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We’ll Bring the House Down (song)

“We’ll Bring The House Down” is a single from rock band Slade from their 1981 album of the same name.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. After years of touring in small venues and releasing a string of unsuccessful singles and albums, the single was the first Top Thirty hit for Slade since 1976, peaking at number ten in the UK during a chart run of nine weeks.[2] This was largely thanks to the Reading festival the year before after Ozzy Osbourne’s band had pulled out at the last minute and Slade agreed to step in instead. The band stole the show and became hot news once again.[3]

In 2003, the song was sampled by Overseer for the track titled Slayed which was also the name of Slade’s 1972 album.[4]

As well as peaking at No. 10 in the UK, the single peaked at No. 4 in the Melody Maker charts.[5]

We Won’t Give In

“We Won’t Give In” is the final single from the album You Boyz Make Big Noize by rock band Slade. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea.[1]

The single was released in late 1987, failing to chart in the top 100, the first for a Slade single since the 1981 single “Knuckle Sandwich Nancy”. The single was confirmed by BBC at the time to have peaked outside the top 100 at #121 in the UK.[2][3]

Universe (Slade song)

“Universe” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the compilation album Wall of Hits. Like the previous single “Radio Wall of Sound”, it was written solely by bassist Jim Lea. The B-side for the single, “Red Hot”, was written by guitarist Dave Hill with Wizzard’s ex-keyboardist Bill Hunt.[1] The single was released in early 1992 after the Christmas market. Despite numerous TV performances and a promo video, the single failed to enter the top 100.[2] This became the last single under the original band as Noddy Holder effectively retired shortly after whilst bassist Jim Lea followed the same path.[3] Both guitarist Dave Hill and drummer Don Powell decided to carry their career on under the name of Slade 2.[4] In 2007, Jim Lea remade this track for his solo album Therapy.[5]

The single peaked at #755 for 1992 on Rate Your Music.[6]

The Bangin’ Man

“The Bangin’ Man” is a single from English rock band Slade. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1974 and peaked at #3 in the UK, spending 7 weeks on the chart. The first week in the charts, the single peaked at #4 and stayed in the top ten for 4 weeks.[1]

Shortly after release, the single was given a Silver Disc for sales of over 250,000.[2][3]

The song would appear on the American version of the 1974 album Slade in Flame, which was released via Warner Bros. Records during 1975. It did not feature on any other version of the album, and was therefore exclusive to the United States.[4]

That’s What Friends Are For (Slade song)

That’s What Friends Are For is a song from rock band Slade which was released as the second single from the 1987 album You Boyz Make Big Noize. The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. It was produced by Roy Thomas Baker.[1]

Following the band’s moderate success with the 1985 album Rogues Gallery, the band started recording their next album in 1986. The band hoped that the album, if it could become a commercial success, would catapult the band to where they felt they belonged. The first single “Still The Same” was released in February 1987 but stalled at #73 in the UK chart.[2] “That’s What Friends Are For” was the album’s next single, rush-released in April 1987 shortly after the album’s own release. Despite being another radio-friendly song with a pop-based sound using synthesizers and a mass-group vocal chorus, the single only peaked at #95 in the UK, spending just one week on the chart in early May that year.[3] Partly due to the band’s lack of commercial success from the beginning of 1985, the song was to be Slade’s last UK release under RCA Records, although RCA would agree to distribute the following Cheapskate Records single “You Boyz Make Big Noize” in July 1987, and also issued the final Slade RCA single “Ooh La La in L.A.” in America and Germany only around the same time. The single came from Slade’s final studio album.[4]

The song’s producer Roy Thomas Baker would also produce the album track “Love is Like a Rock” from the same album however, due to his costly and time consuming style of working, he used most of the album’s budget on the two tracks alone. As a result, he had to be dropped from producing any further tracks, although he did start work on a third; the album closer “It’s Hard Having Fun Nowadays”. “That’s What Friends Are For” was recorded at Wessex Studios, which was the same studio used for the recordings of “Love is Like a Rock” and part of “The Roaring Silence”.[5]

Thanks for the Memory (Wham Bam Thank You Mam)

Thanks for the Memory (Wham Bam Thank You Mam) is a single from rock band Slade.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1975 and peaked at #7 in the UK, spending 7 weeks on the chart and only one week in the top 10. This became Slade’s last top ten hit for 6 years.[2] It is notable for the use of keyboard – at the time new to a Slade single although piano and organ had been used in previous material.[3]

Record Mirror magazine voted the single #10 on the top 10 best singles in February 1976.[4]

The song appeared on the American version of the 1974 album Slade in Flame, which was released via Warner Bros. Records during 1975.[5]

Take Me Bak ‘Ome

“Tak Me Bak ‘Ome” is a popular single by Slade.

Written by Jim Lea and Noddy Holder and produced by Chas Chandler, “Tak Me Bak ‘Ome” was the second of Slade’s six UK number one singles spending a single week at the top in July 1972. The single took 5 weeks to reach the top and was last seen on the charts at #49 on 26/08/1972. It stayed in the top 100 for a total of 13 weeks.[1]

A total of five different artworks were created for the single.[2]

By October 1972, the band had received two UK Silver Discs for the single.[3][4]

Still the Same (Slade song)

“Still the Same” is a song from rock band Slade which was released as the leading single from the 1987 album You Boyz Make Big Noize. The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. It was produced by John Punter.[1]

Following the band’s moderate success with the 1985 album Rogues Gallery, the band started recording their next album in 1986. The band hoped that the album, if it could become a commercial success, would catapult the band to where they felt they belonged. The song “Still the Same” was chosen as the album’s leading single, where it was released in February 1987. The key decision was to avoid the Christmas period of 1986, as the band’s 1973 festive hit “Merry Xmas Everybody” had often given Slade the image of being a Christmas only band. As a result, Slade usually exploited the seasonal attention by releasing new product. Although this benefited the band in some ways, Slade’s connection with the festive season had not allowed Slade to develop the commercial and artistic credibility that they felt they deserved. This led the band and their record label, RCA Records, to hold back “Still the Same” from release until two months after Christmas. The song was chosen by the record company as a single, as they hoped the track’s anthemic sing-a-long style would reproduce the success of “My Oh My” – a power ballad hit the band had in 1983. Released over a year since the last Slade single “Do You Believe in Miracles”, which caused rumours of the band’s split, “Still the Same” failed to become a big hit, largely due to lack of radio play, and peaked at #73 in the UK, lasting a total of four weeks in the Top 100.[2] This immediately raised the question of whether the single would have done better at Christmas, although, despite the radio-friendly sound, the song’s lyrical message was not a happy message. Writer Chris Ingham, who wrote the notes for Slade’s remastered CD releases via Salvo, described the song as being “about a couple’s inability to evolve”, and as a result was not festive fare.[3] The song has been reported as being personal to Holder, with the lyrics dealing with his own marriage to Leandra Holder, which ended in 1984 largely due to his touring commitments with Slade.

Slam the Hammer Down

“Slam the Hammer Down” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the album The Amazing Kamikaze Syndrome and its U.S. counterpart album, titled Keep Your Hands Off My Power Supply.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1984 within the U.S. only. Although the single was officially only a promo,[2] the track peaked at No.92 on the U.S. Billboard charts.[3] This followed the success of Slade’s two previous singles “Run Runaway,” which peaked at No.20, and “My Oh My,” which peaked at No.37.[4]

The track was performed at the Montreux festival along with “Run Runaway” in 1984.[5]

The promo release via CBS contained two remixes (Hot Mix/Hotter Mix), both remixed by Shep Pettibone.

In the September–December 1986 Slade fan club magazine, poll results were announced for the 1986 opinion poll based on Slade’s material. For the best album track, “Slam the Hammer Down” placed at number three.

Skweeze Me, Pleeze Me

“Skweeze Me, Pleeze Me” is a popular song in the UK by Slade.[1]

Written by Noddy Holder and Jim Lea and produced by Chas Chandler, Skweeze Me, Pleeze Me was the band’s fifth number one single in the United Kingdom, and their second to debut at the top spot immediately, spending three weeks at the top in July 1973.[2] Typical of Slade’s releases at the time, it fared less well in the US where it failed to reach the Billboard Hot 100 but also peaked at #1 in Ireland.

For the Record Mirror poll results of 1974, the single peaked at #9 on the top ten list of best British singles.[3]

The single sold 300,000 copies in the first week of release.[4][5]

The single was certified UK Silver by BPI in July 1973.[6]

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