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We’ll Bring the House Down (song)

“We’ll Bring The House Down” is a single from rock band Slade from their 1981 album of the same name.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. After years of touring in small venues and releasing a string of unsuccessful singles and albums, the single was the first Top Thirty hit for Slade since 1976, peaking at number ten in the UK during a chart run of nine weeks.[2] This was largely thanks to the Reading festival the year before after Ozzy Osbourne’s band had pulled out at the last minute and Slade agreed to step in instead. The band stole the show and became hot news once again.[3]

In 2003, the song was sampled by Overseer for the track titled Slayed which was also the name of Slade’s 1972 album.[4]

As well as peaking at No. 10 in the UK, the single peaked at No. 4 in the Melody Maker charts.[5]

We Won’t Give In

“We Won’t Give In” is the final single from the album You Boyz Make Big Noize by rock band Slade. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea.[1]

The single was released in late 1987, failing to chart in the top 100, the first for a Slade single since the 1981 single “Knuckle Sandwich Nancy”. The single was confirmed by BBC at the time to have peaked outside the top 100 at #121 in the UK.[2][3]

Universe (Slade song)

“Universe” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the compilation album Wall of Hits. Like the previous single “Radio Wall of Sound”, it was written solely by bassist Jim Lea. The B-side for the single, “Red Hot”, was written by guitarist Dave Hill with Wizzard’s ex-keyboardist Bill Hunt.[1] The single was released in early 1992 after the Christmas market. Despite numerous TV performances and a promo video, the single failed to enter the top 100.[2] This became the last single under the original band as Noddy Holder effectively retired shortly after whilst bassist Jim Lea followed the same path.[3] Both guitarist Dave Hill and drummer Don Powell decided to carry their career on under the name of Slade 2.[4] In 2007, Jim Lea remade this track for his solo album Therapy.[5]

The single peaked at #755 for 1992 on Rate Your Music.[6]

The Bangin’ Man

“The Bangin’ Man” is a single from English rock band Slade. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1974 and peaked at #3 in the UK, spending 7 weeks on the chart. The first week in the charts, the single peaked at #4 and stayed in the top ten for 4 weeks.[1]

Shortly after release, the single was given a Silver Disc for sales of over 250,000.[2][3]

The song would appear on the American version of the 1974 album Slade in Flame, which was released via Warner Bros. Records during 1975. It did not feature on any other version of the album, and was therefore exclusive to the United States.[4]

That’s What Friends Are For (Slade song)

That’s What Friends Are For is a song from rock band Slade which was released as the second single from the 1987 album You Boyz Make Big Noize. The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. It was produced by Roy Thomas Baker.[1]

Following the band’s moderate success with the 1985 album Rogues Gallery, the band started recording their next album in 1986. The band hoped that the album, if it could become a commercial success, would catapult the band to where they felt they belonged. The first single “Still The Same” was released in February 1987 but stalled at #73 in the UK chart.[2] “That’s What Friends Are For” was the album’s next single, rush-released in April 1987 shortly after the album’s own release. Despite being another radio-friendly song with a pop-based sound using synthesizers and a mass-group vocal chorus, the single only peaked at #95 in the UK, spending just one week on the chart in early May that year.[3] Partly due to the band’s lack of commercial success from the beginning of 1985, the song was to be Slade’s last UK release under RCA Records, although RCA would agree to distribute the following Cheapskate Records single “You Boyz Make Big Noize” in July 1987, and also issued the final Slade RCA single “Ooh La La in L.A.” in America and Germany only around the same time. The single came from Slade’s final studio album.[4]

The song’s producer Roy Thomas Baker would also produce the album track “Love is Like a Rock” from the same album however, due to his costly and time consuming style of working, he used most of the album’s budget on the two tracks alone. As a result, he had to be dropped from producing any further tracks, although he did start work on a third; the album closer “It’s Hard Having Fun Nowadays”. “That’s What Friends Are For” was recorded at Wessex Studios, which was the same studio used for the recordings of “Love is Like a Rock” and part of “The Roaring Silence”.[5]

Thanks for the Memory (Wham Bam Thank You Mam)

Thanks for the Memory (Wham Bam Thank You Mam) is a single from rock band Slade.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1975 and peaked at #7 in the UK, spending 7 weeks on the chart and only one week in the top 10. This became Slade’s last top ten hit for 6 years.[2] It is notable for the use of keyboard – at the time new to a Slade single although piano and organ had been used in previous material.[3]

Record Mirror magazine voted the single #10 on the top 10 best singles in February 1976.[4]

The song appeared on the American version of the 1974 album Slade in Flame, which was released via Warner Bros. Records during 1975.[5]

Take Me Bak ‘Ome

“Tak Me Bak ‘Ome” is a popular single by Slade.

Written by Jim Lea and Noddy Holder and produced by Chas Chandler, “Tak Me Bak ‘Ome” was the second of Slade’s six UK number one singles spending a single week at the top in July 1972. The single took 5 weeks to reach the top and was last seen on the charts at #49 on 26/08/1972. It stayed in the top 100 for a total of 13 weeks.[1]

A total of five different artworks were created for the single.[2]

By October 1972, the band had received two UK Silver Discs for the single.[3][4]

Still the Same (Slade song)

“Still the Same” is a song from rock band Slade which was released as the leading single from the 1987 album You Boyz Make Big Noize. The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. It was produced by John Punter.[1]

Following the band’s moderate success with the 1985 album Rogues Gallery, the band started recording their next album in 1986. The band hoped that the album, if it could become a commercial success, would catapult the band to where they felt they belonged. The song “Still the Same” was chosen as the album’s leading single, where it was released in February 1987. The key decision was to avoid the Christmas period of 1986, as the band’s 1973 festive hit “Merry Xmas Everybody” had often given Slade the image of being a Christmas only band. As a result, Slade usually exploited the seasonal attention by releasing new product. Although this benefited the band in some ways, Slade’s connection with the festive season had not allowed Slade to develop the commercial and artistic credibility that they felt they deserved. This led the band and their record label, RCA Records, to hold back “Still the Same” from release until two months after Christmas. The song was chosen by the record company as a single, as they hoped the track’s anthemic sing-a-long style would reproduce the success of “My Oh My” – a power ballad hit the band had in 1983. Released over a year since the last Slade single “Do You Believe in Miracles”, which caused rumours of the band’s split, “Still the Same” failed to become a big hit, largely due to lack of radio play, and peaked at #73 in the UK, lasting a total of four weeks in the Top 100.[2] This immediately raised the question of whether the single would have done better at Christmas, although, despite the radio-friendly sound, the song’s lyrical message was not a happy message. Writer Chris Ingham, who wrote the notes for Slade’s remastered CD releases via Salvo, described the song as being “about a couple’s inability to evolve”, and as a result was not festive fare.[3] The song has been reported as being personal to Holder, with the lyrics dealing with his own marriage to Leandra Holder, which ended in 1984 largely due to his touring commitments with Slade.

Slam the Hammer Down

“Slam the Hammer Down” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the album The Amazing Kamikaze Syndrome and its U.S. counterpart album, titled Keep Your Hands Off My Power Supply.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1984 within the U.S. only. Although the single was officially only a promo,[2] the track peaked at No.92 on the U.S. Billboard charts.[3] This followed the success of Slade’s two previous singles “Run Runaway,” which peaked at No.20, and “My Oh My,” which peaked at No.37.[4]

The track was performed at the Montreux festival along with “Run Runaway” in 1984.[5]

The promo release via CBS contained two remixes (Hot Mix/Hotter Mix), both remixed by Shep Pettibone.

In the September–December 1986 Slade fan club magazine, poll results were announced for the 1986 opinion poll based on Slade’s material. For the best album track, “Slam the Hammer Down” placed at number three.

Skweeze Me, Pleeze Me

“Skweeze Me, Pleeze Me” is a popular song in the UK by Slade.[1]

Written by Noddy Holder and Jim Lea and produced by Chas Chandler, Skweeze Me, Pleeze Me was the band’s fifth number one single in the United Kingdom, and their second to debut at the top spot immediately, spending three weeks at the top in July 1973.[2] Typical of Slade’s releases at the time, it fared less well in the US where it failed to reach the Billboard Hot 100 but also peaked at #1 in Ireland.

For the Record Mirror poll results of 1974, the single peaked at #9 on the top ten list of best British singles.[3]

The single sold 300,000 copies in the first week of release.[4][5]

The single was certified UK Silver by BPI in July 1973.[6]

Run Runaway

“Run Runaway” is a hard rock song performed by the English band Slade. The song was written by Jim Lea and Noddy Holder and was on their 1983 album The Amazing Kamikaze Syndrome. It reached No. 7 in the UK Singles Chart,[1] and proved to be the band’s last U.K. Top 10 hit single.

The Amazing Kamikaze Syndrome album was released in 1984 in the United States with a different track listing under the title Keep Your Hands Off My Power Supply. That same year, the single “Run Runaway” became the band’s biggest American hit, benefiting from heavy play on MTV, peaking at No. 20 and spending a total of eight weeks on the Billboard Hot 100’s Top 40. It was also number one for two weeks on the Billboard Top Tracks chart.[2]

The single was included on Canada’s official ‘Top 100 Singles of 1984′ chart, where Run Runaway peaked at No. 84.

The melody is inspired by the hymn “There Is a Happy Land.” Holder himself summed the song up as “a rocky Scottish jig.”

Dave Thompson, from allmusic described the song as “building on the anthemic power of the earlier “My Oh My” – itself their biggest U.K. single in nine years – “Run Runaway” is raucous chanting, swirling guitars, wild violin, and even a taste of heavy metal bagpipes, helped along by a drum sound that is pure early ’80s.”

After being asked for his favourite Slade song, vocalist Noddy Holder replied that although “Far Far Away” was his favourite, hearing “Run Runaway” on the radio a few days before the interview really knocked him out.[3][4]

For the September–December 1986 Slade fan club magazine, Lea was interviewed and was asked to share where he was when he wrote various Slade tracks. For “Run Runaway,” Lea stated it was written whilst he was holding a conversation with someone.

In a mid-1989 Slade fan club magazine interview, Don Powell was asked if there was a Slade track that he felt was one of the band’s best efforts on record. Powell replied stated that “Standin’ On The Corner” from the 1975 album Slade in Flame was a favourite. Powell also stated “The 12” version of Run Runaway, I liked doing that one as well.”[5][6]

In the September–December 1986 Slade fan club magazine, the poll results were announced for the 1986 opinion poll based on Slade’s material. For the best single of the 80s, “Run Runaway” placed at No. 2.

The song is played frequently at UMass-Amherst basketball games.

Ruby Red (song)

“Ruby Red” is a UK only single from rock band Slade which appeared on the album Till Deaf Do Us Part.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1982 and peaked at No. 51 in the UK, spending 3 weeks on the chart.[2] The single was a gatefold with two live tracks as an extra.[3] The promo video remained unreleased at the time of the single’s release.[4]

In a 1981 interview with singer Noddy Holder for the Slade fan club Noddy stated “it’s a number that we’ve had around for a long time. Me and Jim wrote it maybe two or three years ago. We tried to record it before but we never managed to get it down how we actually wanted it. Recently, when we were looking through the songs that we’d got for the album, we remembered that we’d never been able to get Ruby Red down on tape properly, but that it was a good, strong, commercial sound. So we added some new riffs to it and got it down and it’s a good commercial song. It might be in line for the next single”.[5]

In the September–December 1986 Slade fan club magazine, the poll results were announced for the 1986 opinion poll based on Slade’s material. For the best single picture sleeve, Ruby Red placed at No. 1.

Rock ‘n’ Roll Bolero

Rock ‘n’ Roll Bolero is a non-album single from the rock band Slade. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released via Barn Records on 6 October 1978 and failed to appear in the UK chart.[1]

Much like most of Slade’s singles of the time, this song failed to make any impact upon release, continuing the band’s low popularity. It was the fourth single to fail the UK chart since the band’s rise to fame, following the failure of the previous football themed single “Give Us a Goal”.[2]

The single was released on 7″ vinyl only in the UK, Germany and Belgium.[1][3]

The song featured the return of Lea’s electric violin, the first time on a single since 1971, recalling the band’s first number one hit “Coz I Luv You”.[4]

This was the band’s second single to be produced by themselves, the first being the previous single “Give Us a Goal”.[5] The b-side “It’s Alright Buy Me” was exclusive to the single, eventually appearing on CD via the 2007 Salvo compilation B-Sides[6] and the remaster of the 1977 album Whatever Happened to Slade.[7] The b-side’s lyrics refer to being on the road for touring.

“Rock ‘n’ Roll Bolero” was later included as a bonus track on the remaster of the 1977 album Whatever Happened to Slade, the 2006 Japanese Air Mail Archive remaster of the 1979 album Return to Base, and part of the 2006 four-disc box set The Slade Box. It was also included on the unofficial 2006 Groove Master release Gospel According to Noddy!.[8]

In the UK, no artwork was included with the single, whilst in Germany, the artwork used the same photos of the band from the 1978 live album Slade Alive Vol 2, which would be released later in the month. In Belgium, the artwork was the same but in black and white instead.[3]

In the September–December 1986 Slade fan club magazine, the poll results were announced for the 1986 opinion poll based on Slade’s material. For the best non-hit singles, Rock ‘n’ Roll Bolero placed at #2.[9]

In recent years, the track has become increasingly popular, gathering approx 80,000 views on YouTube.[10]

A vinyl acetate of the single is known to exist.[11]
Roger Taylor of Queen has, at times, closed his own solo shows with a rendition of the song. In In a MTV news article of 31 March 1999, author Angela Solomon spoke of a concert the day before at Wolverhampton’s Wulfrun Hall, where the drummer was joined on stage by his former bandmate Brian May. The article had stated “But the real screams came when Taylor unveiled his surprise, on the second encore of the night. “Ladies and gentlemen, joining us tonight is Sir Brian May!” Silhouetted against white light and smoke, May, Queen’s lead guitarist and the force behind much of their heavy-rock sound, strutted onstage to thunderous applause and foot-stamping, his distinctive hair and profile unchanged since the band’s heyday. Through the maze of waving hands, he grabbed a guitar, played a few chords to warm up and then launched with Taylor into a stomping rendition of Slade’s “Rock and Roll Bolero.”[12][13]

Rock and Roll Preacher (Hallelujah I’m On Fire)

“Rock and Roll Preacher (Hallelujah I’m On Fire)” is a single from rock band Slade, released in 1982 from the album Till Deaf Do Us Part. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released as a single in Germany only and peaked at #49 on the chart.[1]

The track replaced Dizzy Mama as an opener for each live concert. The song opens the 1982 album Slade on Stage as a result. The track has been covered by Sapo and The Sirens.[2]

Although no promotional video was created for the track, it was mimed on German TV at the time of release.[3]

The single was released on 7 inch and 12 inch vinyl. Unlike the 7 inch, the 12 inch version is extended, using the album version of the track which features Holder delivering a mock ceremony of the communion of rock and roll.[4] For the 7″ single, Rock and Roll Preacher was edited down from 5:34 to 3:17, most likely in order to gain radio plays.

The b-side Knuckle Sandwich Nancy was a single released in the UK earlier that year.[5]

In the September-December 1986 Slade fan club magazine, the poll results were announced for the 1986 opinion poll based on Slade’s material. For the best album track, Rock and Roll Preacher (Hallelujah I’m on Fire) placed at #1. In the same 1986 poll, for the best live song, Rock and Roll Preacher (Hallelujah I’m on Fire) placed at #2.

Radio Wall of Sound

“Radio Wall of Sound” is a song by the English rock band, Slade, issued as a single in 1991. It was included on their compilation album, Wall of Hits.[1]

The song was the first to be credited solely by Jim Lea since “I Won’t Let it ‘Appen Agen”, from the 1973 album Slayed?.[2] It was sung by Lea, with Noddy Holder joining with him in the chorus.[3] The B-side, “Lay Your Love on the Line”, was written by Dave Hill and former Wizzard member Bill Hunt. The track was originally for a solo project of Jim Lea.[3] The recording of the track already existed, complete apart from lead vocals. The track was not in Holder’s key and so his vocals were dubbed into the chorus, leaving Lea’s lead vocal on the verses.[4] The track also features Radio One DJ Mike Read as ‘the voice of radio’.[5]

In the 1990s, Jim Lea was interviewed by Ken Sharpe. Lea explained the track’s meaning which was about having a radio and music playing inside your own mind.[6][7]

The song appeared on the various artists compilation “Now That’s What I Call Music! 20”, released 30 November 1991.

In 2001, English vocalist and musician Mick White recorded a version of the track for the tribute album Slade Remade.[8]

Ooh La La in L.A.

“Ooh La La in L.A.” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the album You Boyz Make Big Noize.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was the band’s last to be released via RCA during the summer of 1987, with the American release being via CBS. Being released in America and Germany only, the single failed to chart in either top 100.[2]

Hill spoke about the track in 1987, “This is my favourite track on the album. There is something about the chorus on this one, which to me would make it a hit if it was released as a single. It is a very different sort of song for Slade. The lyric is very autobiographical. One verse is about Don being pissed all the time. There is mention of the Marquee, which refers to ‘The Sunset Marquee’, where a lot of bands stay. There is a verse about ‘Barney’s Beanery’, where we used to play pool all the time. This song was in fact written originally for the ‘Rogues Gallery’ album and is based on the last time we were in L.A, promoting Run Runaway”.[3] The track also referenced the brief headline news that drummer Don Powell (referred to by his middle name George in the lyrics), had become the boyfriend of Bob Dylan’s daughter (referred to as ‘Miss Zimmerman’ in the lyrics).[4]

Nobody’s Fool (Slade song)

“Nobody’s Fool” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the album Nobody’s Fools. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1976 and did not enter the UK Top 50 Singles chart. This was unusual for Slade whose previous 17 singles entered the top 20.[1] However it did reach #3 on the BMRB’s UK Breakers chart on 24 April 1976 (which would be equal to #53 on the UK Singles Chart (at a time when the national singles chart only ran to the Top 50).[2]

From this single, the band found themselves in a commercial decline after UK fans accused the band of ‘selling out’ and forgetting about their fanbase in the UK, as the band had been in the States for most of 1975, trying to crack the market. The single featured Tasha Thomas doing backing vocals – the first time a Slade single featured any female backing.[3]

The single A-side features an edited piano introduction, compared to the album version.

The b-side, “L.A. Jinx”, tells of the bad luck that Slade always seemed to accompany the band whenever they played L.A.[3]

“Nobody’s Fool” has been covered by Light Fantastic, Britny Fox and also The Dummies which was a project of Slade’s bassist Jim Lea.[4]

Myzsterious Mizster Jones

“Myzsterious Mizster Jones” is a song from rock band Slade which was released as the third single from the 1985 album Rogues Gallery. The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. It was produced by John Punter.[1]

Following the band’s Top 15 success with the late 1984 single “All Join Hands”, the band’s follow-up January 1985 single “7 Year Bitch” stalled at #60 in the UK chart after it was banned by the UK broadcasting media. It was hoped that the single would boost the band’s popularity back up after the commercial failure of “7 Year Bitch”. Despite a radio-friendly sound, the numerous TV appearances across Europe and a promo video, the single only peaked at #50 in the UK, spending a total of five weeks on the charts.[2]

The single was released just two weeks before Rogues Gallery, originally entering the UK chart at #61. The following week the single had peaked at #50. By 6 April 1985, both “Myzsterious Mizster Jones” and Rogues Gallery were in the charts. Since Rogues Gallery had entered at #60, “Myzsterious Mizster Jones” fell back to #57, #60 and #70, respectively.

The title of the song was purposely misspelled. Such misspellings were a hallmark of some of Slade’s song titles during the early 1970s, but this was the band’s first single with such a title for more than a decade.

In a 1985 interview with Holder on Australian TV, Holder was asked “The current single Myzsterious Mizster Jones, what’s that all about?” Holder replied “Oh, basically it’s about a friend of mine from Wolverhampton who used to be a Hell’s Angel actually, but I changed his name to protect the innocent cause I don’t think he’d like a song about him. It’s not knocking him, you know, but it’s a song about him.” The interviewer concluded “Okay. We’ll have a look at it now.” as the video was aired on Australian TV.[3]

My Oh My (Slade song)

“My Oh My” is a power ballad originally sung by rock band Slade. The song appears on their album The Amazing Kamikaze Syndrome (released in 1983) and on the band’s 1984 American counterpart release, Keep Your Hands Off My Power Supply. The song reached number two in the UK chart by Christmas 1983 and soon after became the band’s second US Top 40 hit, reaching number 37. The single was kept from the #1 spot in the UK by The Flying Pickets cover of Only You. The single’s chart run in the UK began at only #73, the following week it had moved into the top 40 at #36 and the week after it made #15. After, it stayed in the top 10 for 5 weeks.[1]

Slade re-recorded the song in swing-style for the b-side of the single “Do You Believe in Miracles?”, released in 1985. This version was apparently suggested by Frank Sinatra and was recorded with the Monty Babson Big Band. Holder did his vocal in one take after an evening in the pub.

The single was certified UK Gold by BPI in January 1984.[2] In Sweden, the song topped the chart and was awarded in 1984 with a Swedish Platinum Award for sales in excess of 50,000.[3]

My Friend Stan

“My Friend Stan” (stylised as “MY FRIEИD STAИ”)is a single from glam rock band Slade which appeared on Slade’s 1974 album Old New Borrowed and Blue.[1] The single was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in late 1973 and peaked at #2 in the UK, spending only 8 weeks on the chart which compared to Slade’s eight previous singles was a disappointment. The single originally entered the charts at #4.[2] The single marked a change from their previous records with the single being more piano based, sounding more like a novelty track.[3]

Despite only reaching #2 in the UK, the single sold the same amount as the previous single “Skweeze Me, Pleeze Me”.[4][5]

The single was certified UK Silver by BPI in October 1973.[6]

Mama Weer All Crazee Now

“Mama Weer All Crazee Now” is a song originally recorded by the British glam rock band Slade on their album Slayed?.

Written by Jim Lea and Noddy Holder and produced by Chas Chandler, it was the band’s third number-one single in the United Kingdom. The single entered the charts on its first week at #2, then followed by #1 for the next 3 weeks in September 1972. It was last seen in the top 100 on 4 November 1972 at #39.[1] The single fared less well in the USA, where it peaked at #76. It also topped the chart in Ireland.

Besides its commercial success, the song has also received critical acclaim, with the musical magazine Record Mirror labeling it as “full of sheer bloody-minded slay them enthusiasm”.

Look Wot You Dun

“Look Wot You Dun” is a single from glam rock band Slade which appeared on the album Sladest. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder, bassist Jim Lea and drummer Don Powell. The single was released just when Slade’s previous single Coz I Luv You had its last week in the top 100.[1] The single peaked at #4 in the UK, spending 10 weeks on the chart, last on the top 100 on 08/04/1972 at #38. The single originally entered the charts at #25 and climbed to #9 the following week and #4 after. It remained at #4 for 3 weeks. The previous single topped the UK charts.[2]

Lock Up Your Daughters (song)

“Lock Up Your Daughters” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the album Till Deaf Do Us Part. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in September 1981 and peaked at #29 in the UK, spending a total of 8 weeks on the chart.[1] The release was under RCA records which was Slade’s first major label in years since using their own label to release material.[2]

Little Sheila

“Little Sheila” is a song from rock band Slade which was released as the fourth and final single from the 1985 album Rogues Gallery. It was the leading American single from the album. The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. It was produced by John Punter.[1]

Released as the lead and sole American single from Rogues Gallery, the song did not have a UK release, and was only released in America, Canada and Germany. Slade had hoped the single would continue the band’s breakthrough success found with “Run Runaway” and “My Oh My”, both hit singles during 1984 in America. Upon release, the track received a good amount of radio play in the United States and Canada, whilst a level of interest from the public was shown for the band. However, like the Rogues Gallery album, the single received little support from CBS except for a music video.[2] The single peaked at #86 on the American Billboard Hot 100 during May 1985, and fared better on the American Mainstream Rock Chart, where it peaked at #13. It became Slade’s last charting single in the United States, and was also Slade’s second and last appearance on the Mainstream Rock Chart.[3] The single remains one of the more popular Slade tracks amongst Americans. In Canada the song was also Slade’s last charting single in the country, peaking at #50.[4] The song failed to chart in Germany.

In the Billboard Magazine issue of 27 April 1985, the song was first listed at #107 on the ‘Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles’, whilst the Rogues Gallery album was at #203 on the ‘Bubbling Under Top Pop Albums’.[5] The song, lasting three weeks in the Top 100 in America, debuted at #92.[6]

Although the track had a similar theme to the Van Halen sound of the time (notably the 1984 hit song “Jump”), the song itself dated from 1979, with a version recorded around 1980 by The Dummies, a band involving Jim Lea and his brother Frank Lea. This version was eventually released for the first time on the 1991 album A Day in the Life of the Dummies. The album summed up the band’s entire recording career, which largely consisted of new versions of Slade songs.[7]

Let’s Call It Quits (song)

“Let’s Call It Quits” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the album Nobody’s Fools.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1976 and like the previous single, it peaked at #11 in the UK, spending 7 weeks on the chart.[2]

The single was Slade’s last to chart in the top #20 region for five years.[3] Usual loyal countries such as Netherlands, Austria and Germany did not have the single enter the top 100, again like the previous single.[4] Slade’s popularity was further declining, particularly because the band were living and touring in America, trying to crack the market there.

For the September–December 1986 Slade fan club magazine, an interview with Jim Lea saw him recall the court case against “Let’s Call It Quits” where it was found the song had similarities to Allen Toussaint’s penned 1973 track “Brickyard Blues”. Lea stated “We had a court case taken against us once for ‘Let’s Call It Quits’ because it sounded like a song called ‘Brickyard Blues’, a song that I had never heard before or since. We settled it out of court and agreed to give them 50%.”

The track was performed by Frank Skinner on his TV show live during the 1990s. Noddy Holder and Katy Hill were backing vocalists.[5]

Chris Ingham of Rock Backpages wrote “Let’s Call It Quits proves that guitarist Dave Hill had the widest finger-driven vibrato in the history of rock guitar.”

Till Deaf Do Us Part

Till Deaf Do Us Part is the tenth album by the British rock group Slade. It was released on 13 November 1981 and reached number 68 on the UK charts.[1]

Although not as successful as We’ll Bring the House Down, this album sold well. The track “Lock Up Your Daughters” became a staple in Slade concerts. The album itself shown Slade with their heaviest sound. The album also was the only to feature organs throughout.

The album cover was later replaced by a group photo due to reported offence of the original although this has never been confirmed.[2]

Q Magazine listed the album at number 16 on the “20 Most Painfully Punning Album Titles of All Time.”[3]

In for a Penny

“In For a Penny” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the album Nobody’s Fools. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1975 and peaked at #11 in the UK, spending 8 weeks on the chart.[1] The track itself is notable for being the only track in Slade’s career to feature accordion, played by bassist and keyboardist Lea, though Holder mimed the part on a concertina when the band performed the song on TV.[2]

Record Mirror magazine voted the single #6 on the top 10 best singles in February 1976.[3]

The first 30,000 copies of the single had a picture sleeve.

How Does It Feel (Slade song)

“How Does It Feel” is a single from glam rock band Slade which appeared on the album Slade in Flame. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in early 1975. The single only peaked at #15 in the UK which was the lowest charting since Slade’s first charting single Get Down and Get With It in 1971. The first week in the top 100, the single only began at #38 which was poor for a Slade single.[1]

The first 200,000 copies of the single featured coloured sleeves whilst the remainder came in an ordinary vinyl sleeve.[2][3]

Hold Tight (Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich song)

Hold Tight! is the name of a pop/rock song by Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich. The song was recorded on 11 January 1966 at Fontana’s studios in Marble Arch, London and released as a single in February 1966 with the B-side You Know What I Want, and on 24 June 1966, on the band’s debut album.

The song reached number 4 on the UK Singles Chart.[1] This was their first top ten hit, also reaching number 27 on the Australian Singles Chart and number 8 on the NZ Singles Chart. The song did not chart on the US Hot 100, but then again, they saw limited success in the United States as even their top hit, Zabadak, which reached number 3 in the UK and number 4 in New Zealand, only reached number 52 on the US Hot 100.

The song was used in the soundtrack to the 2007 Quentin Tarantino film Death Proof, in which Jungle Julia (Sydney Tamiia Poitier) requests the song, calling in to the radio station for which she works.[2][3]

Gypsy Roadhog

“Gypsy Roadhog” is the lead single from the 1977 album Whatever Happened to Slade by rock band Slade. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1977 and peaked at #48 in the UK, spending only 2 weeks on the chart, the lowest number of weeks on the chart for Slade in the 1970s.[1]

The single was the first Slade single released on Barn Records.[2] Since 1970 to 1976, the band had been on the Polydor Records label.

The track is notable for a performance on the children’s Blue Peter show. The producers didn’t realise the track’s reference to drugs. Complaints rose after their performance which led to the record being banned by the BBC.[3]

In a 1989 interview on Sky by Day, Holder spoke of the song’s lyrics, stating “The song was all about a cocaine dealer in America but it was actually an anti-drug song.”[4]

The b-side “Forest Full of Needles” was originally exclusive to the single, eventually being released on CD via the 2007 compilation “B-Sides” and the remaster of Whatever Happened to Slade.

Subsequent to its original release, “Gypsy Roadhog” has appeared on “The Very Best of Slade” and “The Slade Box”. It was also used as a bonus track on the CD single of Slade’s last single release, 1991’s “Universe”.

Gudbuy T’Jane

“Gudbuy T’ Jane” is a hit single from glam rock band Slade released in 1972. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea and appeared on their album Slayed?. The single peaked at #2 in the UK, losing the number one spot to Chuck Berry’s single My Ding-A-Ling.[1] It did however, peak at #1 in the New Musical Express charts. Slade’s two previous singles had charted at #1 in the UK. The single lasted 13 weeks in the top 100. It stayed in the top 10 from the moment it was released for 8 weeks.[2] The single was also the most successful of Slade’s 1970’s singles in the United States, peaking at #68.[3]

The single peaked at #1 on the NME singles chart.

The single was awarded a UK Silver Disc in early 1973.[4][5]

In 1981, drummer Don Powell was asked in a fan club interview for his three favourite Slade songs. Powell stated “Far Far Away”, “Standin’ on the Corner” and “Gudbuy T’Jane” as his favourites.[6][7]

The track was used, in slightly speeded-up form, during BBC2 comedy show The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer to introduce the “Slade in Residence” (Series 1) and “Slade on Holiday” (Series 2) segments.[8]

Give Us a Goal

“Give Us a Goal” is a single from English rock band Slade.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1978 and failed to chart in the UK.[2] The single was based on football.

At the time Slade were still unpopular and were not having any commercial success. Holder suggested that the band write and release a football track to try to get some commercial success.[3]

The single was also promoted through UK TV, Slade appearing on shows such as Cheggers Plays Pop.[4]

The track was used in the TV ad for the popular football video game Fifa 09.[5] The track has since become increasingly popular, gathering approx 85,000 views on YouTube.[6]

English writer Chris Ingham described the track as “a fair effort at a rock ‘n’ roll football anthem although the b-side Daddio was a better bet all around.”[7]

The single was released on 12″ vinyl in Italy during 1978, being Slade’s only 12” single at that time.[8]

Ginny, Ginny

“Ginny, Ginny” is the first single of 1979 from rock band Slade which was the leading single from the album Return to Base…..[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was produced by Slade, with usual producer and managaer Chas Chandler allowing the band to produce themselves.

Much like the band’s releases around this time, the single did not enter the UK charts. Despite this, the single was confirmed to have entered the official UK top 200.

The song became part of the band’s UK live set around the time of release.

The b-side ‘Dizzy Mama’ was later used on the 1981 album We’ll Bring the House Down, as well as becoming part of Slade’s live set.

Get Down and Get with It

“Get Down and Get With It” is a single from rock band Slade which appeared on the compilation album Sladest. It was written by Bobby Marchan, who first recorded the song as “Get Down With It” in 1965. The single was released in 1971 and peaked at #16 in the UK, spending 14 weeks on the chart.[1] This was Slade’s first chart entry in their career.[2] Their next single “Coz I Luv You” would peak at #1.

Originally, both Slade manager/producer Chas Chandler and Slade had decided that in order to make a break into the charts they would need to capture their strong reputation as a live act onto record. They chose “Get Down and Get With It”, a kind of hybrid of a Little Richard song and a Bobby Marchan song, as the band would frequently play the song live and it was always a popular live number. The song was successfully captured in the studio, complete with foot-stomping and hand-clapping as intended, eventually breaking Slade into the UK chart as well as Europe.[3]

Far Far Away (song)

“Far Far Away” is a single from rock band Slade which was released in 1974 to promote the upcoming film titled Slade in Flame.[1] It appeared on the soundtrack album of the same name.[2] The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea and was originally titled “Letting Loose Around The World”.[3] It peaked at #2 in the UK, spending 6 weeks on the chart and 5 weeks in the top 10[4] and was certified UK Silver by BPI in November 1974.[5]

Everyday (Slade song)

“Everyday” is a single from glam rock band Slade that appeared on the album Old New Borrowed and Blue, and was written by the usual collaboration of lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1974 and peaked at number 3 in the UK, spending seven weeks on the chart, the shortest time of any charting Slade single at that time.[1] The single’s first week upon release peaked at number 6 and stayed in the top 10 for four weeks.[2] Everyday marked a change from Slade’s usual style. The public did not expect a ballad to be released[3] and – with the exception of “Far Far Away” – Slade would not reach higher than number 3 in the UK again until 1983’s “My Oh My”.[4]

The single was certified UK Silver by BPI in April 1974.[5]

The single was awarded a Silver Disc only three days after its release.[6][7]

The Record Mirror polls of early 1975 voted “Everyday” in the top ten singles poll.[8][9]

Do You Believe in Miracles

“Do You Believe in Miracles” is a UK and German only single from rock band Slade.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in 1985 and peaked at #54 in the UK, spending 6 weeks on the chart.[2] The single’s earning went to charity.[3]

The track was added to Slade’s Christmas Party album Crackers which was released on the same date as the single, 18 November.

Darlin’ Be Home Soon

“Darlin’ Be Home Soon” (or “Darling Be Home Soon”) is a song written by John Sebastian of The Lovin’ Spoonful for the soundtrack of the 1966 Francis Ford Coppola film You’re a Big Boy Now. It has been described as “…one of the most heartfelt songs about being away from a loved one, written from the point of view of a musician on the road writing a letter.”[1] It appeared on The Lovin’ Spoonful’s 1967 soundtrack album You’re a Big Boy Now and was released as a single, reaching #15 on the US pop charts. In the same year, a version by Bobby Darin reached #93 on the US charts, saxophonist Bud Shank put the track on his album A Spoonful of Jazz, and Billie Davis put it on the B-side of a single in the UK.

Sebastian performed his composition at Woodstock; it was the fourth song out of the five he performed at the 1969 music festival in White Lake, New York.

In 1969 “Darlin’ Be Home Soon” appeared on Joe Cocker’s Joe Cocker! album; it became a standard of Cocker’s, appearing on many compilations and “best of”s. The song was performed by Slade and appears on their successful 1972 live album Slade Alive!. In the same year The Association almost made the top 100 in the US with a single (#104) taken from Waterbeds in Trinidad!

The other charting versions of the song are by the Barra MacNeils (1993, #23 Canadian and on their album Closer to Paradise) and Let Loose (1996, #65 UK as a single, and on the album Rollercoaster).

Cum On Feel the Noize

“Cum On Feel the Noize” is a rock song originally released by Slade in 1973. Written by Jim Lea and Noddy Holder and produced by Chas Chandler, “Cum On Feel the Noize” was Slade’s fourth number-one single in the UK and their first to enter straight at number one. As a single from Slade, it was a follow-up to “Gudbuy T’ Jane”, a number-two hit in the UK.

The single’s B-side “I’m Mee, I’m Now, and That’s Orl” was voted no. 3 of the top three Slade B-sides in the Slade Fan Club Poll of 1979.[4][5]

The song was also a 1983 hit for heavy metal band Quiet Riot.

Coz I Luv You

“Coz I Luv You” is a song by British band Slade, written by Noddy Holder and Jim Lea and produced by Chas Chandler. It was the band’s second hit single in the UK and the first of six number ones. Released on 30 October 1971, it was last seen on the charts on 5 February 1972 at #44. According to Holder’s autobiography the single sold half a million copies in only two weeks.

The song was typical of Slade’s brash, stomping glam style and prominently featured Jim Lea’s electric violin. It quickly reached number one on the UK Singles Chart, where it stayed for four weeks in November 1971. In the first week of its release, the single reached #26, followed by #8 the following week and #1 the week after. The single was #1 for four weeks and stayed at #3 for three weeks after that.[1]

Burning in the Heat of Love

“Burning in the Heat of Love” is a non-album single from rock band Slade. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea.[1] The single was released via Barn Records on 7 April 1977 and failed to chart in the UK.

The single was released to commercial failure, failing to enter the top 100 within the UK, the second single to do this since the band’s rise to fame.[2] Like the previous single Gypsy Roadhog, the single was banned for the lyrical content, although this time instead of a drug reference, the lyric was particularly risqué.[3]

According to Record Mirror magazine, the single was released to tie-in with the band’s tour, beginning in May.[4]

“Burning in the Heat of Love” was produced by Chas Chandler as was the b-side “Ready Steady Kids”. The b-side was originally exclusive to the single, eventually being released on CD via the 2007 Salvo compilation “B-Sides” and the remaster of 1977 album “Whatever Happened to Slade”. The b-side was written about the American audiences that Slade had encountered during their attempt to crack the American market from 1975 until the very end of 1976.[5] The single was released on 7″ vinyl only.[6]

Although the UK sleeve had no artwork, separate artworks were each given to the Belgian, French, German and Italian releases.[6]

A live version of the song appeared on the band’s 1978 live album Slade Alive Vol. 2.[7]

You Boyz Make Big Noize (song)

You Boyz Make Big Noize is a UK-only single from the same year and after Slade’s 1987 album You Boyz Make Big Noize by rock band Slade.[1] It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. The single was released in August 1987 and peaked at #94 in the UK, spending only 1 week on the UK chart.[2]

Despite the poor charting in the UK, the single went straight to #6 in the Sounds Magazine Hot Metal 50 Chart.[3][4]

The track featured on the American album release of You Boyz Make Big Noize, replacing track 4 titled “Fools Go Crazy”.

All Join Hands

“All Join Hands” is a song by rock band Slade, released as the lead single from the 1985 album Rogues Gallery. The single was released in 1984 and became the band’s third UK hit that year, peaking at #15, and spending 10 weeks on the chart.[1] The single stayed in the top #30 for 7 weeks. The single was aimed at the Christmas market and had a similar power ballad to Slade’s previous 1983 hit My Oh My. It was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea.

It became Slade’s last top #20 hit although their 1991 single Radio Wall of Sound would peak at #21.[2] The photography of the cover was by Tony McConnell.

The b-side “Here’s To…” was originally an exclusive b-side before appearing as an album track on the 1985 album “Crackers – The Christmas Party Album”.

7 Year Bitch (song)

“7 Year Bitch” is a song from rock band Slade which was released as the second single from the 1985 album Rogues Gallery. The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. It was produced by John Punter.[1]

Following the Top 15 success of the band’s late 1984 single “All Join Hands”, the band’s first release of 1985 was “7 Year Bitch”. The single was virtually banned by the UK broadcasting media which in 1985 was at the height of a wave of political correctness. As a result, the band felt unfairly judged by the media, who observed that they would have got away with it if they’d called it “7 Year Itch” and that no one complained about Elton John’s The Bitch is Back which was a hit record in 1974. Later in 1998, Holder recalled of “7 Year Bitch’s” potential, “That was a hit record, but we got a bit of a backlash”.[2] “7 Year Bitch” peaked at #60 in the UK and spent 3 weeks in the Top 100.[3] Faring better in Germany, the song peaked at #39 and lasted on the singles chart for a total of eight weeks. It became Slade’s last single of new material to enter the German Singles Chart.[4]

In the September–December 1986 Slade International Fan Club Newsletter, the poll results were announced for the 1986 opinion poll based on Slade’s material. For the best b-side of the 80s, “Leave Them Girls Alone” placed at #1.[5]

Circa 1989, Lea revealed that he had done a re-worked version of “7 Year Bitch”, although his version has remained unreleased to date. In the Slade International Fan Club Newsletter of April–June 1990, the third part of a late 1989 Jim Lea interview was published, where he spoke of the re-worked version amongst other tracks. He stated “I’ve also done another version of “She Did It to Me” with an ex-singer from Uriah Heap, with an absolutely panoramic version, it’s great. I did a version of the old Johnny Kidd and the Pirates song “I’ll Never Get Over You”, you’d never know it was me though. I’ve also done “7 Year Bitch” but not like Slade’s version and there is also some stuff that you’ve never heard of, but I haven’t finished it yet. There is a track that I’ve written called “Radio Wall of Sound” and it sounds just like Slade, even my brother Frank says it sounds like Slade.”[6]

The song would later be covered by SAPO.[7]

(And Now the Waltz) C’est La Vie

“(And Now the Waltz) C’est La Vie” is a song from rock band Slade which was released as the lead single in late 1982, from the album The Amazing Kamikaze Syndrome, which would not be released until the end of 1983, along with its 1984 American counterpart Keep Your Hands Off My Power Supply. The song was written by lead singer Noddy Holder and bassist Jim Lea. It was produced solely by Lea.[1]

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