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Tiergarten (song)

“Tiergarten” is a song written and performed by Canadian-American singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright. Released in October 2007, it was the third single from Wainwright’s fifth studio album, Release the Stars. A limited edition (500 copies) 12″ vinyl single containing “Supermayer Lost in Tiergarten” was released on October 27. A one-track EP also containing the Supermayer remix was released in the UK through iTunes and 7digital on October 29.[1]

Both the album version and remix of “Tiergarten” failed to chart in any country despite the success of Release the Stars. The remix also appears on the eleventh installment of the Chillout Sessions compilation series.

Sanssouci (song)

“Sanssouci” is a song written by Rufus Wainwright; appearing as a track on his fifth studio album, Release the Stars (2007).[1] The name is a reference to the Sanssouci palace built by Frederick the Great in Potsdam, Germany.

The studio recording of the song used in Release the Stars includes both Wainwright’s sister, Lucy Wainwright Roche, and his long-term friend singer-songwriter Teddy Thompson, on backing vocals.
Originally a French term, the expression “sans souci” translated into English means roughly “without worry”, “without cares”, or “carefree”.

Rules and Regulations (song)

“Rules and Regulations” is a song written and performed by Canadian-American singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright. It was the second single from Wainwright’s fifth studio album, Release the Stars, released digitally via iTunes in the UK on July 30, 2007.
Despite the success of Release the Stars, which reached #2 on the UK Albums Chart,[1] and the performance of “Going to a Town”, the first single from the album that reached #54 on the UK Singles Chart,[2] “Rules and Regulations” failed to chart in any nation. A music video, directed by Petro Papahadjopoulos, was also created to promote the single.

Oh What a World (song)

“Oh What a World” is a song written and performed by Canadian-American singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright. It was released as the second single from Wainwright’s third studio album, Want One (2003), released digitally via iTunes and 7digital in the United Kingdom on November 8, 2004.[2] Promotional copies were also distributed to radio stations in an attempt to increase awareness of the song and album. The song includes several arrangements from Maurice Ravel’s Boléro.

“Oh What a World” also appears on Rufus Wainwright: Live at the Fillmore, the bonus DVD that accompanies Want Two (2004),[3] the repackaged double album released in the UK simply titled Want,[4] and the 2005 compilation album Acoustic 05.[5]

The song contains an interpolation of Maurice Ravel’s Boléro, which premiered in 1928.[6]

Me and Liza

“Me and Liza” is a song by American-Canadian singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright for his greatest hits album, Vibrate: The Best of Rufus Wainwright (2014); it appears as the third track on the album’s standard issue, serving as its lead single.[1] The song is about Wainwright’s relationship with Liza Minnelli, who was reportedly upset by his 2006 tribute concerts to her mother, Judy Garland. It premiered on BBC Radio 2’s Weekend Wogan on January 12, 2014 and was officially released on January 20. “Me and Liza” reached a peak position of number 59 on Belgium’s Ultratop singles chart.

I Don’t Know What It Is

“I Don’t Know What It Is” is a song written and performed by Canadian-American singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright. It was the first single from Wainwright’s third studio album Want One and was released in a slim-line jewel case format on July 26, 2004.[1]
In addition to the UK and Japanese versions of Want One, the song also appears on the bonus DVD that accompanies Want Two (Rufus Wainwright: Live at the Fillmore), All I Want (DVD), and Want, a repackaged UK double album that contains Want One and Want Two.

Going to a Town

“Going to a Town” is a song written and performed by Canadian-American singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright. It was the first single from the album Release the Stars, released on April 3, 2007, in the United States and on May 7 in the United Kingdom.

The music video for the song was directed by Sophie Muller, who also directed Wainwright’s first music video (“April Fools”). The video premiered in April 2007, and Logo aired a 20-minute feature on the making of the video on April 27, 2007 (Making the Video: Going to a Town). The video begins with Wainwright as a D.H. Lawrence-like character, sitting alone at a table in an isolated room. As the video progresses, a large bouquet of roses appears and viewers see Wainwright with a bed cot. Three women emerge, dressed in black clothing and veils, visibly mourning the loss of their husbands. At times, their presence is abstract, digitally projected as if they exist only in Wainwright’s character’s mind. Other times, Wainwright is physically interacting with them within the same room.

Viewers then see images of the roses burning, the women crying, and catching Wainwright as he falls to the ground. With light cast upon him from a single window, they place a laurel wreath on his head. As his arms are spread out and straight across, and light is cast upon him as if by divine intervention, this image is clearly meant to symbolize a crucifixion.

In Making the Video, Wainwright discusses the various images and elements depicted in the music video. He states the song is “an emotional reaction to a lover you had a fight with”, and is about “mourning” and “moving on to bigger and better things.” The three women in the video represent three widows, an element he took from Mozart’s The Magic Flute. One woman represents Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, another Frida Kahlo, and the third a more abstract, “fairy tale-like” woman from The Magic Flute. Later in the interview, Wainwright states the women represent The Three Graces. He claims the burning roses symbolize “purification by fire”, representing the United States–“beautiful, but thorny.” Admitting “Going to a Town” is more about birth than destruction, he believes Americans (at the time the video was made) need to “change things” and “make sacrifices”. The laurel wreath, he says, also represents the US, which “dominates the planet but is in peril of losing democracy.”

In the video, Wainwright wears a suit created by American fashion designer Marc Jacobs.

Cigarettes and Chocolate Milk

“Cigarettes and Chocolate Milk” is a song written and performed by the Canadian-American singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright. It appears as the opening track on his second studio album, Poses (2001).[1] The song addresses decadence and desire, and has been called an “ode to subtle addictions and the way our compulsions rule our lives”.[2][3]
A reprise version of the song appears as the last track on the album.

The music video for the track, directed by Giles Dunning and released by DreamWorks in 2001, features Wainwright performing the song at a piano inside a warehouse, and scenes of him walking around New York City.[4] The audio track of the video is actually the reprise version, with the added percussion backing.

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