bowie (2002),[8] The Platinum Collection (2005) and Nothing Has Changed (2014).

Too Much Love Will Kill You

“Too Much Love Will Kill You” is a song written by British guitarist Brian May of Queen, Frank Musker, and Elizabeth Lamers.[1] The song reflected the breakdown of May’s first marriage and attraction to his future wife, Anita Dobson.[2] It was first recorded by Queen around 1988 or before, and was intended to be on the band’s The Miracle album in 1989, but did not make the cut due to legal disputes following the band’s decision that all songs on the album would be written by the group as oppose to individuals. After Freddie Mercury’s death in 1991, May arranged a solo version, which he performed at the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert in 1992,[3] and subsequently included on his solo album Back to the Light that same year. Released as a single, it reached No. 5 on the UK Singles Chart. Because it was first played publicly at The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, a common misconception is that it was written as a tribute to Freddie Mercury, although it had actually been written several years before he died.

The song also appeared on the 1992 compilation album Now That’s What I Call Music! 23.

Tie Your Mother Down

“Tie Your Mother Down” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by lead guitarist Brian May. It is the opening track and the second single from their 1976 album A Day at the Races. On its original release as a single in 1977 the song peaked at 31 in the UK Singles Chart, however more than 20 years later it was released as a double a-side to “No-One But You (Only the Good Die Young)” where it reached 13 in UK Singles Chart. On the album the song is preceded by a one-minute instrumental intro featuring a Shepard tone melody, which is reprised in the ending of “Teo Torriatte”: this was intended to create a “circle” in the album, typical, for example, of Pink Floyd’s albums.

After its release in 1976, it was played by Queen on every subsequent tour.[1] At the 1992 Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, the song was co-performed by Queen and guests Joe Elliot and Slash.[2] On several occasions in the recent years, Brian May and Roger Taylor have played this song live with the Foo Fighters, including performances at Queen’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 2001, and the VH1 Rock Honors in 2006.

These Are the Days of Our Lives

“These Are the Days of Our Lives” is a song by the British rock band Queen. Although credited to the whole band, it was largely written by their drummer Roger Taylor, and is the eighth track on the band’s 1991 album Innuendo.[1] Keyboards were programmed by the four band members in the studio, and conga percussion (a synthesised conga) was recorded by their producer David Richards (although it was mimed in the video by Roger Taylor).

It was released as a single in the United States on Freddie Mercury’s 45th birthday, 5 September 1991, and as double A-side single in the UK three months later on 9 December, in the wake of Mercury’s death, with the seminal Queen track “Bohemian Rhapsody”. The single debuted at #1 on the UK Singles Chart, and remained at the top for five weeks.[2] The song was awarded a BRIT Award for “Best Single” in 1992.[3]

“These Are the Days of Our Lives” hearkens back to similarly themed 1975 Queen song “Love of My Life”, twice using the line “I still love you”. At the end of the song, Mercury simply speaks those words, as he would often do in live versions of “Love of My Life.”[4]

Thank God It’s Christmas

“Thank God It’s Christmas” is a Christmas single by the British rock band Queen. It was written by lead guitarist Brian May and drummer Roger Taylor.

Released on 26 November 1984, the single spent six weeks in the UK charts over Christmas 1984 and new year of 1985, and peaked at number 21.[1]

The song was not originally released on any Queen studio album, appearing only on Queen’s Greatest Hits III, released in 1999, and as the B-side of the single “A Winter’s Tale” from the 1995 album Made in Heaven. However, the track was finally included on the bonus EP packaged with the deluxe edition of their album The Works, remastered and re-released in 2011.

No promotional video was filmed for the track, hampering its future use on music TV channels. For that reason it is a lesser known Christmas single. The song appears on several Christmas compilation albums. One of them is the original Now That’s What I Call Christmas compilation released in 1985 but deleted in 1989.

It appears on the Christmas compilation LP The Edge Of Christmas in its full 12″ version with the drum intro. It also appears on the US-only compilation boxed-set The Queen Collection, which consisted of a re-release of the LPs Classic Queen and Queen’s Greatest Hits along with a bonus CD called Queen Talks that included this song, along with a 1989 interview with the band.[citation needed]

Teo Torriatte (Let Us Cling Together)

“Teo Torriatte (Let Us Cling Together)” (手をとりあって Te o Toriatte?) is a song by Queen from their 1976 album A Day at the Races. Written by guitarist Brian May, it is the closing track on the album.

The song is notable for having two choruses sung entirely in Japanese, and it was released as a single exclusively in Japan, reaching #49 on the charts.[1] (The B-side was “Good Old-Fashioned Lover Boy”.) This song features a plastic piano and harmonium, both which are played by May. They brought in a local choir to sing the chorus at the end. On the album, the song is concluded by a one-minute instrumental intro featuring a Shepard tone melody, which is actually a reprise of the beginning of “Tie Your Mother Down”: this was intended to create a “circle” in the album, typical, for example, of Pink Floyd’s albums.

It was performed live in Tokyo during the Jazz tour in 1979 and again when the band visited Japan during The Game and Hot Space tours in 1981 and 1982 respectively.

“Teo Torriatte” was covered by Japanese singer Kokia on her 2008 Christmas album Christmas Gift, and by Mêlée in 2010 and can be found on the Japanese version of their album The Masquerade released in Japan on 18 August 2010. Andre Matos (former Angra singer) covered the song on the Japanese Edition of his 2010 effort Mentalize. Queen’s version is also one of 38 songs included on the benefit album, Songs for Japan (compiled in response to the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in Tōhoku), released on 25 March 2011.

Staying Power

“Staying Power” is the first track on Queen’s 1982 album Hot Space. It was written by lead singer Freddie Mercury and is notable as being the only Queen song to have a horn section, which was arranged by Arif Mardin. The song is driven by a funk-styled bass riff (played by Mercury) beginning in D minor and modulating to E minor throughout the song. John Deacon does not play bass on this song—instead playing rhythm guitar on a Fender Telecaster. Roger Taylor programmed a Linn LM-1 drum machine for the track. Brian May is on his Red Special. In a Stylus review of the album, critic Anthony Miccio described the song’s style as “an electro-disco track with frenetic horns.”[1]

The song was released as a single in Japan, the US and Poland where it reached #21.

Spread Your Wings

“Spread Your Wings” is a ballad by the rock band Queen, from their 1977 album News of the World.[1] Written by bassist John Deacon, it was released as the A side of the single Spread Your Wings/Sheer Heart Attack in 1978. It features Freddie Mercury on the piano and vocals, Brian May on the electric guitar, Roger Taylor on the drums, and John Deacon on the bass guitar. A live version of the song appears in the band’s 1979 album Live Killers.[1] The song peaked at number 34 in the UK.

The song is in 4/4 meter, and starts with a simple piano motif in D. It is written in D Major, then modulating up to D’s relative minor, B minor in the bridge, coming down to D in the chorus.

The lyrics of the song describe a troubled young man named Sammy who works at The Emerald Bar, sweeping the floor.[2] The narrator (Freddie Mercury) of the song encourages Sammy to pursue his dreams, telling him to “spread your wings and fly away”.[2]

“Spread Your Wings” was not released as a single in North America. It was, however, featured as a B-side to Queen’s 1980 hit, “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” (#1 U.S.).

Somebody to Love (Queen song)

“Somebody to Love” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by the lead singer Freddie Mercury. It debuted on the band’s fifth album A Day at the Races (1976), and was also featured on their greatest hits compilation album Greatest Hits (1981).[1]

The song offers listeners something similar to that of Queen’s earlier hit “Bohemian Rhapsody” with its complex harmonies and guitar solos; however instead of mimicking an English choir, the band turned to a gospel choir. It reached #2 in the UK and #13 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US.[2][3] This song made it clear to fans that “Queen could swing as hard as it could rock, by channeling the spirit of gospel music.”[4]

Written by Mercury at the piano, “Somebody to Love” is a soul-searching piece that questions God’s role in a life without love. Mercury’s fascination with, and admiration for, Aretha Franklin was a major influence in the creation of the song. Through voice layering techniques, Queen was able to create the soulful sound of a 100-voice choir with only three voices: Mercury, Brian May and Roger Taylor. John Deacon did not sing backing vocals during the recording of the album.

Queen played “Somebody to Love” live between 1977–85, and a live performance of the song is included on the album Queen Rock Montreal.[5] In addition to these live performances, there has been collaboration on tributes to “Somebody to Love” after Mercury’s death in 1991. The song was played live on 20 April 1992, during The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, with George Michael on lead vocals.[6]

The song was used in a 2016 Honda commercial for its Ridgeline pickup truck that aired during the U.S. broadcast of Super Bowl 50.[7]

The Show Must Go On (Queen song)

“The Show Must Go On” is a song by the British rock band Queen, featured as the twelfth and final track on their 1991 album Innuendo. It is credited to Queen, but written mainly by Brian May. The song chronicles the effort of Freddie Mercury continuing to perform despite approaching the end of his life; he was dying from complications due to HIV/AIDS, although his illness had not yet been made public in spite of ongoing media speculation claiming that he was seriously ill.[1] Mercury was so ill when the band recorded the song in 1990, that May had concerns as to whether he was physically capable of singing it. Recalling Mercury’s performance, May states; “I said, ‘Fred, I don’t know if this is going to be possible to sing.’ And he went, ‘I’ll fucking do it, darling’ — vodka down — and went in and killed it, completely lacerated that vocal.”[2]

It was released as a single in the United Kingdom on 14 October 1991 in promotion for the Greatest Hits II album, just six weeks before Mercury died. Following Mercury’s death on 24 November 1991, the song re-entered the British charts and spent as many weeks in the top 75 (five) as it did upon its original release, initially reaching a peak of 16. A live version with Elton John on vocals appeared on Queen’s Greatest Hits III album.

The song was first played live on 20 April 1992, during The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, performed by the three remaining members of Queen, with Elton John singing lead vocals and Black Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi playing rhythm guitar.[3] It has since been played live by Queen + Paul Rodgers with Rodgers citing one of the performances as the best of his career. Since its release, the song has appeared on television, film, and has been covered by a number of artists.

Seven Seas of Rhye

“Seven Seas of Rhye” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It was primarily written by Freddie Mercury, with Brian May contributing the second middle-eight. The song is officially credited to Mercury only. A rudimentary instrumental version appears as the final track on the group’s debut album Queen (1973), with the final version on the follow-up Queen II (1974).[2] The completed version served as the band’s third single, the earliest-released song to appear on their Greatest Hits album, with the exception of some versions where their first single, “Keep Yourself Alive”, is included.

Initially Seven Seas of Rhye was simply an “instrumental musical sketch closing their first album”.[3] An expanded rendition, planned for inclusion on the album Queen II, was publicly premiered when Queen was offered a sudden chance to appear on Top of the Pops in February 1974, and was rushed to vinyl a mere 2 days later on 23 February.[3] It became their first chart entry after gaining airtime on BBC Radio 1,[3] peaking at number 10 on the UK Singles Chart,[4] which in turn persuaded Freddie Mercury to take up Queen as his full-time career.[3]

The song was dropped from the live set in 1976 and wasn’t played in concert again until the Works tour eight years later.

It was the opening song of the set[5] at the first performance of the Queen + Adam Lambert’s tour of Asia in Tel Aviv’s Park HaYarkon in Israel.

 

Scandal (song)

“Scandal” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It was released as the fourth single from their 1989 album The Miracle and peaked at #25 in the UK.[1] The single was released in the United States but failed to chart.

“Scandal”, written by Brian May, but credited to Queen, is about the unwanted attention May and lead singer Freddie Mercury received from the press in the late 1980s, involving May’s divorce from his first wife, Chrissie Mullen, and his relationship with actress Anita Dobson and growing media speculation about Mercury’s health. Mercury had tested positive for HIV in 1987, and did not announce he was suffering from the virus until the day before his death in November 1991, but changes in his appearance, particularly weight loss, helped fuel speculation that he was seriously ill.[2]

May recorded the keyboards and guitars in one take. Mercury’s vocal was also done in one take.[2]

The video for the song featured the band performing on a stage designed to look like a newspaper – it was filmed at Pinewood Studios in September 1989, and is notable for Mercury’s “gaunt” appearance.
In the audio commentary included with the video in Queen: Greatest Video Hits 2, Roger Taylor stated: “Not one of my favourite songs. One of the most boring videos we ever made.”

Save Me (Queen song)

“Save Me” is a song by the British rock band Queen from their 1980 album The Game. Written by guitarist Brian May, it was recorded in 1979, and released in the UK on 25 January 1980, nearly six months prior to the release of the album. “Save Me” spent six weeks on the UK Singles Chart, peaking at number eleven.[1]

The song was played live from 1979 to 1982[2][3][4][5] and was recorded for their live albums, Queen Rock Montreal at the Montreal Forum, Quebec, Canada in November 1981 and Queen on Fire – Live at the Bowl at the Milton Keynes Bowl, Buckinghamshire, England in June 1982.[6] The song is also included on Queen’s Greatest Hits[7] and Queen Forever albums.

Ride the Wild Wind

“Ride the Wild Wind” is a song by British rock band Queen. The song was written by Roger Taylor and sung by Freddie Mercury was originally released on their fourteenth studio album Innuendo in 1991. In Poland, it was released as a single, peaking at No. 1.[1] On Last.fm the song has more than 62,000 hits.[2]

“Ride the Wild Wind” is written in the key of C Major with a mix of D minor and A minor.[3] The song was composed by Taylor, who recorded a demo with his own vocals. The definitive version is sung by Mercury with Taylor on backing vocals. The song is a sort of sequel of Taylor’s A Night at the Opera composition, “I’m in Love with My Car”, which focused on Taylor’s passion for cars and race. This time, the song involved all of the other members, that gave life to a fast song with beating drums and rhythmic bass line, eerily note-for-note similar to The Smiths’ “Shakespeare’s Sister”, which create the sensation of speed and engine’s roar. In the mid-part, a May solo, which accentuates the sense of high velocity, and also gives the song a heavier sound. In some parts, an Audi Quattro S1 Group B rally car can be heard.

Radio Ga Ga

“Radio Ga Ga” is a 1984 song performed and recorded by the British rock band Queen, written by their drummer Roger Taylor. It was released as a single with “I Go Crazy” by Brian May on the original B-side (3:42) and was included on the album The Works. The song also features on the band’s compilation albums, Greatest Hits II, and Classic Queen.[4]

The single was a worldwide success for the band, reaching number one in 19 countries, number 2 in the UK Singles Chart and the Australian ARIA Chart, and number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US.[5][6] The band performed the song at every concert from 1984 to their last concert with lead singer Freddie Mercury in 1986, with their most notable performance at Live Aid in 1985.[7][8][9][10]

Hot Space

Hot Space is the tenth studio album by the British rock band Queen, released on 21 May 1982. Marking a notable shift in direction from their earlier work, they employed many elements of disco, funk, rhythm and blues, dance and pop music on the album.[1][2] This made the album less popular with fans who preferred the traditional rock style they had come to associate with the band.[1]

Queen’s decision to record a dance-oriented album germinated with the massive success in the US of their 1980 hit “Another One Bites the Dust” (and to a lesser extent, the UK success of the song too).[2]

“Under Pressure”, Queen’s collaboration with David Bowie, was released in 1981 and became the band’s second #1 hit in the UK.[3] Though included on Hot Space, the song was a separate project and recorded ahead of the album, before the controversy over Queen’s new sound (disco-influenced rock music).[4] The album’s second single, “Body Language”, peaked at #11 on the US charts.

In July 2004, Q magazine listed Hot Space as one of the top fifteen albums where great rock acts lost the plot.[5] Most of the album was recorded in Munich during the most turbulent period in the band’s history, and Roger Taylor and Brian May lamented the new sound, with both being very critical of the influence Freddie Mercury’s manager Paul Prenter had on the singer.[6] Estimated sales of the album currently stand at 3.5 million copies.

The Prophet’s Song

The Prophet’s Song is a song by British rock band Queen, originally released on their fourth studio album A Night at the Opera in 1975.

AllMusic has called the song “mystical prog rock”.[1] Its review of the song also called it an epic as fascinating as “Bohemian Rhapsody” and one of Queen’s finest studio achievements.[2]

“The Prophet’s Song” was composed by Brian May (working title “People of the Earth”). On the show In the Studio with Redbeard, which spotlighted A Night at the Opera, he explained that he wrote the song after a dream he’d had about a great flood while he was recovering from being ill while recording Sheer Heart Attack, and is the source of some of the lyrics. He spent several days putting it together, and it includes a vocal canon sung by Freddie Mercury. The vocal, and later instrumental canon was produced by early tape delay devices. It is a heavy and dark number with a strong progressive rock influence and challenging lead vocals. At over eight minutes in length, is also Queen’s longest song with vocals, though the untitled instrumental track from Queen’s last studio album, Made in Heaven, is about 14 minutes longer.

Princes of the Universe

“Princes of the Universe” is a song written by Freddie Mercury and performed by Queen. The song was written for the soundtrack of the movie Highlander and released on the A Kind of Magic album in 1986.[2]

“Princes of the Universe”, written for Highlander, is the only song on the album for which Mercury receives sole credit. It is played over the film’s opening credits, and was later used as the opening theme for Highlander: The Series.[3] The song was never released as a single in the United Kingdom, and while it never truly charted, it is considered a cult favourite because of its relation to the film. In the movie, the guitar solo in the beginning is deleted.

The lyrics are from the perspective of the immortals, about the state of being immortal, the superiority it gives them to normal humans, and the test that they always have to face because of this. Some of the lyrics can be interpreted as regarding Queen themselves: “People talk about you, people say you’ve had your day / I’m a man that will go far, find the moon and reach for the stars.” The song “Who Wants to Live Forever,” which also features in the film, is the foil of this song.[4]

Play the Game (song)

“Play the Game” is a song by British rock band Queen, written by Freddie Mercury. It is the first track on the first side of their 1980 album The Game. It also appears on their Greatest Hits album. The song commences with a series of overlapping rushing noises on an Oberheim OB-X synthesiser, heralding the band’s acceptance of electronic instruments into their once explicitly “no synths” sonic repertoire. They played it in their live shows from 1980-82. The single was a hit in Queen’s home country reaching #14 in the charts. In America, it peaked at #42.

The song features a soft vocal by Mercury, ending with a strong G4 rising in pitch all the way to C5 in chest voice (contrary to the other C5s being hit in falsetto). Mercury also played piano on the track.

Later singles “It’s a Hard Life” and “You Don’t Fool Me” revisit the theme presented in “Play the Game”, with Mercury writing from the same lover’s perspective years later in the former song, and reflecting on the memories of the failed relationship in the latter. Both “Play the Game” and “It’s a Hard Life” are of a similar structure, revolving around Mercury’s piano playing and the band’s multi-layered harmonies.[1]

 

Pain Is So Close to Pleasure

“Pain Is So Close to Pleasure” is a song by Queen, released only in Canada, Germany, the Netherlands and the USA as the second single from their 1986 album A Kind of Magic.

The song began as a riff idea by Brian May. Then Freddie Mercury and John Deacon turned that into a song, with Deacon playing rhythm guitar. The single reached #43 on the Dutch charts. The title also appears as a line in “One Year of Love”. As with most Mercury songs, it has prominent keyboards and, like most Deacon songs, it has a prominent bass line. It is also one of the only songs in which Mercury sings all the vocals in falsetto.

The version which appears on the single is a remix, rearranging much of the backing track from the original elements. The 12″ single features an extended version of this remix, rather than an extended version of the track as it appears on the album.”Pain Is So Close to Pleasure” has more than 58,000 hits on Lastfm.[1]

One Year of Love (song)

One Year of Love is a song by the British rock band Queen which was originally released on their twelfth studio album A Kind of Magic in 1986.

The song was written by John Deacon and sung by Freddie Mercury for the film Highlander. The album version features John Deacon playing Yamaha DX-7 synth and a string orchestra conducted by Lynton Naiff. The saxophone is played by Steve Gregory, a session musician who had previously performed on George Michael’s 1984 number one “Careless Whisper”.

The song was written in the key of D.[2] Deacon decided to substitute the guitar components with a saxophone solo after a discussion with Brian May, who does not appear on the song.

One Vision

“One Vision” is a song written and recorded by the British rock band Queen, first released as a single in November 1985 and then included on their 1986 album A Kind of Magic. It was originally conceived by Roger Taylor.[1][2]

The song has been speculated to be inspired by either the band’s “show-stopping” performance at Live Aid earlier in 1985, or by the life and exploits of Martin Luther King, with the lyrics recounting a man battling and overcoming the odds.[2] In the 2011 BBC documentary, Queen: Days of Our Lives, Taylor stated his lyrics were “sort of half nicked off Martin Luther King’s famous speech.”[3] The song’s music video featured a “morphing” effect of the band’s famous pose in 1975’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” video to a 1985 version of the same pose. The song was included in all Queen’s live concert performances of The Magic Tour, as the very first song of each concert.[4] They claimed they chose “One Vision” as the introduction song because its intro made a perfect concert introduction.

Now I’m Here

“Now I’m Here” is a song by the British rock band Queen. The sixth song on their third album, Sheer Heart Attack, it was written by lead guitarist Brian May. The song is noted for its hard riff and vocal harmonies. In the UK, the song reached #11 on the charts when released as a single in 1975.[2] The song was a live favourite, performed at virtually every concert from late 1974 to 1986.[3]

The song draws on May’s fond experiences of the band’s US tour, supporting Mott the Hoople, which had taken place earlier in 1974. The aforementioned band are referenced explicitly; Down in the city, just Hoople and me.

It also appeared on the 1981 compilation album Greatest Hits, and the 1997 compilation album Queen Rocks.[4] In March 2005, Q magazine placed “Now I’m Here” at number 33 in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks.[5]

No-One but You (Only the Good Die Young)

“No-One But You (Only the Good Die Young)” is a song recorded by the remaining three members of the British rock band Queen in 1997 following the death of the lead singer Freddie Mercury in 1991. Guitarist Brian May – the writer of the song – and drummer Roger Taylor share lead vocals. The song was released on the album Queen Rocks and it was also released as a double a-side single with “Tie Your Mother Down”.

The impetus for the song came after the death of Diana, Princess of Wales in August 1997, but is largely a eulogy to Freddie Mercury. It was dedicated to Mercury and all those that die too soon.[1] It was originally written for a potential Brian May solo project, which eventually evolved into the album Another World. He sent the demo of the song to Roger Taylor, who according to Taylor himself, put it in a drawer and forgot about it.[2] After eventually hearing it, Taylor suggested that it could be turned into a Queen song. Roger Taylor’s contribution was to change the tempo and make the lyrics less specific to Mercury.

The song features only the remaining three members of Queen, the final new recording to be released under the Queen name alone. This is also the last new recording to feature John Deacon, who subsequently retired from public life. This is the last original Queen release until the 2014 release Queen Forever.

Queen II

Queen II is the second studio album by the British rock band Queen, released on 8 March 1974. It was recorded at Trident Studios, London in August 1973 with co-producers Roy Thomas Baker and Robin Cable, and engineered by Mike Stone. The album is notable for its combination of a heavy rock sound with an art rock sensibility.[4] It has been called “a pillar of grandiose, assaultive hard rock” by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[3]

Queen II is not a concept album but a collection of songs with a loose theme running throughout.[5] The two sides of the original LP were labelled “Side White” and “Side Black” (instead of the conventional sides “1” and “2”), with corresponding photos of the band dressed in white or in black on either side of the record’s label face. The white side has songs with a more emotional theme and the black side is almost entirely about fantasy, often with quite dark themes. Mick Rock’s album cover photograph was frequently re-used by the band throughout its career, most notably in the music videos for the songs “Bohemian Rhapsody” (1975), and “One Vision” (1985).

Released to an initially mixed critical reception, Queen II remains one of the band’s lesser-known albums. Nonetheless, the album has retained a cult following since its release, has garnered praise from musicians such as Axl Rose, Steve Vai and Billy Corgan, and is significant in being the first album to contain elements of the band’s signature sound of multi layered overdubs, vocal harmonies, and varied musical styles.[4][6]

Need Your Loving Tonight

“Need Your Loving Tonight” is a song by the rock band Queen and written by bass guitarist John Deacon. It is the fourth track on the first side of their 1980 album The Game and the second song on the album by Deacon (the other being Another One Bites the Dust).

It was released as a single in November 1980 and peaked at #44 in the United States.

Mustapha (Queen song)

“Mustapha” is a song written by Freddie Mercury and recorded by British rock band Queen. It is the first track of their 1978 album Jazz,[1] categorized as “an up-tempo Hebrew rocker” by Circus Magazine.[2]

“Mustapha” was released as a single in Germany, Spain, Yugoslavia and Bolivia in 1979. The B side of the single was “Dead On Time” for German and Spanish releases and “In Only Seven Days” for Yugoslavian and Bolivian releases. Also, all four versions had different covers.[3]

Some claim that the lyrics are in English, Arabic and Persian.[citation needed]

In live performances, Mercury would often sing the opening vocals of “Mustapha” in place of the complex introduction to “Bohemian Rhapsody”, going from “Allah we’ll pray for you” to “Mama, just killed a man…”. Sometimes the band performed an almost full version of the song from the “Crazy Tour” in late 1979 to “The Game Tour” in 1980, with Mercury at the piano. They dropped the second verse and went from the first chorus to the third. Also notable is that the song was often requested by the audience, as can be heard on “Live Killers”.

The Miracle (song)

“The Miracle” is the fifth and final single from Queen’s 1989 studio album of the same name. It was composed by the entire band, though Freddie Mercury and John Deacon were the main writers.[1] It was released as a single in late November 1989, some six months after the album. It was the last of the singles from that album to be released, and the first 5th single released from any of Queen’s albums from EMI.

The sleeve artwork for the single uses the album’s artwork inverted with a hologram-like fashion. The B-side of the single is a live version of the song “Stone Cold Crazy”, which can be found along with “My Melancholy Blues” from the album News Of The World.

The idea for the song came from Freddie Mercury and John Deacon, who wrote the basic chord structure for the song. All four contributed to the lyrics and musical ideas, and the song was still credited to the entire band because they had agreed to do so during the album recording, regardless of who had been the actual writer. While both Mercury and May regarded this as one of their favourites, Taylor said in the audio commentary of Greatest Video Hits II that although it was not a favourite of his, he respected it as “an incredibly complex track”.

The song describes several of “God’s creations, great and small”, such as great buildings like the Taj Mahal and the Tower of Babel, all described as “miracles” in the song, yet the one miracle “we’re all waiting for” is “peace on Earth and an end to war.” The song also references such well-known figures as Captain Cook, Cain and Abel, and Jimi Hendrix.

Made in Heaven (song)

“Made in Heaven” is the third single recorded by Freddie Mercury, and his fourth release as a solo artist.

Originally featured in Mercury’s debut album, the song was slightly edited and published as a 45rpm paired with “She Blows Hot and Cold”, described on the record sleeve as ‘A Brand New Track’. The single reached #57 on the UK Singles Chart.

After Mercury’s death, the song’s title gave the name to Queen’s 1995 posthumous album Made in Heaven. The song was also chosen, along with “I Was Born to Love You”, to be re-recorded for the album, with the previous vocals over a newly recorded instrumental track.

Love of My Life (Queen song)

“Love of My Life” is a ballad by the British rock band Queen from their 1975 album A Night at the Opera.[1] The song was written by Freddie Mercury about Mary Austin, with whom he had a long term relationship in the early 1970s.[2] After performing the song in South America in 1981, the version from their live album Live Killers reached number 1 in the singles chart in Argentina and Brazil, and stayed in the charts in Argentina for an entire year.[3]

Freddie Mercury wrote it on the piano and guitar first, and Brian May rearranged the song for acoustic 12-string guitar for live performances, also lowering the key by a minor third. May contributed occasional guitar phrases to the original recording and played the swooping harp glissandos by pasting together multiple takes of single chords. The song is an example of Mercury’s familiarity with rubato phrasing, showcasing his classical piano influences, notably by Chopin and Beethoven.

With its similar lyrical theme, the Roger Taylor penned single “These Are the Days of Our Lives” would later hearken back to “Love of My Life”, twice using the line “I still love you”. At the end of “These Are the Days of Our Lives”, Mercury simply speaks those words, as he would often do in live versions of “Love of My Life”.[4]

During the voyage of the space shuttle Columbia (STS-107), Israeli astronaut, Ilan Ramon, asked to play the song. The song was played in the shuttle and Ramon said: “A special good morning to my wife, Rona, the love of my life.”[5] Ramon died in the Columbia disaster shortly thereafter, during its return to the atmosphere in 2003.

Long Away

“Long Away” is a single by the band Queen; it is the third track on the first side of the 1976 album A Day at the Races. Brian May wrote the song and sings the lead vocals.

This song is available as a downloadable content for Rock Band 3. Also, it appeared on the 2014 compilation album Queen Forever.

It is one of the few songs where May uses a guitar other than his Red Special. For the rhythm guitar parts he used an electric Burns twelve string guitar (although he used the Red Special for the second guitar solo in the middle section of the track). Originally May wanted to use a Rickenbacker guitar (as he admired John Lennon), but he didn’t get along well with the Rickenbacker’s thin neck.

Roger Taylor sings the highest parts of the song.

Lily of the Valley (song)

“Lily of the Valley” is a song by British rock band Queen. Lead singer Freddie Mercury plays the piano and provides all the vocals on the track. It was originally featured on Queen’s third album, Sheer Heart Attack, released in 1974, and is one of the album’s few slow ballads.

In 1975, “Lily of the Valley” was released as the B-side of different singles in the U.K. and the United States. The U.K. single was “Now I’m Here”, and the U.S. single was a reissue of “Keep Yourself Alive”.[1]

The lyrics refer back to a song from a previous album, “Seven Seas of Rhye” from Queen II, with the line “messenger from Seven Seas has flown, to tell the King of Rhye he’s lost his throne.”

In a 1999 interview, Brian May told the British music magazine MOJO, “Freddie’s stuff was so heavily cloaked, lyrically… But you could find out, just from little insights, that a lot of his private thoughts were in there, although a lot of the more meaningful stuff was not very accessible. Lily of the Valley [Sheer Heart Attack] was utterly heartfelt. It’s about looking at his girlfriend and realising that his body needed to be somewhere else. It’s a great piece of art, but it’s the last song that would ever be a hit.”[2]

Liar (Queen song)

“Liar” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by the lead singer Freddie Mercury in 1970, and originally titled “Lover”. The song featured on the band’s 1973 debut album Queen. A heavily truncated version of “Liar” was released as a single – backed with “Doing All Right” – in the United States by Elektra Records in February 1974.

In the band’s early years, “Liar” was a concert staple, performed as a conclusion to their main set and often lasting for up to ten minutes. However, over time the song eventually fell off the setlist, with the exception of The Works Tour (though the song was cut down to three minutes or less). “Liar” was referenced in the setlist of the Magic Tour, as Brian May played a partial guitar riff from the song immediately before “Tear it Up”.

During live performances, it was a notable case where John Deacon mimed singing backing vocals – namely, he stood behind Mercury and sang into his microphone, for the “all day long” section of the song. This is replicated in the song’s promotional video, shot in 1973. Seemingly, Deacon only mouthed the words in live performances, as his voice cannot be heard here on any recording, official or bootlegged. The choice to only mime singing along was presumably a result of Deacon’s admitted weaker singing ability. The song also contains a bass solo performed by Deacon, the most substantial solo he ever performed live. As confirmed by the transcription on EMI Music Publishing’s Off The Record sheet music for the song, this is one of three Queen tracks, the others being “Now I’m Here” and “Under Pressure” (their collaboration originally with David Bowie), to feature a Hammond organ.

This song briefly brought up the issue of songwriting credits within the band. Brian May queried which band members would be credited for developing the music for each song, to which Freddie Mercury concluded the discussion, stating that the lyricist, or otherwise the individual who originates the song, should be credited as its writer, a practice that continued until “The Miracle”.

Let Me Live

“Let Me Live” is a song by Queen, from the album Made in Heaven. Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor and Brian May share lead vocals, with Mercury singing the first verse, Taylor singing the second verse & bridge, and May singing the last verse. During the choruses, all of the band members sing (except for John Deacon), as well as a background choir, giving it a gospel sound reminiscent of the band’s 1976 single “Somebody to Love”. The single reached #9 in the UK Single Charts.

Las Palabras de Amor

“Las Palabras de Amor (The Words of Love)” is a rock ballad by the British rock band Queen. It was released as the third single from their 1982 album Hot Space. Written by guitarist Brian May, the song proved more popular in the United Kingdom than their previous single (“Body Language”), reaching #17 in the UK Singles Chart.[1]

The song’s lyrics were written by guitarist Brian May.[2] Vocals were provided by lead singer Freddie Mercury with May on the high harmony vocal. The song was inspired by the band’s close relationship with their Latin American fans. It marked the band’s final studio appearance on Top of the Pops (having previously appeared to promote “Seven Seas of Rhye”, “Killer Queen”, “Now I’m Here” and “Good Old-Fashioned Lover Boy” respectively). For this mimed performance May is seen playing a grand piano as well as his guitar and, on the recording, he plays both piano and synths in addition to acoustic and electric guitars. May also sang lead vocals for the harmonized line “this time and evermore” throughout the song. At one point Mercury is seen miming incorrect words.

A Kind of Magic (song)

“A Kind of Magic” is the title track of the 1986 album of the same name by the British rock band Queen. It was written by the band’s drummer, Roger Taylor, for the film Highlander. The single reached number three in the UK Singles Chart, top ten in a number of European countries, and #42 on the US Billboard Hot 100. The song is the opening track on the band’s compilation albums, Greatest Hits II, and Classic Queen.[1]

Killer Queen

“Killer Queen” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It was their first big international hit, reaching number two in the UK and becoming their first US hit.[3] Written by lead singer and pianist Freddie Mercury, it was featured on their third album Sheer Heart Attack and later appeared on the band’s first compilation album, Greatest Hits.[4]

The song is about a high-class call girl.[3] It has been characterised as “Mercury’s piano-led paean to a Moët-quaffing courtesan”.[5] It has also been described by AllMusic as the true beginning of Queen’s “radio sound” and “recalls the cabaret songs of yesteryear, but also shows how Queen was fast becoming a master of power pop”.[3] Rock historian Paul Fowles has written that “Killer Queen”, with its “sleazy Parisian imagery”, allowed “free rein” to Mercury’s “unique brand of rock theater”.[6] The song won Mercury his first Ivor Novello Award.[7]

Keep Yourself Alive

“Keep Yourself Alive” is a song by British rock band Queen. Written by guitarist Brian May, it is the opening track on the band’s eponymous debut album Queen (1973). It was released as Queen’s first single along with “Son and Daughter” as the B-side. “Keep Yourself Alive” was largely ignored upon its release and failed to chart on either side of the Atlantic.

In 2008, Rolling Stone Magazine rated the song 31st on its list of “The 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time”.[1]

The Works (Queen album)

The Works is the eleventh studio album by the British rock band Queen, released on 27 February 1984. After the synth-heavy Hot Space, the album saw the re-emergence of Brian May and Roger Taylor’s rock sound, while still incorporating the early 80s retro futuristic electro pop of the German electronic underground (Freddie Mercury) and New York funk scenes (John Deacon).

Recorded at the Record Plant Studios in Los Angeles, California and Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany from August 1983 to January 1984, the album’s title comes from a comment Taylor made as recording began – “Let’s give them the works!”. During the decade, after a conservative reaction on and ban of the music video for I Want to Break Free in the USA, the band decided not to tour in North America and lost the top spot in US sales, but sales around the world (especially Europe) would be even better. The Works sold over 5 million copies worldwide.

Jealousy (Queen song)

Jealousy is a song by British Rock band Queen which has been originally released on their seventh studio album Jazz in 1978, and one year later has been released as the fourth and last single from the album. It was written by Freddie Mercury.[1]

The song has been released as a single only in six countries US, Canada, Brazil, New Zealand, and USSR, but failed to chart anywhere. The single was the first and last single of the band in the USSR. In the USSR B-side of the single was “Don’t Stop Me Now” but in other countries the B-side was “Fun It”. In 1980 the song had been included to the list of songs for the 1980 Summer Olympics which were celebrated in Moscow.[2]

“Jealousy” was penned by Mercury and features May playing his Hairfred acoustic guitar placing small pieces of piano wire under the frets to produce the “buzzing” effect of a sitar. This effect had already been used on “White Queen (As It Began)”, from Queen II. All vocals were recorded by Mercury.

It’s Late

“It’s Late” is a song written by Queen guitarist Brian May and performed by the band for their 1977 album News of the World. The song was May’s idea of treating a song as a three-act theatrical play, and the verses are called “acts” in the lyrics sheet. It makes use of the tapping technique a few months before Eddie Van Halen’s use of the tapping technique on the Van Halen album. May told Guitar Player Magazine[1] that his use of the tapping technique was inspired by an unnamed bar-band guitarist from Texas. Tapping had also been previously used by other players, notably Steve Hackett of Genesis. The song is notable for its length and heavy, wide vocal range (E3-E6), bluesy guitar riff, and using the previously mentioned technique.

The lyrics describe a love affair that is on the verge of ending.[2]

The song was released as a single in the US in 1978, albeit in heavily edited form, and peaked at #74 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100[3] and #66 on the Cash Box Top 100.[4] The song was later included on the Queen Rocks compilation in 1997, and a new video was produced using footage of Las Vegas and prostitutes, intercut with live performances of the song.

The song appears in the 2006 documentary film Kurt Cobain: About a Son. The song also plays over the credits in the Jody Hill film Observe and Report.

On the live album Return of the Champions by Queen + Paul Rodgers a stripped back version of the song “Hammer to Fall” is played in a fashion that takes inspiration from “It’s Late”.

It’s a Hard Life

“It’s a Hard Life” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by lead singer Freddie Mercury. It was featured on their 1984 album The Works, and it was the third single from that album. It reached number 6 in the UK Singles Chart and was their third consecutive Top 10 single from the album. It also reached number 2 in Ireland and number 20 in the Netherlands. It also came 19th on a poll, The Nation’s Favourite Queen Song broadcast on ITV on Tuesday 11 November 2014.

Is This the World We Created…?

“Is This the World We Created…?” is a song by the British rock band Queen, which was originally released on their eleventh studio album The Works in 1984.

The song was played at every Queen concert from 1984 to 1986. It was part of the finale at Live Aid in 1985. The song is the shortest one on the album but still is one of the most famous songs on it.[1][2] It has more than 20,000 hits on Last.fm.[3]

The Invisible Man (Queen song)

“The Invisible Man” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by drummer Roger Taylor. The song is sung mostly by Freddie Mercury, with vocal contributions from Taylor. Originally released on the album The Miracle, it was released as a single in 1989. Taylor claims that he got the inspiration to create the song while reading a book (possibly the book of the same name), and the bassline instantly came to his imagination. This song marks the only time in any of Queen’s songs that all four band members names are mentioned in the lyrics. The first being Freddie Mercury, followed by John Deacon. Brian May’s name is then said twice (just before his guitar solo starts), and while saying “Roger Taylor”, the “r” is rolled to emulate the drums at the end of the verse. Freddie Mercury’s name is said by drummer Roger Taylor, and the other ones by the lead singer Freddie Mercury.

Innuendo (song)

“Innuendo” is a 1991 single by the British rock band Queen. It is the opening track on the album of the same name, and was released as the first single from the album. The single went straight to Number 1 in the UK Singles Chart in January 1991.[2]

At six and a half minutes, it is one of Queen’s epic songs and their longest ever released as a single, exceeding “Bohemian Rhapsody” by 35 seconds. The song has been described as “reminiscent” of “Bohemian Rhapsody” because it was “harking back to their progressive rock roots”.[1] It features a flamenco guitar section performed by Yes guitarist Steve Howe and Brian May,[3][4] an operatic interlude and sections of hard rock that recall early Queen, in addition to lyrics inspired in part by lead singer Freddie Mercury’s illness; although media stories about his health were being strenuously denied, he was by now seriously ill with AIDS, which would claim his life in November 1991, 10 months after the single was released.

Accompanied by a music video featuring animated representations of the band on a cinema screen akin to Nineteen Eighty-Four, eerie plasticine figure stop-motion and harrowing imagery, it has been described as one of the band’s darkest and most moving works.[5] AllMusic described the song as a “superb epic”, which deals with “mankind’s inability to live harmoniously”.[6]

Sheer Heart Attack

Sheer Heart Attack is the third studio album by the British rock band Queen, released on 8 November 1974. It was produced by the band and Roy Thomas Baker and distributed by EMI in the United Kingdom, and Elektra in the United States.

The album launched Queen to mainstream popularity both in the UK and internationally: the first single, “Killer Queen”, reached No. 2 in the British charts and provided them with their first top 20 hit in the US, peaking at No. 12 on the Billboard singles chart. Sheer Heart Attack was also the first Queen album to hit the US top 20, peaking at No. 12 in 1975. Digressing from the progressive themes featured on their first two albums, this album featured more conventional rock tracks and marked a step towards the classic Queen sound.[5] The album has been acknowledged for containing “a wealth of outstanding hard rock guitar tracks”.[2] Retrospectively, it has been listed by multiple publications as one of the band’s best works and has been deemed an essential glam rock album.[4]

I’m in Love with My Car

“I’m in Love with My Car” is a song by the British rock band Queen, originally released on their fourth album A Night at the Opera in 1975. It is the album’s only song written entirely by drummer Roger Taylor.

The song lyrics were initially taken as a joke by Brian May, who thought that Taylor was not serious when he heard a demo recording.

Taylor played the guitars in the original demo, but they were later re-recorded by May on his Red Special. The lead vocals were performed by Taylor on the studio version and all released live versions.[1] The revving sounds at the conclusion of the song were recorded by Taylor’s then current car, an Alfa Romeo. The lyrics were inspired by one of the band’s roadies, Johnathan Harris, whose Triumph TR4 was evidently the “love of his life”.[2] The song is dedicated to him; the album says: “Dedicated to Johnathan Harris, boy racer to the end”.

When it came down to releasing the album’s first single, Taylor was so fond of his song that he urged Freddie Mercury (author of the first single, “Bohemian Rhapsody”) to allow it to be the B-side and reportedly locked himself in a cupboard until Mercury agreed. This decision would later become the cause of much internal friction in the band, in that while it was only the B-side, it generated an equal amount of publishing royalties for Taylor as the main single did for Mercury simply because it was the B-side to “Bohemian Rhapsody”.[2]

The song was often played live during the 1977–81 period. Taylor sang it from the drums while Mercury played piano and provided backing vocals. During the News Of The World Tour, Mercury would often sing the chorus lines with Taylor. It was played in the Queen + Paul Rodgers tour in 2005 and the Rock the Cosmos Tour in 2008. Taylor would again play the song for his concerts with The Cross and solo tours, where instead of drums he played rhythm guitar like in the demo recording.

The song was used in a 2004 advertisement for Jaguar.[3] Music writer Tom Reynolds described the song as “[s]eriously, one of the greatest and most passionate love songs I’ve heard during the last thirty-plus years”.[4]

 

I’m Going Slightly Mad

“I’m Going Slightly Mad” is a song by the British rock band Queen. Written by Freddie Mercury, it was released as the second single from the band’s 1991 album Innuendo. The lyrics and the accompanying music video project the song as quirky, humorous and light-hearted.[1] The song also features a slide guitar solo performed by Brian May. John Deacon’s bass is tuned down to a low B.

The single cover was inspired by a Grandville illustration (as are the others from the album).

I Was Born to Love You (song)

“I Was Born to Love You” is a 1985 song by Freddie Mercury, and was released as a single and on the Mr. Bad Guy album. After Mercury’s death, Queen re-worked this song for their album Made in Heaven in 1995, by having the other members play their instrumental parts over the original track transforming the song from a disco number to a hard rocker.

The song received its live debut on the 2005 Queen + Paul Rodgers tour of Japan. Brian May and Roger Taylor performed the song acoustically. The song was also performed during Queen + Adam Lambert’s concerts in South Korea and Japan, which was the first time that a full live band was used for the performance.

The Queen version from the Made In Heaven album also includes samples of Mercury’s ad-lib vocals taken from “A Kind of Magic” from the 1986 album of the same name and from “Living On My Own” from his Mr. Bad Guy album.

I Want to Break Free

“I Want to Break Free” (About this sound sample (help·info)) is a song by the British rock band Queen, originally from their eleventh album The Works (1984). Written by bass guitarist John Deacon, it was distributed as a single on 7-inch and 12-inch vinyl records and 3-inch and 5-inch CDs. The song had three versions: album, single and extended, differing in length by more than a factor of 2. It came to be included in most live concerts by the group, in several videos, and in The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert where it was sung by Lisa Stansfield.

The song is largely known for its music video for which all the band members dressed in women’s clothes, a concept proposed by Roger Taylor, which parodied the long-running ITV soap opera Coronation Street. The second part of the video included a composition rehearsed and performed with the Royal Ballet and choreographed by Wayne Eagling. Whereas the parody was acclaimed in the United Kingdom, it was considered controversial in the United States and banned by MTV[2] and other stations. After its release in 1984 the single of the song was well received all over Europe and South America, where it was listed within top ten and regarded as an anthem of fight against oppression. The single reached only the 45th position in the US charts, but reached number 3 in the UK and was certified silver with 200,000+ copies sold.[3]

I Want It All (Queen song)

“I Want It All” is a song by British rock band Queen, featured on their 1989 studio album The Miracle. Written by guitarist and backing vocalist Brian May (but credited to Queen) and produced by David Richards, it was released as the first single from the album on 2 May 1989.[1] “I Want It All” reached #3 on both the UK Singles Chart[2] and the American Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart,[3] #50 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart[3] and #1 in other European territories, including Spain, where Los 40 Principales regularly played the song during the month of July 1989.[1]

The song was first played live on 20 April 1992, three years after its release, during The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, performed by the three remaining members of Queen, with Roger Daltrey singing lead vocals and Tony Iommi playing rhythm guitar.[4] Mercury himself never performed the song live, as he died in November 1991 from AIDS at the age of 45, and his final performance with Queen was at the end of The Magic Tour, in 1986. The song is sung mainly by Mercury, with May singing on the choruses and middle eight.

There are at least two versions of this song. The longer one is the album version, while the shortest one is used in the music video and in the Greatest Hits II compilation. Compared to the album version, the video version features a different beginning, omitting the acoustic/electric guitar part and the short rhythmic-electric guitar part immediately following. It starts with the band singing the chorus a cappella, and then, after a 1/8 + 2/4 A5 power chord, it picks up on the first electric guitar riff by May that follows the short rhythmic guitar part mentioned before. The guitar solo section is different as well: the album version features an extra solo, done at the same tempo as the rest of the song, just before the faster main solo. Mercury’s vocals after the middle eight are also slightly different and are positioned on the “extra” solo on the album version, and on the main solo on the video version.

I Can’t Live with You

“I Can’t Live with You” is a song by the British rock group Queen. It was released as a promo single from their 1991 album Innuendo. The single was released by Hollywood Records in the United States only, peaking at #28 on the Mainstream Rock Chart.

The song was written by Brian May but credited to all four members of Queen. “I Can’t Live with You” was originally written for May’s solo album. He gave it to the band since all three other members of Queen were fond of the track. Drums were programmed on synth by May, and the keyboard-pads were added by the producer David Richards.

For this promotional single, American producer Brian Malouf remixed the original album track. The remix was titled “I Can’t Live with You (Malouf Mix)”. Despite the promo sleeve only displaying one track, there are two on the single, the other being “I Can’t Live with You (Malouf Mix Edit)”.[1][2]

The Malouf Mix uses slightly different lead vocal tracks by Freddie Mercury, louder and tighter harmony tracks, and reprogrammed synth drums, resulting in a much more punchy and “over the top” poppy version than included on the album.

An alternative version of this song appeared on the 1997 compilation album Queen Rocks, billed as the “’97 Rocks Retake”. it was said to be more along the lines of how May and Taylor originally wanted the track to sound, with a harder, guitar-driven rock edge. The original versions vocal was used in this retake.

It was among the last songs recorded by Freddie Mercury, who died within a year of the album’s release.

Heaven for Everyone

“Heaven for Everyone” is a song written by Roger Taylor. It appeared originally in his band’s, The Cross, album Shove It, with Freddie Mercury as a guest vocalist, and it is the album’s fourth track. It was reworked with Queen’s music and appeared in the 1995 album Made in Heaven, where it was the seventh track and released as the first single. The song reached number two on the UK Singles Chart.[1] The music video contains footage of Georges Méliès seminal 1902 silent film A Trip to the Moon.[2]

Headlong (song)

“Headlong” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It was released as the third single from Queen’s 1991 album Innuendo.

The song was written by Queen guitarist Brian May, who intended to record it for his then-upcoming solo album Back to the Light (1992), but when he heard Queen lead singer Freddie Mercury sing the track, he allowed it to become a Queen song.

The song was the first single to be released in the United States under their contract with Hollywood Records on 14 January 1991, though it was not released in the United Kingdom for another four months (the first single in the United Kingdom was “Innuendo”, which Hollywood eventually released in the US as a promotional single for radio stations). The song charted on the Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart in the United States at #3. The line “And you’re rushin’ headlong” from the chorus is somewhat lifted from the second verse of “Breakthru”, a single from Queen’s previous album The Miracle, which contains the lyrics “I wanna rush headlong into this ecstasy”.

The cover of one of the CD singles is inspired by Grandville illustrations, as are all of the other singles from the album.

Hammer to Fall

“Hammer to Fall” is a 1984 song by the British rock band Queen. Written by guitarist Brian May, the song is the eighth track on their 1984 album The Works.[1]

It was the fourth and final single to be released from that album, although the single version was edited down by thirty seconds in contrast to the version on the album. Different sleeves were used to package this single and the live picture sleeve is now a collector’s item. The song harks back to the Queen of old, with a song being built around a hard angular and muscular riff. The song features Freddie Mercury on lead vocals.

“Hammer to Fall” was a concert favourite, and was the third song the band performed at Live Aid in 1985.[2][3][4] The song features in the setlist of both The Works Tour and The Magic Tour.[5][6] The full album version of the song appears on Queen Rocks while the single version appears on Greatest Hits II and Classic Queen.[1]

Good Old-Fashioned Lover Boy

“Good Old-Fashioned Lover Boy” is the third single and the eighth track from the British rock band Queen’s 1976 album A Day at the Races, written by Freddie Mercury. It was one of several British music hall-inspired songs composed by members of the band.

The song begins with a piano and vocal introduction by Mercury, then continues, with the bass and drums adding on, at the start of the chorus. The second verse is sung, followed by another chorus. At this point, the drums, bass and guitar drop out, which then leads into the bridge, sung by Freddie Mercury and Mike Stone. Following the Brian May guitar solo, another verse is sung, and then the chorus ends the track.

The song describes how “a good old-fashioned lover boy” will romance with an unnamed love interest, especially at night.

Good Company (Queen song)

Good Company is a song by British rock band Queen, which was written by Brian May. May also played a “Genuine Aloha” Banjo uke and provided all the vocals on the track.

One of the main features of the song is that it contains a recreation of a jazz band in Dixieland style which was provided by the May’s Red Special guitar played through the Deacy Amp. This is one of the few Queen songs without Freddie Mercury participating at all.
The song tells a story about a man who was advised in young age by his father to “take care of those you call your own, and keep good company”. The young man accepts the advice, marrying a girl named Sally and also keeping his friends. However, he began losing interest in his friends after the marriage and they gradually disappear. As he is older, he is becoming more skilled and dedicated to his occupation by working long nights and neglecting his family.
In the end, all his efforts is rewarded and he begins his own Limited company (it also serves as a pun; the word “company” mainly serves as a meaning of friends, companions). Dedicated more to his business, he hardly noticed that his wife left him.

News of the World (album)

News of the World is the sixth studio album by the British rock band Queen, released on 28 October 1977. Containing the hit songs “We Will Rock You”, “We Are the Champions” and “Spread Your Wings”, it went 4x platinum in the United States, and achieved high certifications around the world, selling over 6 million copies. News of the World is Queen’s highest selling studio album to date.

News of the World was the band’s second album to be recorded at Sarm West and Wessex Studios, London, and engineered by Mike Stone, and was co-produced by the band and Stone.

Friends Will Be Friends

“Friends Will Be Friends” is a song performed by Queen and written by Freddie Mercury and John Deacon, included on the album A Kind of Magic. It was the band’s 30th single in the UK upon its release on 9 June 1986, reaching number 14 in the UK.

“Friends Will Be Friends” was performed live on The Magic Tour. It is remarkable that it was the first and only song that was sung at the end of concerts between “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions” since the News of the World Tour in 1977.[1]

The song was included in various greatest hits compilations by Queen such as Greatest Hits II, Greatest Flix II and Greatest Video Hits II.

Flick of the Wrist

“Flick of the Wrist” is a song by the British rock band Queen, released as a Double A-side with “Killer Queen” in the United Kingdom, Canada, the Netherlands, the United States and most other territories. It was written by Freddie Mercury for the 1974 album Sheer Heart Attack.

Freddie Mercury never explained whether the unpleasant character in the song was based on anyone in particular. It has been speculated that the lyrics describe manager Norman Sheffield, based on the fact that the song “Death on Two Legs (Dedicated to…)”, written the next year in 1975, was confirmed to be about Sheffield and what Mercury perceived as his unfair treatment of the group. While “Death on Two Legs (Dedicated to…)” was written after the band’s contract with Sheffield and Trident Studios had ended, “Flick of the Wrist” was written and recorded amid this strained relationship. The song includes Freddie Mercury singing octave vocals throughout the verses, and the chorus features a call and response style section between the backing and lead vocal parts. When Brian May returned to work having recovered from his hepatitis, he had not heard the song before he recorded his guitar and backing vocals.

Flash (Queen song)

“Flash” is a song by the British rock band Queen. Written by guitarist Brian May, “Flash” is the theme song of the 1980 film Flash Gordon. The soundtrack released to coincide with the film contained only the music composed and performed by Queen.

There are two versions of the song. The album version (“Flash’s Theme”) is in fact the start to the movie, with all the dialogue from the first scene. The single version features dialogue cut from various parts of the movie, most memorably, Brian Blessed’s character exclaiming “Gordon’s alive?!” This version was also included on the Greatest Hits compilation from 1981.[1]

Flash is sung as a duet between Freddie Mercury and Brian May, with Roger Taylor adding the high harmonies. May plays all of the instruments except for the rhythm section. He used an Imperial Bösendorfer Grand Piano (with 97 keys instead of 88, having an extra octave on the low range), Oberheim OBX synth (which he plays in the video) and his homemade Red Special electric guitar.

On the U.S. charts, “Flash’s Theme aka Flash” reached #42 on the Billboard Hot 100. It peaked at #39 on the Cash Box Top 100. It fared much better in Europe, where it was a Top 10 hit in most nations, including #1 in Austria. In Australia and New Zealand, the song reached #6.

Fat Bottomed Girls

“Fat Bottomed Girls” is a song by the British rock band Queen. Written by guitarist Brian May, the track featured on their 1978 album Jazz, and later on their compilation album, Greatest Hits.[2] When released as a single with “Bicycle Race”, the song reached number 11 in the UK Singles Chart, and number 24 in the Billboard Hot 100 in the US.[3][4]

The song is formed around an open bluesy, metallic guitar tuning, with the tune opening with its chorus.[5] It was one of the few Queen songs played in an alternative guitar tuning, being played in drop D tuning.[6] The song’s music video was filmed at the Dallas Convention Center in Texas in October 1978.[7]

Don’t Stop Me Now

“Don’t Stop Me Now” is a song by the British rock band Queen, featured on their 1978 album Jazz that was released as a single in 1979. Written by lead singer Freddie Mercury, it was recorded in August 1978 at Super Bear Studios in Berre-les-Alpes (Alpes-Maritimes), France, and is the twelfth track on the album.[1]

Musically the song builds on Mercury’s piano playing, with John Deacon and Roger Taylor providing a bass guitar and drums backing track. The song also provides an example of Queen’s trademark style of multitrack harmony vocals for the chorus lines.[2]

On the studio version, Brian May’s only guitar playing is in his guitar solo, but on live versions performed on the band’s 1979 Jazz and Crazy tours, May would also play rhythm guitar throughout the rest of the song to give more of a feel of rock music. A live version of the song features in the band’s 1979 album Live Killers.[3] The song also appears in the band’s 1981 compilation album Greatest Hits, and in June 2011, as part of Queen’s 40th anniversary celebrations, an old take of the song containing more guitar parts was included on the bonus EP of the re-released and remastered Jazz album.[4][5]

The electronics company Alba conducted a survey of 2000 UK adults, which asked respondents to name their favourite uplifting song, and ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’ was the most commonly said.[6]

Delilah (Queen song)

“Delilah” is a song by British rock band Queen. Written and sung by Freddie Mercury, it was originally released on their fourteenth studio album Innuendo in 1991. The song was released as a single on 14 December only in Thailand.[citation needed]

Delilah is a song Mercury penned for his favourite female tortoiseshell cat, which was called Delilah. It was one of the first completed tracks on the album.[1] Brian May recorded his solo using a talk box. It was written in the key of G Major.[2] Reportedly, Roger Taylor was not fond of the song and agreed to let it be included in the album only at Mercury’s insistence.[citation needed]

Death on Two Legs (Dedicated to…)

“Death on Two Legs (Dedicated to…)” is a song by the British rock band Queen, and is the opening track on their fourth album A Night at the Opera. The song was written by Freddie Mercury and allegedly describes his hatred of Queen’s original manager, the late Norman Sheffield, who is reputed to have mistreated the band and abused his managerial role from 1972 to 1975.

The song was recorded and mixed at Sarm East Studios in late 1975. As with “Bohemian Rhapsody”, most of the guitar parts on the song were initially played on piano by Mercury, to demonstrate to Brian May how they needed to be played on guitar.

Crazy Little Thing Called Love

“Crazy Little Thing Called Love” is a song by the rock band Queen. Written by Freddie Mercury in 1979, the track is featured on their 1980 album The Game, and also appears on the band’s compilation album, Greatest Hits. The song peaked at number two in the UK Singles Chart in 1979, and became the group’s first number-one single on the Billboard Hot 100 in the U.S. in 1980,[4] remaining there for four consecutive weeks; it would be the start of Queen’s popularity in America.[5][6] It topped the Australian ARIA Charts for seven weeks.[7]

Having composed “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” on guitar, Mercury played rhythm guitar while performing the song live, which was the first time he played guitar in concert with Queen.[8] Queen played the song live between 1979 and 1986, and a live performance of the song is recorded in the albums Queen Rock Montreal and Queen at Wembley.[9][10] Since its release, the song has been covered by a number of artists. The song was played live on 20 April 1992 during The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, performed by Robert Plant with Queen.[11] The style of the song was described by author Karl Coryat as rockabilly in his 1999 book titled The Bass Player Book.[12]

Calling All Girls

“Calling All Girls” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It is the third track on the album Hot Space and it was written by Roger Taylor. It was the fourth single from the album. It was released as a single in the summer of 1982 in the US, Canada and Poland, where it peaked at #60, #5 and #6 respectively.

“Calling All Girls” was the first Roger Taylor-penned song to be released as a single, although it was only released in certain countries, including the US, Australia and Canada, but not the UK. Taylor composed the song on guitar, playing feedback noises during the break. There is also the notable use of record-scratching.

The song was never performed in Europe, but a 1982 live recording in Japan is available on the Queen on Fire – Live at the Bowl DVD.

Breakthru (song)

“Breakthru” is a song by the British rock band Queen. Credited as being written by Queen, it was released in June 1989 from the album The Miracle. The single reached #7 in the UK, and peaked at number 6 in the Netherlands and Ireland, but failed to chart in the US. The song is remarkable for its video where the group is performing the song on an open platform of a fast-moving steam train.

The album version of the song begins with 30 seconds of slow vocal harmony. It was apparently written by Freddie Mercury for a different song which ended up never being released, “A New Life Is Born”.[1][2] It then abruptly changes to a fast-paced rocker, that was written by Roger Taylor. Other song versions were created by either extending or cutting the introduction.[3] On the Queen for an Hour interview conducted in 1989, Mercury said that this was a great example of two separate bits coming together to make a final track. He commented on how the band had about 30 tracks to work with and only completed a handful, working on all of them at least somewhat.[4]

Bohemian Rhapsody

“Bohemian Rhapsody” is a song by the British rock band Queen. It was written by Freddie Mercury for the band’s 1975 studio album A Night at the Opera. It is a six-minute suite,[1] consisting of several sections without a chorus: an intro, a ballad segment, an operatic passage, a hard rock part and a reflective coda.[2] The song is a more accessible take on the 1970s progressive rock genre.[3] It was reportedly the most expensive single ever made at the time of its release, though the exact cost of production cannot be determined.[4]

When it was released as a single, “Bohemian Rhapsody” became a commercial success, staying at the top of the UK Singles Chart for nine weeks and selling more than a million copies by the end of January 1976.[5] It reached number one again in 1991 for another five weeks when the same version was re-released,[6] eventually becoming the UK’s third-best-selling single of all time.[7] It topped the charts in several other markets as well, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and The Netherlands, later becoming one of the best-selling singles of all time. In the United States the song originally peaked at number nine in 1976. It returned to the chart at number two in 1992 following its appearance in the film Wayne’s World, which revived its American popularity.

Although critical reaction was initially mixed, “Bohemian Rhapsody” remains one of Queen’s most popular songs and is frequently placed on modern lists of the greatest songs of all time. The single was accompanied by a promotional video, which many scholars consider ground-breaking.[8] Rolling Stone magazine states: “Its influence cannot be overstated, practically inventing the music video seven years before MTV went on the air.”[9] In 2004, “Bohemian Rhapsody” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[10] In 2012, the song topped the list on an ITV nationwide poll in the UK to find “The Nation’s Favourite Number One” over 60 years of music.[11]

Body Language (Queen song)

“Body Language” (printed as “Body Language ↑⬱”) is a 1982 dance/funk song by British rock band Queen. It was written by the band’s lead singer Freddie Mercury and was a hit in North America, where it received extensive radio play. However, the single only received a lukewarm response in the United Kingdom. The track was the second single released from their 1982 album Hot Space.

The massive success of “Another One Bites the Dust” inspired Queen to temporarily abandon their glam and experimental rock roots in the early 1980s, and experiment with disco, funk and soul music. “Body Language” and its parent album Hot Space were the results of this change. “Body Language” is notable for its near lack of guitar; atmospheric guitar chords sparingly dot the body of the song, while a brief two-note riff is heard during the fade out. The song’s key feature was its minimal, sparse production, with the emphasis of “suggestive” lyrics, a “slinky” synth bass (played on an Oberheim OB-X), and writer Freddie Mercury’s moans and groans. This song was played twice during the European Leg, with the first performance being in Vienna on 13 May. It often got a lukewarm reaction, although the live arrangement was much different from the studio. The song was played much more frequently on the U.S leg, where the song achieved more commercial success.

The full title of the song, as printed both on the single and Hot Space album sleeve, is “Body Language ↑⬱”. The usage and pronunciation of the arrows was never explained by any member of Queen, though the arrows did show up as part of the single’s cover art and in its video, where they were painted on the bodies of models, while Freddie Mercury also wore shirts and a white leather jacket during the album’s ensuing tour that had similar arrow designs.

Bicycle Race

“Bicycle Race” is a single by the British rock band Queen. It was released on their 1978 album Jazz and written by Queen’s frontman Freddie Mercury. It was released as a double A-side single together with the song “Fat Bottomed Girls”. The song is notable for its video featuring a bicycle race with nude women at Wimbledon Stadium, which was edited or even banned in several countries.

The song was written by Mercury and was inspired by watching the 18th stage of the 1978 Tour de France passing Montreux where the band were recording Jazz in the Mountain Studios.[1][2] It starts with a chorus unaccompanied by instruments. The chorus is followed by two verses connected with a bridge, both followed by a chorus. Around the middle of the song there is a solo played with numerous bicycle bells. The song has an unusual chord progression with numerous modulations, a change of meter (from 4/4 to 6/8) in the bridge, and multitracked vocal and guitar harmonies.[3]
The lyrics are topical for the time and contain social, political and pop-culture references, such as religion, Vietnam War, Watergate, drugs, fictional characters (Peter Pan, Frankenstein and Superman), and the films Jaws and Star Wars. The song also mentions actor John Wayne. The lyrics also mention the exclamatory interjection, “Hot dog!” and the idiom “Cool it, man!”
Brian May claims that the song was not an autobiographical portrait of Mercury and that Mercury did not particularly enjoy bicycling, also noting that despite the lyrics Mercury was a Star Wars fan.[4]
The song references the band’s song “Fat Bottomed Girls” with the lyric “fat bottomed girls, they’ll be riding today”. The two songs were released as a double A-sided single.

Back Chat

“Back Chat”, written by the bass guitarist John Deacon, is the track most influenced by funk on the 1982 Queen album Hot Space. Deacon had chosen a no-compromise method of eliminating any rock elements from his songs for Hot Space. This act of defiance caused friction amongst fellow band members, particularly Brian May, who fought to retain at least some rock sensibilities in their funk diversions.[1] After heated debate, the band finally decided to include a guitar solo on “Back Chat”. It reached #40 on the UK Singles Chart. The track was performed on the Hot Space tour at a faster tempo, with a more rock-oriented arrangement. “Back Chat”, the title, is an English idiom referring to a “impertinent or impudent replies, especially to a superior”.[2] In a Rolling Stone Magazine album review, the critic John Milward described the musical style of the song as: “a hot rock-funk tune, with guitar tracks as slick as an icy dance floor.”[3]

Another One Bites the Dust

“Another One Bites the Dust” is a 1980 song by the British rock band Queen. Written by bass guitarist John Deacon, the song featured on the group’s eighth studio album The Game (1980). The song was a worldwide hit, charting number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks, from October 4 to October 18 (their second number-one single in the country). The song spent fifteen weeks in the Billboard top ten (the longest running top ten song of 1980) and 31 weeks total on the chart (more than any other song in 1980). It reached number two on the Hot Soul Singles chart and the Disco Top 100 chart, and number seven on the UK Singles Chart.[4][5] The song is credited as Queen’s best-selling single, with sales of over 7 million copies.[6] This version was ranked at number 34 on Billboard’s All-Time Top Songs.[7]

The song won an American Music Award for Favorite Rock Single and also garnered a Grammy Award nomination for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.[8][9]

A Night at the Opera (Queen album)

A Night at the Opera is the fourth studio album by the British rock band Queen, released on 21 November 1975. Co-produced by Roy Thomas Baker and Queen, it was the most expensive album ever recorded at the time of its release.[4] The album takes its name from the Marx Brothers film A Night at the Opera, which the band watched one night at the studio complex when recording.[5][6] The album was originally released by EMI Records in the United Kingdom, where it topped the UK Albums Chart for four non-consecutive weeks, and Elektra Records in the United States, where it peaked at No. 4 on the Billboard 200 and became the band’s first platinum selling album in the US. The worldwide sales for the album are currently over 6 million copies.

A Night at the Opera incorporates a wide range of styles, from ballads and songs in a music hall style, to hard rock tracks and progressive rock influences. It also produced the band’s most successful single in the UK, “Bohemian Rhapsody”, which became their first UK number one and one of the best-selling singles in both the UK and the world.

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