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Nobody’s Hero

“Nobody’s Hero” is a song by Canadian progressive rock band Rush, released as the third single from their 1993 album Counterparts.[1] The first stanza deals with the AIDS-related death of a homosexual man named Ellis, a friend of Neil Peart when Peart lived in London. After the chorus, the second stanza speaks of a girl who was murdered in Peart’s hometown, Port Dalhousie. The girl is rumoured to have been Kristen French, one of Paul Bernardo’s victims.[citation needed]

It inspired the title for the paper Nobody’s Hero: On Equal Protection, Homosexuality, and National Security by published in The George Washington Law Review.[2]

Stick It Out (Rush song)

“Stick It Out” is a song and single by the progressive rock band Rush from their 1993 album Counterparts. The song charted at #1 on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks chart.

A music video was made for the song. It was briefly featured on an episode of Beavis and Butt-head. The song has been featured live on several tours including the Counterparts, Test For Echo and Time Machine Tours.

Ghost of a Chance (Rush song)

“Ghost of a Chance” is the third single from Rush’s 1991 album Roll the Bones. The single peaked at #2 on the U.S. Mainstream Rock chart. The lyrics focus on finding love, and as its strength over any other force.

Although the song was a radio hit at the time of its release, it has rarely been performed live. It was most recently featured on the 2008 leg of the Snakes & Arrows Tour.

Heresy (Rush song)

Heresy is a song written by and performed by Rush and appears on their 1991 album Roll the Bones. The song is about the fall of communism in Eastern Europe and Russia, resultant about-face consumerism and the passing of the Cold War nuclear threat.

Like the rest of the album Roll the Bones, “Heresy” also marks the transition from the band’s 1980s style to their sound of the 1990s where guitars are a prominent part of this song and keyboard and organ are played in the background. As with the vast majority of Rush songs since the album Fly by Night, Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson composed the song’s music while Neil Peart wrote the lyrics.

The percussion aspect of this song was noted in the Roll the Bones Tour program. Neil Peart explains,

“The drum part in this song was inspired by a different part of the world. One hot night I lay under the stars on a rooftop in Togo and heard the sound of drums from across the valley. Even on the edge of sleep the drumming moved me, the rhythm stayed in my head, and while working on this song I used variations of it and other West African influences.” [1]

Roll the Bones (song)

Roll the Bones is the title track and second single from Rush’s 1991 album of the same name.

The music of “Roll the Bones” was written by Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson, and its lyrics by Neil Peart. The lyrics reflect on taking chances in life, and urging those unsure to “roll the bones,” a term used for dice. But the bottom line…is to take the chance, roll the bones, if it’s a random universe and that’s terrifying and it makes you neurotic and everything, never mind. You really have to take the chance or else nothing’s going to happen.”
– Neil Peart, “It’s A Rap” interview, February 1992[1]

As a “lyrical experiment”, Peart wrote a “rap” section in his lyrics, as a result of listening to “the better rap writers”, like LL Cool J and Public Enemy.[2] The band considered seeking out a real rapper to perform this section of the song, or even considered approaching the section with a camp or comedic sensibility, and hiring singer-songwriter Robbie Robertson or actor/comedian John Cleese.[2] According to Geddy Lee, “We couldn’t make up our minds really if we wanted to be influenced by rap or satirize it, so I think that song kind of falls between the cracks and in the end I think it came out to be neither, it came out to be something that is very much us.”[2] Ultimately, the “rap” was performed by Lee: his altered voice is achieved through a drastic lowering of pitch and adding various effects.

Dreamline

“Dreamline” is the opening track and first single from Rush’s 1991 album Roll the Bones. The song peaked at number one on the U.S. Mainstream Rock Tracks chart, and is a staple for live performances by Rush, having been performed on every tour from the inaugural Roll the Bones Tour until the 2010 and 2011 Time Machine Tour, when it was dropped. It was performed during the subsequent Clockwork Angels Tour, where it was accompanied by the Clockwork Angels string ensemble and a video with a dedication to Neil Armstrong. It was dropped again on the 2015 R40 Tour. When played live, the band uses laser lights based on the tempo of the guitar, as well as slightly protracting the midsection where Alex Lifeson integrates an extended guitar solo.

Time Stand Still (song)

Time Stand Still is a single by the progressive band Rush that was featured on their 1987 album Hold Your Fire.[1] A music video for the song was directed by Zbigniew Rybczyński. Released as a single in 1987 credited to “Rush (featuring Aimee Mann)”, “Time Stand Still” peaked at No. 3 on the U.S. mainstream rock charts. It was also a minor hit single in the United Kingdom, peaking at No. 42 on the Singles Chart. The song received positive reviews from critics and remains a fan favorite.

Mystic Rhythms

“Mystic Rhythms” is a single featured on the Rush album Power Windows. The single charted at #21 on the U.S. Mainstream Rock chart.[1] The song was featured on several compilation albums[1] and was performed live by the band on their Power Windows, Counterparts and R30 tours, appearing on the live album A Show of Hands and the live DVD R30: 30th Anniversary World Tour. For this song, drummer Neil Peart utilized his electronic drum kit, playing it on the album and in concert during live performances of the track.

It was released as a single in Japan and was used as the opening song of the NBC news program 1986.[2]

The music video for the single was directed by Gerald Casale, who is a member of Devo.

Marathon (Rush song)

“Marathon” is the 4th track on Canadian rock band Rush’s 1985 album Power Windows. It was released as a single 4 years later in 1989 and reached #6 on the US Mainstream Rock chart.

It is written by Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson and bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Geddy Lee, and its lyrics are written by drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. The lyrics depict how one would feel while running in an actual marathon, but the meaning of the song is meant to use a marathon (an extreme challenge) as a metaphor for life, and say that life is full of obstacles and is all about achieving one’s personal goals.

In an 1986 interview, Peart said “(Marathon) is about the triumph of time and a kind of message to myself (because I think life is too short for all the things that I want to do), there’s a self-admonition saying that life is long enough. You can do a lot — just don’t burn yourself out too fast trying to do everything at once. Marathon is a song about individual goals and trying to achieve them. And it’s also about the old Chinese proverb: ‘The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”

“Marathon” is the 4th track on Canadian rock band Rush’s 1985 album Power Windows. It was released as a single 4 years later in 1989 and reached #6 on the US Mainstream Rock chart.

It is written by Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson and bassist/vocalist/keyboardist Geddy Lee, and its lyrics are written by drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. The lyrics depict how one would feel while running in an actual marathon, but the meaning of the song is meant to use a marathon (an extreme challenge) as a metaphor for life, and say that life is full of obstacles and is all about achieving one’s personal goals.

In an 1986 interview, Peart said “(Marathon) is about the triumph of time and a kind of message to myself (because I think life is too short for all the things that I want to do), there’s a self-admonition saying that life is long enough. You can do a lot — just don’t burn yourself out too fast trying to do everything at once. Marathon is a song about individual goals and trying to achieve them. And it’s also about the old Chinese proverb: ‘The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”

Manhattan Project (song)

Manhattan Project is a 1985 song by Canadian progressive rock band Rush, named for the WWII project that created the first atomic bomb. Lyricist Neil Peart read ten books about the Manhattan Project before writing the lyrics so that he had a proper understanding of what the project was really about.[citation needed] This song appeared on the 1985 album Power Windows, Rush’s eleventh studio album. “Manhattan Project” is the third track on the album, and clocks in at 5:07. It consists of four verses, addressing:

1) A time, during the era of World War II,

2) A man, a scientist (such as J. Robert Oppenheimer),

3) A place, Los Alamos in New Mexico,

4) A man, Enola Gay pilot and mission commander Paul Tibbets.

The chorus refers to the explosion as “the big bang”, in allusion to the start of a new universe following the singular event, repeating the theme of the verses marking when and/or where “it all began”. While nuclear warfare may be seen as the ultimate pinnacle of human fear, lyricist Neil Peart does not include this song as being part of Rush’s Fear series. Rush performed the song live on their Power Windows, Hold Your Fire, Presto, and Clockwork Angels tours.

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