eurohitlist.eu

You Got the Silver

“You Got the Silver” is a song by English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from their 1969 album Let It Bleed. It was also released as the B-side to the “Let It Bleed” single in Japan.

Recorded on 18 February 1969, “You Got the Silver” is the first Stones song to feature guitarist Keith Richards on solo lead vocal throughout (Richards previously sang separate lead vocals on parts of “Something Happened to Me Yesterday” from Between the Buttons and “Salt of the Earth” from Beggars Banquet).[3] One of Richards’s own compositions, “You Got the Silver” is said to have been written about his then-girlfriend Anita Pallenberg.

“Hey babe, you got my soul, You got the silver, you got the gold

A flash of love has made me blind, I don’t care, no, that’s no big surprise”

“You Got the Silver” was the last Stones recording with Brian Jones to be released. He plays autoharp, one of his two appearances on the album. The band recorded a version of the song with Jagger on lead, but opted to use Richards’s version for the official release. The Jagger version has since become a well-known bootleg recording. Jones’s autoharp contribution can only be heard clearly on the alternate mix with Jagger on vocals and it is played only during the section of the verses where the drums join in. Wyman’s bass playing also stands out more in the unreleased alternate mix. The official/album mix has the autoharp either mixed very low or removed completely in favor of Nicky Hopkins’s organ and piano overdubs and adds a backwards echo effect applied to Richards’s slide guitar track.

The song was played live for the first time during the No Security Tour in 1999. It was brought out again by Richards for the 2005-2007 A Bigger Bang Tour. A November 1, 2006 live performance captured on the 2008 concert film Shine a Light is featured on the album of the same name. The song was also played during the Rolling Stones’ 50 and Counting tour, and a July 2013 performance appears on Hyde Park Live, featuring Ron Wood playing slide guitar. During live performances, the song is highly notable for being sung by Richards without playing guitar or any other instrument.

“You Got the Silver” was featured in the Michelangelo Antonioni film Zabriskie Point.

You Got Me Rocking

“You Got Me Rocking” is a song by the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones, on their 1994 album Voodoo Lounge. The song received remixes by Paul Oakenfold and Steve Osborne.

Begun in early in 1993, “You Got Me Rocking” was initially a blues number; bootlegs have Jagger and Richards working the song as a slower, blues flavored ramble, with Jagger shouting the hook- “you got me rocking”. Changed to a straightforward rocker in the vein of “Start Me Up”, the song quickly evolved into a powerful rock single as Richards made the transition from piano to guitar. The lyrics moved to a more upbeat tone, as singer Mick Jagger presents redemption from a series of career ending instances of various professionals:

“I was a hooker losing her looks; I was a writer can’t write another book;

I was all dried up dying to get wet; I was a tycoon drowning in debt.”

The lyrics can be interpreted as an answer to the Rolling Stones’ critics, who often deride the band for their advancing age. Recording on “You Got Me Rocking” lasted from mid-summer to early winter 1993, when final touches were put on. The song was released as a single in the UK in September 1994, where it reached number 23. It was also released as a single in the US but only reached a failing number 113 in 1995.

The B-side is the little-known “Jump on Top of Me” which also appears on the soundtrack to Prêt-à-Porter. “You Got Me Rocking” appeared on the soundtrack to The Replacements in 2000.

“You Got Me Rocking” is notable as it remains one of the Stones’ most enduring live songs, a rarity for a late album song. The song was performed some fifty times during the 2005–2006 A Bigger Bang Tour.

A recording from the 1997–1998 Bridges to Babylon Tour opened the 1998 live album No Security. It was also included on the Stones’ 2002 career retrospective, Forty Licks.

You Can’t Always Get What You Want

“You Can’t Always Get What You Want” is a song by the Rolling Stones on their 1969 album Let It Bleed. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it was named as the 100th greatest song of all time by Rolling Stone magazine in its 2004 list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.

Although it was the closing track, “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” was the first song recorded for the album. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” was recorded on 16 and 17 November 1968 at Olympic Sound Studios in London. It features the London Bach Choir opening the song (the choir opening is only on the album version), highlighting throughout, and bringing it to its conclusion. Jimmy Miller, the Stones’ producer at the time, plays drums on this song instead of Charlie Watts. Al Kooper plays piano and organ, as well as the French horn intro, while Rocky Dijon plays congas and maracas.[citation needed]

Of the song, Jagger said: “‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want’ was something I just played on the acoustic guitar—one of those bedroom songs. It proved to be quite difficult to record because Charlie couldn’t play the groove and so Jimmy Miller had to play the drums. I’d also had this idea of having a choir, probably a gospel choir, on the track, but there wasn’t one around at that point. Jack Nitzsche, or somebody, said that we could get the London Bach Choir and we said, ‘That will be a laugh.'”[1]

In his review of the song, Richie Unterberger of Allmusic said: “If you buy John Lennon’s observation that the Rolling Stones were apt to copy the Beatles’ innovations within a few months or so, ‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want’ is the Rolling Stones’ counterpart to ‘Hey Jude’.”[2] Jagger said in 1969, “I liked the way the Beatles did that with ‘Hey Jude’. The orchestra was not just to cover everything up—it was something extra. We may do something like that on the next album.”[3]

Yesterday’s Papers

Yesterday’s Papers is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1967 album, Between the Buttons. It was the first song that Mick Jagger wrote on his own for The Rolling Stones. It was the opening track on the UK version of that album and was included on the US version as the second track.

In the song, recorded in late 1966, Brian Jones’s vibraphone and Jack Nitzsche’s harpsichord are prominent: Keith Richards plays a distorted guitar with Charlie Watts on drums and Bill Wyman on bass. A bootleg recording exists of an alternate backing track that includes strings.

Whereas the stereo mix fades after one chorus, the mono mix continues for one more full chorus. Additionally, the mono version is at one point near the end missing some of the backing vocals heard on the stereo version.

The song is supposedly directed at Jagger’s ex-girlfriend Chrissie Shrimpton,[1][2] whose relationship with Jagger at the time turned sour. It is noted for suggesting a negative treatment of women, comparing “yesterday’s girl” to “yesterday’s papers”, as something that can be just thrown out. This is exacerbated by the fact that Shrimpton tried to commit suicide[3] over the breakup.

The song has been covered by Chris Farlowe.[4]

Winter (The Rolling Stones song)

“Winter” is a song by English rock and roll band the Rolling Stones featured on their 1973 album Goats Head Soup.

It bears many similarities to “Moonlight Mile” from their 1971 album Sticky Fingers. Credited to singer Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards, “Winter” is likely the work of Jagger and the Stones’ lead guitarist at the time, Mick Taylor. It was the first song recorded for the album and does not feature Richards at all. On the song, Bill Janovitz says in his review, “Here they were in sunny Jamaica, and the Stones were writing and recording an entirely convincing and evocative picture of a Northern Hemisphere winter. Perhaps they were so happy to be escaping the season they felt that starting the sessions with “Winter” could transition them out of the old and into the new climate. Though it bemoans many of the negatives of the season [in the] lyrics… “Winter” seems to simultaneously celebrate the season as something inherently beautiful, with other evocations of holiday scenes and wanting to wrap a coat and keep a lover warm.”[1]

“It sure been a hard, hard winter, My feet been draggin’ ‘cross the ground; And I hope it’s gonna be a long, hot summer; And the light of love will be burnin’ bright”

“And I wish I been out in California, When the lights on all the Christmas trees went out; But I been burnin’ my bell, book and candle, And the restoration plays have all gone ’round          ”

Recording began at Kingston’s Dynamic Sound Studios in November and continued into December 1972. Jagger opens the song with the rhythm guitar piece and is accompanied by Taylor’s “country-like licks”[1] on lead. Taylor also plays slide guitar. Nicky Hopkins performs the song’s accompanying piano while Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts perform bass and drums, respectively. The songs strings were arranged by Nicky Harrison.[2]

Despite his considerable contribution to the song, Taylor never received official credit from Jagger or Richards.

This song was featured in the series finale of the CBS drama Cold Case. In 2004 British actor Bill Nighy picked Winter as his favourite track on the BBC’s radio show Desert Island Discs.[3]

Wild Horses (The Rolling Stones song)

“Wild Horses” is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1971 album Sticky Fingers, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Rolling Stone ranked it at No. 334 in its “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” list in 2004.

In the liner notes to the 1993 Rolling Stones compilation album Jump Back, Jagger states, “I remember we sat around originally doing this with Gram Parsons, and I think his version came out slightly before ours. Everyone always says this was written about Marianne but I don’t think it was; that was all well over by then. But I was definitely very inside this piece emotionally.” Richards says, “If there is a classic way of Mick and me working together this is it. I had the riff and chorus line, Mick got stuck into the verses. Just like “Satisfaction”. “Wild Horses” was about the usual thing of not wanting to be on the road, being a million miles from where you want to be.”[1]

Originally recorded over a three-day period at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Alabama during 2–4 December 1969 while Albert and David Maysles were shooting for the film that was titled Gimme Shelter, the song was not released until over a year later due to legal wranglings with the band’s former label.[citation needed] Along with “Brown Sugar”, it is one of the two Rolling Stones compositions from Sticky Fingers (1971) over which ABKCO Records co-owns the rights along with the Stones. It features session player Jim Dickinson on piano, Richards on electric guitar and twelve-string acoustic guitar, and Mick Taylor on acoustic guitar. Taylor uses Nashville tuning, in which the EADG strings of the acoustic guitar are strung one octave higher than in standard tuning. Ian Stewart was present at the session, but refused to perform the piano part on the track due to the prevalence of minor chords, which he disliked playing.[2]

Wanna Hold You

“Wanna Hold You” is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones on their 1983 album Undercover.

Although credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Wanna Hold You” is largely a Richards composition. The song was written in a recording studio in Paris in the basement of a house of one of Richards’ acquaintances. Richards describes the song’s structure as being “very early sort of Lennon & McCartney, let alone the title, which suggest “I Want to Hold Your Hand”. The first recording of the song, of which Richards claims to have the original tape, had only Richards on guitar and vocals and Jagger on drums.[1]

The lyrics deal with the often-used topic of a poor man having nothing but love to give to a woman, as the following line illustrates:

“I hope you find it funny that I’ve got no money – but if you stick with me you’re going to get some love for free ”

During the Rolling Stones’ Bridges To Babylon Tour, “Wanna Hold You” was a regular part of the mini-set sung by Richards and was performed 99 times (of 107 concerts in total).[2]

Waiting on a Friend

“Waiting on a Friend” is a song by the Rolling Stones from their 1981 album Tattoo You. Released as the album’s second single, it reached #13 on the US singles chart.

Recording of “Waiting on a Friend” (as ‘Waiting for a Friend’) began in late 1972 through early 1973 in Kingston, Jamaica, during the Goats Head Soup sessions when the band still had Mick Taylor as a member. His guitar piece made it to the overdubbing sessions in April 1981 when the song was selected by Tattoo You producer Chris Kimsey as one the band could re-work for the album.

In the liner notes to 1993’s compilation album Jump Back, Mick Jagger said, “We all liked it at the time but it didn’t have any lyrics, so there we were… The lyric I added is very gentle and loving, about friendships in the band.” Jagger also had stated that the 1981 lyrics were contemplated for a future possible video, making the song the first Rolling Stones single to be packaged as a possible video for the emerging MTV channel.

The video, directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg (who also directed their 1968 special The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus), became very popular on MTV. Matching the song’s lyrics, Jagger is seen waiting for Keith Richards in the doorway of an apartment block. The building, at 96-98 St. Mark’s Place in Manhattan, is notable for appearing on the cover of Led Zeppelin’s 1975 album Physical Graffiti. The two then walk down the street and enter the St. Mark’s Bar & Grill where the other three band members are already drinking. Jagger sings the song to Richards and the video concludes with the band setting up for a gig at the back of the bar, ignored by the other patrons

The lyrics see a more mature side of singer Jagger represented. He speaks of setting aside women and vices in favor of making some sense of his life and finding the virtues inherent in true friendship:

“Don’t need a whore, I don’t need no booze, don’t need a virgin priest. But I need someone I can cry to, I need someone to protect.”

The song is noted for its dreamy qualities brought on by the soft guitars, smooth rhythm, and Jagger’s lilting refrain of “doo-doo-doo”‘s. Stones-recording veteran Nicky Hopkins performs the track’s running piano.[1] The Stones hired jazz saxophonist Sonny Rollins to perform the solo on this song, as well as two others on the album. On his addition to the track, Jagger said in 1985:
“I had a lot of trepidation about working with Sonny Rollins. This guy’s a giant of the saxophone. Charlie said, ‘He’s never going to want to play on a Rolling Stones record!’ I said, ‘Yes he is going to want to.’ And he did and he was wonderful. I said, ‘Would you like me to stay out there in the studio?’ He said, ‘Yeah, you tell me where you want me to play and DANCE the part out.’ So I did that. And that’s very important: communication in hand, dance, whatever. You don’t have to do a whole ballet, but sometimes that movement of the shoulder tells the guy to kick in on the beat.”[2]
Additional percussion, comprising claves, cabasa, güiro and conga, by Michael Carabello, was added during overdub sessions in April and June 1981.[3]

Torn and Frayed

“Torn and Frayed” is a song by the Rolling Stones featured on their 1972 album Exile on Main St.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Torn and Frayed” is called “a twangy, three-chord honky tonk, but not typically country… the progression of the chords brings gospel music to mind”,[1] by Bill Janovitz in his review of the song. The song comes from side two of Exile, the side known for its acoustic folk and country tunes. Janovitz continues, “The music comes as close to definitive country-rock or Stax-like country-soul as anything from the era, barring Gram Parsons — an immediate influence on the Stones.” Gram Parsons was present for the recording sessions of Exile at Nellcôte, and “Torn and Frayed” is perhaps the most overtly Parsons-influenced cut the Stones ever recorded, with a country-soul flavour reminiscent of the Parsons-fronted Flying Burrito Brothers’ 1969 debut album The Gilded Palace of Sin.

In fact, Al Perkins, a good friend and collaborator of Parsons’, appears on the track and performs the song’s pedal steel guitar. Jagger performs lead vocals and is accompanied by Richards on backing. Richards provides the song’s base of acoustic guitar and electric Telecaster. Mick Taylor bass and Charlie Watts performs drums. Organ is performed by Jim Price and piano is played by Nicky Hopkins.[2] Recording took place at Los Angeles’ Sunset Sound Studios between the months of December 1971 and March 1972.

Janovitz says of the lyrics, “‘Torn and Frayed’ follow a vagabond-like guitar player whose ‘coat is torn and frayed…'”

“ Well the ballrooms and smelly bordellos, and dressing rooms filled with parasites

On stage the band has got problems, they’re a bag of nerves on first nights

He ain’t tied down to no home town, yeah, and he thought he was reckless

You think he’s bad, he thinks you’re mad, yeah, and the guitar player gets restless.”

“Torn and Frayed” was performed by the Stones during the 1972 tour of America and was reintroduced to setlists during the 2002 leg of the Licks Tour. In 2009, it was covered by The Black Crowes on Warpaint Live. The song was also covered by Phish during their cover of Exile on Main St. on 31 October 2009. The song later appeared in another of their live shows in Cincinnati on 21 November 2009, as well as during their Superball IX festival in 2011 and at a live show in Pittsburgh on 23 June 2012.

Too Much Blood

“Too Much Blood” is a song by The Rolling Stones featured on their 1983 album Undercover.

Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Too Much Blood” is largely a Jagger composition. The song is a reflection of the many influences the Stones would have during their career in the mid-1980s. Jagger said at the time of its release, “I had made out a very honest burden of mind before everyone had arrived one night. It was just Charlie [Watts] and Bill [Wyman]. And one of our roadies called Jim Barber, he was playing guitar on it too. And I just started playing this riff I had, with this middle part, I didn’t have any words to it and then I just suddenly started rapping out these words which are the ones you hear.” (“Mick asked me if I could do an ‘Andy Summers’ on the track” – Jim Barber)[1]

The song itself deals with the growing depictions of violence in the media at the time and the case of Issei Sagawa, with Jagger saying, “Well there was this scandalous, murderous story in France – it was a true story – about this Japanese guy who murdered this girl and it sort of captured the imagination of the French public, and the Japanese. The Russians wanted to make a movie out of it. So that was the first bit and then I started becoming more light-hearted about it, movies and all. …it came out as a sort of anti-gratuitous cinema of violence. And it’s a kind of anti-violent thing.”[1]

“Did you ever see “The Texas Chain Saw Massacre”? Horrible, wasn’t it. You know, people ask me “is it really true where you live in Texas, is that really true what they do around there, people?” I say, “yea, every time I drive through the crossroads I get scared, there’s a bloke running round with a fucking chain saw. Oh! Oh! oh No, he’s gonna cut off, Oh no. Don’t saw off me leg, don’t saw off me arm.”

Jagger uses a half-hearted rap delivery for some lines, saying at the time, “I’m not a great rapper… It’s just made up on the spot as well. It’s completely extemporized, as well, most of it. A couple words I cleaned up. I don’t mean clean up, just made better sounds. That was just rap off the top of my head. I didn’t write it down, even.”[1]

Recording took place at Paris’ Pathé Marconi Studios and New York City’s Hit Factory between November and December 1982, with final touch-ups in August 1983. With Jagger on lead vocals, he also performs electric guitars with Barber and Wood. Horns are provided by Chops and percussion by Sly Dunbar.

A dance version of “Too Much Blood,” remixed by Arthur Baker, was released as a twelve-inch single on December 1984. A music video, directed by Julien Temple, was produced in support showing the band performing the song as well as Richards and guitarist Ron Wood chasing Jagger with chainsaws. The trio also appear, without chainsaws but still in character, on the record sleeve for the single. The video opens with an excerpt from the first movement of the String Quartet Number 3 by Béla Bartók. “Too Much Blood” has never been performed live by the Stones and appears on no compilations albums.

Time Waits for No One (song)

“Time Waits for No One” is a song by British rock and roll band the Rolling Stones from its 1974 album It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll. It was the first song recorded for the album.

Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Time Waits for No One” is a slower, smoother song than the ones for which the Stones are best known. The song features a distinctive groove that has been compared to the later (though earlier recorded) track “Waiting on a Friend”. It is also noted for its distinct Latin influences. The song opens with a riff by Richards which echoes throughout the rest of the song. Drummer Charlie Watts and Bill Wyman keep affected jazz beats. Song contributor Ray Cooper provides the song’s distinctive driving percussions, including tambourine, maracas and a knocking beat that carries through the entire song like the sound of a ticking clock. Wyman also contributes an early use of synthesizer on a Stones track. Stones recording veteran Nicky Hopkins provides the song’s swirling piano runs.

The song’s most noteworthy elements, however, are Mick Taylor’s extended guitar solo and Jagger’s lyrics. Taylor credits inspiration for the solo to a visit to Brazil following the Stones’ European Tour 1973. Taylor’s solo guitar piece carries the song to its notable conclusion.

Jagger’s lyrics are a pastiche of complex observations and reflections. He speaks in the voice of a person learning the true meaning of life, that, as the title suggests, time waits for no one;

“Yes, star crossed in pleasure the stream flows on by; Yes, as we’re sated in leisure, we watch it fly”

“Drink in your summer, gather your corn; The dreams of the night time will vanish by dawn”

“Time Waits for No One” has additional importance as it is seen as one of the final strains between the original Rolling Stones members and Mick Taylor. Prior to this time, Taylor had added his own riffs and flourishes to songs by Jagger and Richards, as did all the band members. However, after the song was written, Taylor asserts that his contribution to it was of main significance. As co-writer with Mick Jagger (during a period when Keith Richards was frequently absent) Taylor mentions that he had Jagger’s assurance that he would receive songwriting credit (as well as for “Till the Next Goodbye”) alongside usual credited composers Jagger and Richards, but he did not. His assurance had been such that he had mentioned it in an interview, prior to the album release with the recording, and was chagrined to find from the interviewer that no songs had credited him.[citation needed] It was this snub, along with the decision by the other Stones to head to Munich and begin recording the next album instead of touring in support of It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll, that was a major reason for Taylor’s abrupt (and unexpected) resignation from the band.[citation needed]

Allmusic critic Stephen Thomas Erlewine described “Time Waits for No One” as having “aching beauty”.[1] The song, though well regarded among the Stones’ canon of work, has never been performed live and has only appeared on one compilation album, 1981’s Sucking in the Seventies. This is a truncated version, with a running time some two minutes shorter than the original, with Taylor’s solo faded out early. The track is also available on the compilation album Time Waits for No One: Anthology 1971–1977, issued in 1979. This was available on vinyl only (CDC59107) and has never been released on CD.

The Rolling Stones’ song has certain affinity to the 1967 recording of the same name by the Lords of London. The Knack, a relatively unknown LA based band, had issued a different song by that name on the B-side of their debut single in 1967. “Time waits for no one” is also a lyric from the Moody Blues song “Driftwood”. The phrase “Time Waits For No Man” – a variant that also appears in Jagger’s lyrics – is used on John Mayall’s Bare Wires album of 1968 (in the I Know Now part of the Bare Wires suite) to which Mick Taylor contributed both as guitar player and as composer.

Till the Next Goodbye

“Till the Next Goodbye” is a song by The Rolling Stones, featured on its 1974 album It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll.

Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards recording on “Till the Next Goodbye” began at Munich’s Musicland Studios in November 1973. The song is a traditional ballad from the Stones’ middle period, with slight country music influences. It opens with an acoustic guitar which leads into Jagger’s performance. The lyrics deal with the “illicit meetings between two lovers”;

“Honey, is there any place that you would like to eat? I know a coffee shop down on 52nd Street; And I don’t need no fancy food and I don’t need no fancy wine; And I sure don’t need the tears you cry ”

The song’s chorus is notable as the title is elongated into the phrase “Till the next time we say goodbye.”

“Yeah, a movie house on 42nd Street, Ain’t a very likely place for you and I to meet; Watching the snow swirl around your hair and around your feet; And I’m thinking to myself ‘she surely looks a treat’ ”

In his review of the song, Bill Janovitz says, “In the mid-’70s, a 42nd Street movie theater would have been a place of questionable repute and not a very romantic rendezvous. The lyric is unexpectedly complex; the point of view, Jagger as narrator, speaks to the mistress apologetically and with a guilty conscience… In one line on the bridge, Jagger manages to convey empathy, culpability, and frustration: ‘I can’t go on like this/Can you? Can you?’ On paper it seems clear, the narrator is asking out of the relationship (paraphrasing): ‘I can’t do this, can you?’ But the way Jagger sings it, it sounds like he’s asking, ‘You can’t do this anymore, can you?’ He’s conveying a different meaning altogether, almost as if he is playing both parts in one line.”[1]

Recording continued at Jagger’s home in Newbury with the use of the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio and finished at Island Recording Studios in London. Jagger, Richards and Mick Taylor each perform acoustic guitar for the piece. Taylor also contributes electric slide guitar to the recording. Nicky Hopkins performs the song’s piano. Bill Wyman performs bass while Charlie Watts performs drums.[2]

An overlooked song from the Stones canon of work, “Till the Next Goodbye” has never been performed live by the Stones and is not included on any compilation albums.

The song was rehearsed on February 11, 2014, in Paris in preparation for the Rolling Stones “14 On Fire” Asia Pacific Tour, which started in Abu Dhabi on February 21, 2014. In attendance was special guest Mick Taylor.

The Spider and the Fly (song)

“The Spider and the Fly” is a song by British rock and roll band The Rolling Stones first released on the US version of their 1965 album Out of Our Heads. In the UK it was released as the B-side to “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”.

The song was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, presumably influenced by Mary Howitt’s 1829 poem of the same name. One of their earliest attempts at country music, this laid-back country-blues number[1] was cut by the band during their first tour of the US at Chicago’s Chess Records.

The lyrics speak of the search for women on a night out:

Sittin’ thinkin’ sinkin’ drinkin’

Wondering what I’d do when I’m through tonight

Smokin’, mopin’, maybe just hopin’

Some little girl will pass on by

By the end of the song, one is left wondering which person is the spider and which is the fly.

Singer Mick Jagger said in a 1995 interview with Rolling Stone, “I wasn’t really that mad about it, but when you listen to it on record, it still holds up quite interestingly as a blues song. It’s a Jimmy Reed blues with British pop-group words, which is an interesting combination: a song somewhat stuck in a time warp.” [2]

Of particular note is the early use of the Rolling Stones’ “ancient form of weaving” by guitarists Keith Richards and Brian Jones. Jagger performs harmonica on the recording while Jack Nitzsche provides percussion and keyboards.

The Stones have performed “The Spider and the Fly” twice on tour, in both 1965 and 1966 and during their 1995 leg of the Voodoo Lounge Tour. A studio “reworking” of the song was included on their 1995 live album Stripped and features the notable and amusing switch of the female subject of the song’s age from thirty to fifty – a nod at the Stones’ own advancing ages.

In 1996, the song was recorded by blues-rock guitarist Kenny Wayne Shepherd (with featured harmonica playing by veteran bluesman James Cotton), and included in the soundtrack for the movie, “Michael”, which starred John Travolta & Andie MacDowell. It has also been recorded by blues artist John Hammond on his 2003 album Ready For Love and Roland Van Campenhout on his 2003 album Lime & Coconut.

The Last Time (The Rolling Stones song)

“The Last Time” is a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones,[1] and the band’s first single written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.[1] Recorded at RCA Studios in Hollywood, California in January 1965, “The Last Time” was the band’s third UK single to reach No. 1 in the UK Singles Chart, spending three weeks at the top in March and early April 1965.[2] It reached No.2 in the Irish Singles Chart in March 1965.

Although The Last Time is credited to Jagger/Richards, the song’s refrain is very close to “This May Be The Last Time”, a 1958 track by The Staple Singers. In 2003, Richards acknowledged this,[3] saying: “we came up with ‘The Last Time’, which was basically re-adapting a traditional gospel song that had been sung by the Staple Singers, but luckily the song itself goes back into the mists of time.”[4][5] The Rolling Stones’ song has a main melody and a hook (a distinctive guitar riff) that were both absent in the Staple Singers’ version. Phil Spector assisted with the production. You can hear his “Wall of Sound” approach on the recording. [6]

Footage still exists of a number of performances of this song by the Rolling Stones in 1965: from the popular BBC-TV music show Top of the Pops, the 1965 New Musical Express Poll Winners Concert and American TV shows including The Ed Sullivan Show, Shindig! and The Hollywood Palace. A full live performance is also prominently featured in the 2012 re-edit of the 1965 documentary Charlie Is My Darling. The footage confirms that the rhythm chords and guitar solo were played by Keith Richards, while the song’s distinctive hook was played by Brian Jones, suggesting that Jones may have composed that riff.

A popular song in the Stones’ canon, it was regularly performed in concert during the band’s 1965, 1966 and 1967 tours. It was then left off their concert set lists until 1997-98, when it reappeared on the Bridges to Babylon Tour. It would later appear on some of the band’s setlists in 2012-13 on the 50 & Counting tour.

Tell Me (The Rolling Stones song)

“Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)” is a song by English rock band The Rolling Stones, featured on their 1964 self-titled album (later referred to as England’s Newest Hit Makers in the US). It was later released as single A-side in the US only, becoming the first Jagger/Richards song that the band released as a single A-side, and their first record to enter the US Top 40. The single reached #24 in the US and #1 in Sweden. It was not released as a single in the UK.

Sympathy for the Devil

“Sympathy for the Devil” is a song by The Rolling Stones, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and credited to Jagger/Richards. Sung by Jagger, the song is an ironic homage to the Devil, written in the first-person narrative from his point of view, recounting atrocities committed throughout the history of humanity. It is performed in a rock arrangement with a samba rhythm. It first appeared as the opening track on their 1968 album Beggars Banquet. Rolling Stone magazine placed it at No. 32 in their list of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Sweet Virginia

“Sweet Virginia” is the sixth track on the Rolling Stones’ 1972 double album Exile On Main St.. It was also released as the b-side of the “Rocks Off” single in Japan.

Recorded between 1971 and ’72, “Sweet Virginia” is a slow country inspired song, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. The song features a harmonica solo by Jagger, a saxophone solo by Bobby Keys. Charlie Watts plays a country shuffle rhythm.[1]

After the release of Exile on Main St., Allen Klein sued the Rolling Stones for breach of settlement because “Sweet Virginia” and four other songs on the album were composed while Jagger and Richards were under contract with his company, ABKCO. ABKCO acquired publishing rights to the songs, giving it a share of the royalties from Exile on Main St., and was able to publish another album of previously released Rolling Stones songs, More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies).[2]

The song was performed by the Stones during their 1972 American tour, their 1994 Voodoo Lounge Tour and their 2005 A Bigger Bang Tour. “Sweet Virginia” has also been covered by the band Phish[3] and Old Crow Medicine Show in concerts.

It was also recorded by Ronnie Lane.

The song was used in the 1995 film Casino starring Robert De Niro.

Sweet Black Angel

“Sweet Black Angel” (sometimes known as “Black Angel”) is a song by The Rolling Stones, featured on their 1972 album Exile on Main St. It was also released on a single as the B-side to “Tumbling Dice” prior to the album.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Sweet Black Angel” is one of the few outright political songs written by the Rolling Stones. A country-blues ballad, it was written about civil rights activist Angela Davis, who was facing murder charges at the time.[1] Steve Kurutz says in his review, “Having never heard of Angela Davis, a listener could easily overlook the political lyrics and get lost in the circular acoustic plucking or the washboard rhythm that propels the song so well. Yet, by knowing the case history one realizes how deft and clever Mick’s lyrics could be, even if he hides behind his best backwoods diction and garbled annunciation [sic] obscure[s] the point. ”

“Well de gal in danger, de gal in chains, but she keep on pushin’, would you do the same? She countin’ up de minutes, she countin’ up de days. She’s a sweet black angel, not a gun toting teacher, not a Red lovin’ school marm; ain’t someone gonna free her, free de sweet black slave, free de sweet black slave”

Initial recording took place at Mick Jagger’s “Stargroves” home in England during the mid 1970 Sticky Fingers sessions with overdubs and final mixing being completed later at Sunset Sound Studios in Los Angeles between December 1971 and March 1972. Jagger is on lead vocals and harmonica, Richards and Mick Taylor on guitars and backing vocals, Bill Wyman on bass and Charlie Watts on drums. Richard “Didymus” Washington plays marimba while producer Jimmy Miller lends support on percussion.[2]

“Sweet Black Angel” was performed live by the Stones only once, in Fort Worth on 24 June 1972.[3]

Sway (The Rolling Stones song)

“Sway” is a song by English rock ‘n roll band The Rolling Stones from their 1971 album Sticky Fingers. It was also released as the b-side of the “Wild Horses” single in June 1971. This single was released in the US only. Initial pressings of the single contain an alternate take; later pressings include the album version instead.

Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Sway” is a slower blues song and was the first song recorded by the band at Stargroves.

“Ain’t flinging tears out on the dusty ground for my friends out on the burial ground. Can’t stand the feeling getting so brought down. It’s just that demon life has got me in its sway.”

The song features a bottleneck slide guitar solo during the bridge and a dramatic, virtuoso outro solo (both performed by Mick Taylor). Rhythm guitar performed by Jagger was his first electric guitar performance on an album. The strings on the piece were arranged by Paul Buckmaster, who also worked on other songs from Sticky Fingers. Richards added his backing vocals but provided no guitar to the track. Pete Townshend, Billy Nichols and Ronnie Lane are believed to contribute backing vocals as well.

It was performed live for the first time in Columbus, Ohio, and then at many of the shows on the band’s A Bigger Bang Tour in 2006.

A seven-minute version of “Sway” appears on the Carla Olson/Mick Taylor Live at the Roxy album aka Too Hot for Snakes. Taylor gets to stretch out and solo whereas the Stones version faded at just under four minutes. (Ian McLagan plays piano on this version).

During the Stones’ “50 & Counting” concert tour in 2013, the band, accompanied by their guest Mick Taylor, played “Sway” during concerts at Los Angeles, Chicago and Boston. These concerts marked the first time that Taylor played on “Sway” at a Stones concert.

Stray Cat Blues

“Stray Cat Blues” is the eighth song on the Rolling Stones’ album Beggars Banquet. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and produced by Jimmy Miller. Miller’s production of the song is very representative of his style, featuring a very prominent hi hat beat, droning piano performed by Nicky Hopkins, a mellotron performed by Brian Jones, all electric guitars (including slide) performed by Richards and vocals from Jagger kept even in the mix. According to Mick Jagger [1] the song was inspired by “Heroin” by the Velvet Underground. The intro of Stray Cat and Heroin are similar.

The song is told from the perspective of a man lusting after having sex with a 15-year-old groupie, reasoning that “it’s no hanging matter, it’s no capital crime.”

A live performance was captured during the Rolling Stones’ American Tour 1969 and released on the 1970 live album Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! but, unlike the studio version, it is very slow and mellow sounding. Additionally, the lyrics are more provocative as the girl’s age was changed to 13.[citation needed]

Nitzer Ebb covered this song on the “I Give To You” single in 1991. Johnny Winter covered this song in 1974. A version of the song also appeared on Soundgarden’s 1992 EP Satanoscillatemymetallicsonatas and as a B-side on the single for their song “Jesus Christ Pose”.[2][3]

The song appears in ‘the video game Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock and in the film Joy.

Stoned (The Rolling Stones song)

“Stoned” was released in the UK by The Rolling Stones on the Decca label on 1 November 1963, as the B-side to their version of “I Wanna Be Your Man”.[1] Recorded in early October 1963, it was the first song released to be credited to “Nanker Phelge”, and the band’s first original composition. Derivative of “Green Onions” by Booker T. & the M.G.s, this bluesy instrumental was not released in the United States on “moral grounds”[2] until its inclusion on Singles Collection: The London Years in 1989.[3] It also appeared on the 1973 UK-only compilation No Stone Unturned, and on Singles 1963-1965 (2004).[1]

Star Star

“Star Star” is a song by The Rolling Stones that appeared on their 1973 album Goats Head Soup. In some European countries, including France and Germany, it was released as a single backed with “Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker).” One of the raunchiest songs in the band’s catalogue, the song was originally titled “Starfucker” until Atlantic Records owner Ahmet Ertegün (Atlantic was the distributor of Rolling Stones Records) insisted on the change.

The song gained notoriety not only for explicit lyrics alluding to sex acts involving fruit (among other things) but also for controversial mentions of such celebrities as John Wayne and Steve McQueen. It was released about nine months after Carly Simon’s affair with Jagger and the release of the song, “You’re So Vain”. Simon, who was by now married to fellow singer-songwriter James Taylor, had moved to Hollywood, which is mentioned in the lyrics of Star Star. While discussing the song, the band members have always referred to the song by its original title. A live performance was captured and released on 1977’s Love You Live. (Atlantic also tinkered with the mix, drowning a few key words with studio trickery, on all pressings except the very first promo copies.)

Some Girls (The Rolling Stones song)

“Some Girls” is the title track of English rock and roll band the Rolling Stone’s 1978 album Some Girls. It marked the third time a song on one of the band’s albums also served as the album’s title and is noted for its risque lyrics concerning the title’s “some girls”.

Alongside previous Stones releases that courted controversy (“Under My Thumb”, “Brown Sugar”, “Star Star”) due to their apparently degrading lyrics towards women, “Some Girls” caused a ruckus among both feminists and civil rights activists over such lyrics as “black girls just want to get fucked all night” and “Chinese girls are so gentle/They’re really such a tease”. Mick Jagger and the band defended the song, saying the lyrics mocked actual stereotypical feelings towards women. Saturday Night Live cast member Garrett Morris commented on the controversy with a mock-editorial on the show’s Weekend Update segment: After giving the impression that he was going to openly criticize the Stones, he quoted a sanitized version of the “Black girls just…” line, then stated “I have one thing to say to you, Mr. Mick Jagger… where are these women?!?”

The song is demonstrative of the unconventional uses of steel guitars heard throughout the Some Girls album, with an unusual, droning, phased two-chord groove that’s among the Stones’ most unusual arrangements. The original cut of the song ran some 23 minutes and featured verses Jagger came up with as they went along. Harmonica player Sugar Blue provides some virtuosic blues-style solos on the track.

The song was featured heavily on the Stones’ 1999 North American No Security Tour which concentrated on lesser-known songs from the band’s catalogue.

A performance during the band’s 2006 leg of the A Bigger Bang Tour was captured for the 2008 concert film Shine a Light and the accompanying live album.

Some Girls (The Rolling Stones song)

“Some Girls” is the title track of English rock and roll band the Rolling Stone’s 1978 album Some Girls. It marked the third time a song on one of the band’s albums also served as the album’s title and is noted for its risque lyrics concerning the title’s “some girls”.

Alongside previous Stones releases that courted controversy (“Under My Thumb”, “Brown Sugar”, “Star Star”) due to their apparently degrading lyrics towards women, “Some Girls” caused a ruckus among both feminists and civil rights activists over such lyrics as “black girls just want to get fucked all night” and “Chinese girls are so gentle/They’re really such a tease”. Mick Jagger and the band defended the song, saying the lyrics mocked actual stereotypical feelings towards women. Saturday Night Live cast member Garrett Morris commented on the controversy with a mock-editorial on the show’s Weekend Update segment: After giving the impression that he was going to openly criticize the Stones, he quoted a sanitized version of the “Black girls just…” line, then stated “I have one thing to say to you, Mr. Mick Jagger… where are these women?!?”

The song is demonstrative of the unconventional uses of steel guitars heard throughout the Some Girls album, with an unusual, droning, phased two-chord groove that’s among the Stones’ most unusual arrangements. The original cut of the song ran some 23 minutes and featured verses Jagger came up with as they went along. Harmonica player Sugar Blue provides some virtuosic blues-style solos on the track.

The song was featured heavily on the Stones’ 1999 North American No Security Tour which concentrated on lesser-known songs from the band’s catalogue.

A performance during the band’s 2006 leg of the A Bigger Bang Tour was captured for the 2008 concert film Shine a Light and the accompanying live album.

Slipping Away (The Rolling Stones song)

“Slipping Away” is a song by the Rolling Stones featured on their 1989 album Steel Wheels. It is sung by guitarist Keith Richards.

Credited to Richards and Mick Jagger, “Slipping Away” is a slow ballad, a form of music Richards would embrace on the Stones’ later albums. It was recorded at Montserrat’s Air Studios between March and June 1989.

With Richards singing, he and Ron Wood perform the song’s electric guitars. Bill Wyman provides the prominent bass while Charlie Watts performs drums. The organ and piano are performed by Chuck Leavell and electric piano by Matt Clifford. The song’s brass is provided by the Kick Horns. Backing vocals are performed by Richards, Jagger, Bernard Fowler, Sarah Dash, and Lisa Fischer.[1]

Richards recorded a re-worked acoustic version for the 1995 live album Stripped. Of the song he said at the time, “(When we recorded it for Stripped) we realized, ‘Wow, that song kind of slipped away.’ It just kind of tailed off at the end of Steel Wheels. We realized what potential it still had, and the band and especially the horn guys said, ‘You’ve got to do that!’ So in a way, I agreed to do it at gun point. But when I got into it, I really liked singing that song. It’s got some depth.”[1]

The Stones have since performed “Slipping Away” during the 1995 leg of the Voodoo Lounge Tour, the 2002-2003 Licks Tour throughout the 2005-2007 A Bigger Bang Tour, and on the 14 On Fire tour with former guitarist Mick Taylor guesting.[1]

Slave (song)

“Slave” is a song by The Rolling Stones on their 1981 album Tattoo You.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Slave” was originally recorded in Rotterdam, Netherlands, using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio in late January or early February 1975. During that time, the Rolling Stones were faced with the unexpected challenge of filling the recently vacated position of second guitarist, after the abrupt departure of Mick Taylor. The track features Billy Preston on electric piano and organ (although the organ could also have been played by Ian Stewart). The Who’s Pete Townshend provided backing vocals for the recording and one of saxophonist Sonny Rollins’ three performances on tracks for the album appeared as well. Percussion by Ollie E. Brown was recorded in 1975, with Mike Carabello adding conga during the 1981 overdub sessions. [1]

Called “…a standard Stones blues jam” in the album review by Rolling Stone, “Slave” was the result of the Stones’ experiments with funk and dance music during the Black and Blue recording sessions of 1974/75. The lyrics are sparse outside of a brief spoken verse by Jagger and the refrain of “Don’t want to be your slave”. Keith Richards provide the electric guitar part for the song, with Charlie Watts and Bill Wyman supporting on drums and bass, respectively.

The Virgin Records reissue of “Slave” contains an additional 90 seconds of the song. It was never performed by the Stones on stage and appears on no compilation albums.

Silver Train (song)

“Silver Train” is a song by the rock and roll band The Rolling Stones, from their 1973 album, Goats Head Soup.[1] The lyrics deal with the singer’s relationship with a prostitute.[2] Recording of the song had already begun in 1970 during sessions for Sticky Fingers. It also was the B-Side to the single “Angie”, which went to No. 1 in the US and top 5 in the UK.

Rolling Stone critic Bud Scoppa had this to say of the song:

“Side two begins modestly with “Silver Train,” a rock & roll song with a pre-rock flavor. The Stones’ approach is like their treatment of “Stop Breaking Down,” one of Exile’s sleepers: lots of whiny slide guitar and harp. They also emphasize, with their ragged ensemble shouts, the song’s appealing chorus. “Train” is the best of the album’s secondary songs.[3]”

Johnny Winter had heard a demo of the tune and recorded a cover of it for his album Still Alive and Well in 1973 (Columbia Records). Song written for Johnny Winter by Mick Jagger & Keith Richards. His album’s version was released even before Goats Head Soup.[2] The Black Crowes have also covered the song live.[4] Silver Train also appears on the Carla Olson / Mick Taylor “Too Hot For Snakes” album first released in 1991 and reissued autumn of 2012.

The song was played 4 times in 1973 and wasn’t played again until 2014 in Tokyo and Brisbane on the 14 On Fire tour with Mick Taylor, who played on it originally, as a special guest.[5]

Shine a Light (The Rolling Stones song)

“Shine a Light” is a song featured on British rock and roll band the Rolling Stones’ 1972 album Exile on Main St.

Although credited to usual Stones writers Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Shine a Light” was largely a Jagger composition. He began writing the song in early 1968 when the Stones still had guitarist Brian Jones as a member. The song was originally titled “Get a Line on You” and dealt with Jones’ ever-worsening addiction to drugs and his detachment from the rest of the band:

Saw you stretched out, in-a-room ten oh nine; A smile on your face, and tear in your eye; Could not seem to get a line on you; I could not seem to get a line on you; Oh sweet, sweet honey lover. Your Berber jewelry is jangling down the street; Smile on your face for every high school girl that you meet; I could not seem to get a line on you; Could not seem to get-a high on you; My, my sweet, sweet honey lover, now, oh’

A version of the song, under the title “Get a Line on You”, was made by Leon Russell at Olympic Studios in October 1969 with assistance from Jagger (lead vocals), Charlie Watts (drums), Leon Russell (piano), and probably also Bill Wyman (bass) and Mick Taylor (guitar). The recording was made during the recording sessions for the album Leon Russell (released 1970), where both Watts and Wyman contributed drums and bass to some of the tracks. However, the song “Get a Line on You” was not on the released album, but was shelved until 1993, when it finally surfaced as a bonus track on the 24K gold re-release by DCC Compact Classics (DCC Compact Classics GZS 1049).[1]

After Jones’ death in 1969, “Get a Line on You” resurfaced and was re-written by Jagger and recorded again in July 1970 now titled, “Shine A Light” and with slightly altered lyrics. A third recording at London’s Olympic Sound Studios in December 1971 resulted in final (Exile On Main Street) version of the song.

Saw you stretched out in Room Ten O Nine; With a smile on your face and a tear right in your eye; Oh, couldn’t see to get a line on you, my sweet honey love. Berber jewelry jangling down the street; Making bloodshot eyes at every woman that you meet; Could not seem to get a high on you, my sweet honey love’

This final version featured Jagger on vocals, Stones producer Jimmy Miller on drums instead of Watts, and Taylor on electric guitar. According to Wyman, he played bass on the song and Taylor was erroneously credited with playing bass, having pointed out the error via an advance copy of the album. He also says that he played bass on more tracks than was verified in the album’s credits and that Jagger had gotten the credits wrong.[2] Also performing on the song are back-up singers Clydie King, Joe Green, Venetta Fields, and Jesse Kirkland. Billy Preston performs both piano and organ for the recording and had a distinct influence on Jagger and the song while mixing the album at Los Angeles’ Sunset Sound Studios. Jagger claims visits to Preston’s local church inspired the gospel influences apparent on the final recording while Richards was absent from these sessions.

After the release of Exile on Main St., Allen Klein sued the Rolling Stones for breach of settlement because “Shine a Light” and four other songs on the album were composed while Jagger and Richards were under contract with his company, ABKCO. ABKCO acquired publishing rights to the songs, giving it a share of the royalties from Exile on Main St., and was able to publish another album of previously released Rolling Stones songs, More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies).[3]

“Shine a Light” first entered the Stones’ setlist during the 1995 leg of the Voodoo Lounge Tour, and live performances of the song from this period were included on the 1995 album Stripped and its 2016 edition Totally Stripped. The Stones played the song occasionally during their Bridges to Babylon Tour (1997-98) and A Bigger Bang Tour (2005-07). The song gave its name to a 2008 Martin Scorsese film chronicling the Stones’ Beacon Theatre performances on the latter tour, and the October 29, 2006 performance is included on the soundtrack album.

She’s So Cold

“She’s So Cold” is a song recorded by The Rolling Stones, released on 19 September 1980 as the second single from the album Emotional Rescue.

Recording on the song started in early 1979. The single peaked at #33 in the UK Singles Chart and #26 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart in November 1980. [1] Along with the tracks, “Dance” and “Emotional Rescue”, “She’s So Cold” went to #9 on the Disco Top 100 chart [2]

Due to the lyric “she’s so goddamned cold”, the promo 45 sent to radio stations had the “clean version” on side 1. Side 2 was the same song but was identified as “the GD version”.

Chris Martin named it as his favorite Rolling Stones song.[3]

Shattered (song)

“Shattered” is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1978 album Some Girls. The song is a reflection of American lifestyles and life in 1970s-era New York City, but also influences from the English punk rock movement can be heard.

Recorded from October to December 1977, “Shattered” features lyrics sung in sprechgesang by Jagger on a guitar riff by Keith Richards. Jagger commented in a Rolling Stone interview that he wrote the lyrics in the back of a New York cab. Most of Richards’ guitar work is a basic rhythmic pattern strumming out the alternating tonic and dominant chords with each bar, utilising a relatively modest phaser sound effect for some added depth. Due to the absence of bassist Bill Wyman, the bass track is played by Ronnie Wood.

“Shattered” was released as a single in the United States with cover art by illustrator Hubert Kretzschmar and climbed in 1979 to number 31 on the Billboard Hot 100.[1] The Rolling Stones performed the song live for an episode of Saturday Night Live.

A live version was captured during their 1981 tour of America and released on the 1982 live album Still Life. A second version, captured during the band’s A Bigger Bang Tour, appears on Shine a Light. It would act as the opening song for the 1981 compilation Sucking in the Seventies, and the Stones included it on their career retrospective, Forty Licks, in 2002.

The 8-track tape of the Some Girls album features an edited version of “Shattered” clocking in at 2:45, with a shortened intro and guitar break. An instrumental version circulates among collectors.

The track was featured on WKRP in Cincinnati on the episode “Pilot: Part Two”. “Weird Al” Yankovic included this song in his Rolling Stones polka medley “The Hot Rocks Polka”, and also parodied it as “Fatter” by including it in medleys of his first two tours.

She Was Hot

“She Was Hot” is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1983 album Undercover.

Recording on “She Was Hot” first began in late 1982. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the song is a traditional rock ‘n’ roll number from the band. The song is notable as both original Rolling Stones pianist Ian Stewart and his replacement Chuck Leavell perform on the recording.

“She Was Hot” was released as the second single from the album in late January 1984. The B-side to the single was an Emotional Rescue outtake, “I Think I’m Going Mad.” The single did not perform well, reaching only number 44 on the U.S. Charts and number 42 on the U.K. Charts. A memorable video was produced for the song, featuring actress Anita Morris who semi-comically tempts each member of the band. The video version includes an extra verse. As with its predecessor, “Undercover of the Night,” “She Was Hot” was directed by Julien Temple, and was also edited for broadcast on MTV.

The Rolling Stones resurrected “She Was Hot” for the 2006 United States leg of their A Bigger Bang Tour. The song made its live debut on October 11, 2006 in Chicago, and was a regular part of the band’s set list during the tour. The November 1, 2006 performance of “She Was Hot” was captured for the 2008 concert film and live album Shine a Light.

The song was also covered and reworked by Cheap Trick.

Saint of Me

“Saint of Me” is a single by The Rolling Stones from their 1997 album Bridges to Babylon. Mick Jagger sings about various people in history who had converted to Christianity, notably St. Paul and St. Augustine. Jagger then states that they will never make a saint out of him.

The song is notable for its performers. With Jagger on vocals, acoustic guitar and keyboards, Waddy Wachtel and Ron Wood play electric guitars (Keith Richards is notably absent), Me’Shell Ndegéocello and Pierre de Beauport on bass and six-string bass, respectively, and Stones-recording veteran Billy Preston on organ.

“Saint of Me” reached #26 in the UK and #94 in the US. The track also reached #13 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Tracks.
A recording from the Bridges to Babylon Tour can be found on the 1998 live album No Security.
The B-side, “Anyway You Look at It”, is a ballad and appears on the Rarities 1971–2003 compilation, released in 2005.

Rough Justice (The Rolling Stones song)

“Rough Justice” is a song by rock band The Rolling Stones and is the opening track from their 2005 album A Bigger Bang.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Rough Justice” was a heavily collaborative effort like many of the lead singer and guitarist’s latter-day compositions. On the writing, Richards said in 2005, “That came to me in my sleep. It’s almost like “Satisfaction”. Yeah, I almost sort of woke up and said, ‘Where’s my guitar?’ Sometimes you do dream a riff, you know? I had to get up, and it’s really hard to get me up. Once I go down, I go down, you know? But, I mean, it’s only a song that could get me up and start running around the room, ‘Where’s my guitar, where did I put my guitar, before I forget it?’ I don’t often remember dreams, only when they’re musical.”

A straight ahead rocker, but sets the scene of a long time, up and down, love affair between the singer and the subject:

“One time you were my baby chicken, Now you’ve grown into a fox; Once upon a time I was your little rooster, But now I’m just one of your cocks. ”

“It’s rough justice, oh yeah, We never thought it risky; It’s rough justice, But you know I’ll never break your heart; You’re feeling loose and lusty, So if you really want me, Yeah, it’s rough justice; And you know I’ll never break your heart.

Respectable (The Rolling Stones song)

“Respectable” is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1978 album Some Girls. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. In the liner notes to the 1993 compilation album Jump Back: The Best of The Rolling Stones (on which it was included), Jagger said, “It’s important to be somewhat influenced by what’s going on around you and on the Some Girls album, I think we definitely became more aggressive because of the punk thing…”

Plundered My Soul

“Plundered My Soul” is a song by The Rolling Stones featured as a bonus track on the 2010 re-release of their 1972 album Exile on Main St.. It was the first song released by the band from the new recordings, limited-edition copies of the single shelved in independent stores on 17 April 2010, in honor of Record Store Day. The single peaked at number 200 on the UK Top 200 Singles Chart, at number 2 on Billboard’s Singles Sales and number 42 on Billboard’s Rock Songs Airplay. It also reached number 15 in France, and remained there for one week. The music video was directed by Jonas Odell.

“Plundered My Soul” features vocal and guitar overdubs from Mick Jagger and Mick Taylor, recorded at a London studio in November 2009.

Paint It Black

“Paint It Black” (originally released as “Paint It, Black”) is a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones, written by the songwriting partnership of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, and first released as a single on 6 May 1966 (see 1966 in music). It was later included as the opening track to the U.S. version of their 1966 album, Aftermath.[3]

“Paint It Black” reached number one in both the Billboard Hot 100 and UK Singles Chart. The song became The Rolling Stones’ third number one hit single in the US and sixth in the UK.[4][5] Since its initial release, the song has remained influential as the first number one hit featuring a sitar, particularly in the UK where it has charted in two other instances, and has been the subject of multiple cover versions, compilation albums, and film appearances.[6]

Out of Time (The Rolling Stones song)

“Out of Time” is a song by The Rolling Stones, first released on their 1966 album Aftermath (UK version). A shorter alternative mix was released in the US in 1967 on the album Flowers. A third version featuring only Mick Jagger’s vocal (and the orchestration and backing vocals from Chris Farlowe’s cover version plus a new female backing vocal) was released on the 1975 compilation album Metamorphosis, which was created under the direction of former Stones manager Allen Klein and released on his ABKCO Records label. (Klein owned the rights to the pre-1971 Rolling Stones catalog.)[2]

The song was most famously covered by Farlowe, an English solo singer. Farlowe’s single, produced by Jagger, peaked at number one in the UK Singles Chart on 28 July 1966 and stayed at the top for one week.[3]

The Rolling Stones’ recording of the song was used in Hal Ashby’s 1978 film Coming Home. Farlowe’s version was used in the UK TV series Heartbeat.

Out of Control (The Rolling Stones song)

“Out of Control” was the third single from The Rolling Stones’ album Bridges to Babylon. Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it was their second and final single of 1998.[1]

The song was first performed live on the Bridges to Babylon Tour supporting the album. It has been featured in setlists of every tour since.

Out Of Control was “inspired” by the Temptations song “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone” and there’s an as-yet unreleased 10-minute remix which combines both songs.

Oh No, Not You Again

“Oh No, Not You Again” is a song by The Rolling Stones, included on their 2005 hit album A Bigger Bang. The song is listed as the tenth track on the album, and is the latest in a long line of compositions by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Features Mick Jagger on lead, backing vocals & bass, Keith Richards on lead guitar, Ronnie Wood on rhythm guitars, & Watts on drums.

No Spare Parts

“No Spare Parts” is a song by The Rolling Stones, featured as a bonus track on the 2011 re-release of their 1978 album Some Girls. It is one of twelve previously unreleased songs that appear on the reissue, and features newly recorded vocals from Mick Jagger. The song reached number 2 on Billboard’s Hot Singles Sales.

A music video for the song was released on 19 December 2011 and was directed by Mat Whitecross.[3]

No Expectations

“No Expectations” is a song by British rock and roll band The Rolling Stones featured on their 1968 album Beggars Banquet. It was first released as the B-side of the “Street Fighting Man” single in August 1968. The song was recorded in May 1968. Brian Jones’ acoustic slide guitar on the recording represents one of his last major contributions before leaving the band.

This slow ballad was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Bill Janovitz says, “The loneliness expressed in the song is palpable; all about being left behind, the song is certainly a tribute in musical and lyrical tone to such Robert Johnson blues songs as “Love in Vain”-a favourite cover of the Stones-referencing such images as a train leaving the station.”[1]

Jagger said in a 1995 interview in Rolling Stone, “That’s Brian playing [the slide guitar]. We were sitting around in a circle on the floor, singing and playing, recording with open mikes. That was the last time I remember Brian really being totally involved in something that was really worth doing”.[2] Accompanying Jones is Richards on acoustic rhythm guitar. Janovitz remarked that Richards, “play[s] the same open-tuned rhythm he would later use on ‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want’, also contributing to that lonely ambience.” The song is also noted for its simple claves-kept beat by Charlie Watts and Nicky Hopkins’s “building single-chord organ” and ornamental turns on piano.

Neighbours (song)

“Neighbours” is a song by The Rolling Stones featured on their 1981 album Tattoo You.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Neighbours” is notable as being one of two songs from Tattoo You which isn’t an outtake from earlier recording sessions. Jagger was inspired by Richards’ own run-ins with his neighbours after the guitarist was evicted from his New York City apartment after complaints that he was playing music too loudly. On the story, Richards said at the time of release, “…Patti [Hansen] (Richards’ wife) and I (have been evicted from apartments in New York). Mick wrote the lyrics to that – and he never has trouble with neighbours… I have a knack of finding a whole building of very cool people, you know, but there’ll be one uncool couple… ‘Neighbours’ is the first song I think Mick’s ever really written for me. It’s one I wish I’d written, that.”

“Neighbours, do yourself a favour, Don’t you mess with my baby when I’m working all night, You know that neighbours steal off of my table, Steal off of my table, ain’t doing all right.”

Recording took place between the months of October and November 1980, and April through June 1981, at Paris’ Pathé Marconi Studios and Atlantic Studios in New York City. With Jagger on lead vocals, electric guitars are performed by Richards and Ronnie Wood, with Wood taking the solo. Charlie Watts and Bill Wyman perform drums and bass, respectively. Sonny Rollins also contributes saxophone, one of his three credits for the album. Ian Stewart performs the song’s piano.

An elaborate music video was produced in support of the song, which featured the Stones in an apartment building setting and was a take-off on the Alfred Hitchcock film Rear Window.

“Neighbours” was performed by the Stones throughout their tours in support of Tattoo You. It re-emerged for performances on their 2002-2003 Licks Tour, with one performance being captured and released on the 2004 album Live Licks.

Mother’s Little Helper

“Mother’s Little Helper” is a song by the English rock band the Rolling Stones. It first appeared as the opening track to the United Kingdom version of their 1966 album Aftermath.

It was released as a single in the United States and peaked at #8 on the Billboard Singles Charts in 1966. The B-side “Lady Jane” peaked at #24.[1] The song deals with the sudden popularity of prescribed calming drugs among housewives, and the potential hazards of overdose or addiction. The drug in question is variously assumed to be meprobamate or diazepam (valium)[2]

Moonlight Mile (song)

“Moonlight Mile” is a song from The Rolling Stones’ 1971 album Sticky Fingers.

Many consider “Moonlight Mile” one of the Rolling Stones’ most underappreciated ballads.[1] “Moonlight Mile” was the last song recorded for the album. Recording took place during the end of October 1970 at Stargroves. The song was the product of an all-night session between Jagger and guitarist Mick Taylor. Taylor had taken a short guitar piece recorded by Richards (entitled “Japanese Thing”) and reworked it for the session. Jagger performs the song’s prominent acoustic guitar riff. Jagger felt it easier to extemporize with Taylor, as Richards was not present. It was Taylor’s idea to add a string arrangement by Paul Buckmaster to the song. Jim Price—the Rolling Stones’ usual trumpeter—plays piano. Taylor claims he was promised some songwriting credit, but found himself surprised that he did not when the song was released on Sticky Fingers.[2][3][4][5] Richards and Jagger took credit for the song.

“Moonlight Mile was all Mick’s. As far as I can remember, Mick came in with the whole idea of that, and the band just figured out how to play it.[6] – Keith Richards, Life magazine

The lyrics are elliptical and mysterious, but touch on the alienation of life on the road.

“The sound of strangers sending nothing to my mind; Just another mad mad day on the road; I am just living to be lying by your side, But I’m just about a moonlight mile on down the road ”

In a review of the song, Bill Janovitz says, “Though the song still referenced drugs and the road life of a pop-music celebrity, it really is a rare example of Jagger letting go of his public persona, offering a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the weariness that accompanies the pressures of keeping up appearances as a sex-drugs-and-rock & roll star.”[1] Rock critic Robert Christgau said the song, “re-created all the paradoxical distances inherent in erotic love with a power worthy of Yeats, yet could also be interpreted as a cocaine song.”[7] This is a reference to the first stanza, which reads, “When the wind blows and the rain feels cold, With a head full of snow…” . It was meant to be about coming down from a cocaine high. However, Mick Jagger would later dismiss any suggestions of the song being an allegory for drug use, and stated that ” The feeling [he] had at that moment was how difficult it was to be touring and how [he] wasn’t looking forward to going out and doing it again. It’s a very lonely thing, and [his] lyrics reflected that”.[8]

The track featured extensively during The Sopranos’ “Kaisha”, the twelfth episode of the sixth season of the HBO series, as well as giving its title to and being used in the 2002 motion picture Moonlight Mile. The song has been covered live by The Flaming Lips and on The 5th Dimension album, Earthbound. American hard rock supergroup Saints of the Underground covered this song for their only album Love the Sin, Hate the Sinner. Southern soul artist Lee Fields covered this song on his 2012 album Faithful Man.

Monkey Man (The Rolling Stones song)

“Monkey Man” is a song by English rock band The Rolling Stones, featured as the eighth track on their 1969 album Let It Bleed.

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards wrote Monkey Man as a tribute to Italian pop artist Mario Schifano, whom they met on the set of his movie “Umano Non Umano!” (“Human, Not Human!”).[2] Recorded in April 1969, the song’s introduction features distinctive vibraphone, bass and guitar, as well as piano. Richards plays the main guitar riff as well as the slide guitar solo, Jagger provides vocals, producer Jimmy Miller plays tambourine, Nicky Hopkins plays piano, Charlie Watts provides drums, while Bill Wyman plays vibraphone and bass. Wyman’s vibraphone is mixed onto the left speaker together with Hopkins’ piano.

Mixed Emotions (The Rolling Stones song)

“Mixed Emotions” is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1989 album Steel Wheels.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards while on vacation in Barbados, “Mixed Emotions” was recorded in Montserrat from March through June 1989. The song was a heavy collaborative effort between Jagger and Richards. Richards brought his own music to the sessions along with most of the song’s lyrics, the rest being filled in by Jagger in the studio.

Miss You (The Rolling Stones song)

“Miss You” is a song written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. It was released as a single by The Rolling Stones on Rolling Stones Records in May 1978, one month in advance of their album Some Girls, and peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100. An extended version, called the “Special Disco Version”, was released as the band’s first dance remix on a 12-inch single.

“Miss You” was written by Mick Jagger jamming with keyboardist Billy Preston during rehearsals for the March 1977 El Mocambo club gigs, recordings from which appeared on side three of double live album Love You Live (1977). Keith Richards is credited as co-writer as was the case for all Rolling Stones originals written by either partner or in tandem.

Midnight Rambler

“Midnight Rambler” is a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones, released on their 1969 album Let It Bleed. The song is a loose biography of Albert DeSalvo, who confessed to being the Boston Strangler.[2]

Keith Richards has called the number “a blues opera”[3] and the quintessential Jagger-Richards song, stating in the 2012 documentary Crossfire Hurricane that “nobody else could have written that song.”

Memory Motel

“Memory Motel” is a song from rock band The Rolling Stones’ 1976 album Black and Blue.

A ballad, the song is credited to singer Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards (Richard at the time). It is a significant song as it is one of the few which feature both members sharing lead vocals. The song itself runs over seven minutes, one of the longest songs by the Rolling Stones.[1]

Jagger began writing the song before beginning the Stones’ Tour of the Americas ’75 while staying with Richards at Andy Warhol’s house in Montauk, New York and finished it while on tour. This is reflected in the song’s lyrics where Jagger describes having to leave for Baton Rouge, where the Stones played two warm up shows at Louisiana State University, and where he describes subsequent experiences on the road.

The title comes from an actual motel in Montauk, on Long Island. The lyrics to the song have long drawn speculation as to who the “Hannah baby” in the lyrics refer to. Carly Simon is often a name considered, due to Jagger’s descriptions of the woman throughout the song; ‘Hannah’ was in reference to Annie Leibovitz, who was the Rolling Stones 1975 Tour of the Americas photographer. She spent time with the band during their rehearsals at Andy Warhol’s complex near Montauk. Jagger describes her thus:

Hannah honey was a peachy kind of girl; Her eyes were hazel, And her nose was slightly curved….

Her eyes were hazel, And her teeth were slightly curved; She took my guitar and she began to play, She sang a song to me, Stuck right in my brain… When I asked her where she headed for Back up to Boston I’m singing in a bar

The lyrics talk of the fading love brought on by a one-night stand at said motel. The song describes the female subject as a strong, independent woman, comparable in many ways to the female subject of “Ruby Tuesday”, with Richards repeated refrain:

She got a mind of her own, And she use it well…

Richards did not play guitar on this piece; Black and Blue has long been known as the album used to find a replacement for Mick Taylor, who left right before work was to begin on it. Harvey Mandel plays electric guitar while Wayne Perkins performs acoustic. Jagger, Richards, and Billy Preston play acoustic piano, electric piano, and string synthesizer on the song, respectively. Preston also contributes backing vocals along with Ron Wood, who would eventually become the Stones’ lead guitarist. The song was recorded in Munich, Germany at Musicland Studios in March and April 1975. Overdubs and re-recordings were performed later in the year.

“Memory Motel” has long been a fan favourite from the Stones’ canon of work. It is often overlooked, possibly due to its length and downbeat feel, much like the album it comes from. Motley Crue founder Nikki Sixx has frequently listed it as one of his favorite songs of all time. [1]. It was one of the highlights of the Stones’ 1998 live album No Security, where Dave Matthews took up lead vocals with Jagger and Richards. The song has been played live on every tour since the 1994 Voodoo Lounge Tour.

For an episode of the 1990 TV music show Beyond The Groove by Jagger collaborator David A. Stewart, Jagger recorded a version of “Memory Motel” without Keith Richards.[2]

Loving Cup (song)

“Loving Cup” is a song by The Rolling Stones featured on their 1972 album Exile on Main St.

An early version of this song, with a completely different piano intro, was recorded between April and July 1969 at Olympic Sound Studios in London, during the Let It Bleed sessions. (This version of the song—or at least part of it, spliced with another outtake—was released in 2010 on the deluxe remastered release of Exile on Main St.)

Recording of the version of “Loving Cup” that appears on Exile on Main St. started in December 1971 at Los Angeles’ Sunset Sound Studios and lasted until March 1972. Mick Jagger performs lead and backing vocals with Keith Richards. Richards also performs the song’s guitars. Bass and drums are provided by Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts, respectively. Piano is provided by Stones’ recording veteran Nicky Hopkins. Saxophone is by Bobby Keys and both trumpet and trombone are by Jim Price. The album’s producer, Jimmy Miller, provides the maracas. It is not known who plays the steel drum.

After the release of Exile on Main St., Allen Klein sued the Rolling Stones for breach of settlement because “Loving Cup” and four other songs on the album were composed while Jagger and Richards were under contract with his company, ABKCO. ABKCO acquired publishing rights to the songs, giving it a share of the royalties from Exile on Main St., and was able to publish another album of previously released Rolling Stones songs, More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies).[1]

“Loving Cup” has been performed sporadically by the Stones since its introduction to their catalogue. It was performed at the Stones’ concert in Hyde Park on 5 July 1969, was heard during the 1972 tour of America, and was re-introduced to setlists during the 2002-2003 Licks Tour. It was also performed with Jack White during the 2006 leg of the A Bigger Bang Tour, with this version featured in the Martin Scorsese 2008 documentary film Shine a Light and on the soundtrack album.

Jonathan Zwickel of Pitchfork considers it “some of the Rolling Stones’ most enduring and soulful work.”[2]

Live with Me

“Live with Me” is a song by The Rolling Stones from their album Let It Bleed, released in November 1969. It was the first song recorded with the band’s new guitarist Mick Taylor, who joined the band in June 1969,[2] although the first record the band released with Taylor was the single version of Honky Tonk Women. Taylor later described the recording of “Live with Me” as “kind of the start of that particular era for the Stones, where Keith and I traded licks.”[3]

The song also marks the first time the Stones recorded with tenor saxophonist Bobby Keys (who played on many Stones records thereafter),[4] and the only time Leon Russell would play with the Stones. Russell and Nicky Hopkins contributed piano to the piece.

Written by Mick Jagger and Richards, “Live with Me” was recorded on 24 May 1969. As Taylor joined the band weeks later, his guitar part was dubbed over the basic track. Along with “Country Honk”, this was of two songs guitarist Mick Taylor played on Let It Bleed. Him and Keith Richards created an original 2 lead guitar sound.[5]

The song’s lyrics were cited as the reason why the London Bach Choir asked not to be credited for their contribution to “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”[citation needed]. The poet X. J. Kennedy suggested that the lyrics are part of a tradition of responses, beginning with John Donne and Sir Walter Raleigh and continuing through C. Day-Lewis, to Christopher Marlowe’s “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love”. Marlowe’s poem begins “Come live with me and be my love”.[citation needed]

Although never released as a single, the song has been frequently performed live, and concert versions appear on the albums Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out!, No Security, and Light the Fuse, as well as the 1996 “Wild Horses” (live) single and the Rarities 1971–2003 compilation album. The song was performed live with Christina Aguilera for the movie concert/documentary Shine a Light, and appears on the accompanying soundtrack album.

Cover versions were recorded by Girlschool, Ghost and Rhett Forrester (1984 album Gone With the Wind).

Little by Little (The Rolling Stones song)

“Little by Little” was released by The Rolling Stones on the Decca label on February 21, 1964, as the B-side to their version of “Not Fade Away”. Also included on their debut album The Rolling Stones in April 1964.

Recorded in late January 1964, it was their first Top 5 hit in the United Kingdom, reaching #3. Phil Spector was in the studio, and was given co-credit with “Nanker Phelge” for writing this typical up-tempo Stones blues.

Let It Loose (song)

“Let It Loose” is a song by The Rolling Stones which was released as the last song on side three of their 1972 double album Exile on Main St..

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Let It Loose” is an emotional gospel blues ballad with a fervent religious feeling, the song being one of the band’s prominent forays into soul and gospel during the Exile era after Jagger had attended the services of the Reverend James Cleveland and remained deeply impressed by the singing of the gospel choir.[1] A portion of the lyrics were lifted from the song Man of Constant Sorrow. In an interview with Uncut Magazine in April 2010, Jagger was asked about this song’s lyrical content; he replied: “I think Keith wrote that, actually. That’s a very weird, difficult song. I had a whole other set of lyrics to it, but they got lost by the wayside. I don’t think that song has any semblance of meaning. It’s one of those rambling songs. I didn’t really understand what it was about, after the event.” However, in the same article Richards says “I would never take Mick’s recollection of anything seriously.”[2]

Recording began in December 1971 and continued through March 1972, with some recording taking place at Nellcôte using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. With Jagger on lead vocals, backing vocals are provided by Tami Lynn, Dr. John, Clydie King, Venetta Fields, Shirley Goodman and Joe Green. Electric guitars were performed by Richards and Mick Taylor, and played through a Leslie speaker. Bass is performed by Bill Wyman, Charlie Watts on drums, Nicky Hopkins on piano, Bobby Keys on tenor saxophone, and Jim Price plays both trombone and trumpet.

Russell Hall in the 20 February 2008 edition of Gibson Lifestyle describes Jagger’s strident, heart-wrenching singing on “Let It Loose” as his finest vocal achievement.[1]

“Let It Loose” has never been performed live by the Rolling Stones.[3] Phish covered the song as part of their “costume” album during Festival 8 in 2009, and then again on June 30, 2012.

The song was featured in Martin Scorsese’s 2006 film The Departed and included on its soundtrack.

The song was also featured in Kevin Spacey’s 2004 film Beyond the Sea but is not included on the movie’s soundtrack.

Let It Bleed (song)

“Let It Bleed” is a song by English rock band The Rolling Stones. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and features on the 1969 album of the same name. It was released as a single in Japan in February 1970.

Ian Stewart plays piano on this track (his only appearance on the album) while Bill Wyman plays autoharp.

The song opens with a slide piece and quickly moves into a solo acoustic guitar capo on the 3rd fret strumming A, D, E before bass, drums and piano join in, respectively. Wyman’s autoharp can be heard somewhat faintly during the first verse with noticeable ‘ping’ sounds coming from it around the 0:40-0:50 mark but it is mostly inaudible throughout the track after the 0:55 (‘she said my breasts’) minute mark.

The lyrics include a number of drug and sexual references, including an invitation for “coke and sympathy,” a reference to a “junkie nurse” and Jagger’s suggestions that we all need someone to “bleed on,” “cream on” and “come on” him.[2] However, to Allmusic critic Richie Unterberger, the song is mainly about “emotional dependency,” with Jagger willing to accept a partner who wants to lean “on him for emotional support.”[2]

Unterberger also asserts that “Let It Bleed” may be “the best illustration” of the way the Rolling Stones make “a slightly sloppy approach work for them rather than against them.”[2] He also praises Jagger’s vocals, stating the song represents “one of his best vocals, with a supremely lazy approach that seems to be both affectionate and mocking at the same time.”[2]

Jumpin’ Jack Flash

“Jumpin’ Jack Flash” is a song by English rock band the Rolling Stones, released as a single in 1968.[3] Called “supernatural Delta blues by way of Swinging London” by Rolling Stone magazine,[5] the song was perceived by some as the band’s return to their blues roots after the psychedelia of their preceding albums, Aftermath (1966), Between the Buttons (1967), Flowers (1967) and Their Satanic Majesties Request (1967).[6][7] One of the group’s most popular and recognisable songs, it has featured in films and been covered by numerous performers, notably Aretha Franklin, Tina Turner, Peter Frampton, Johnny Winter and Leon Russell.

Jigsaw Puzzle (song)

“Jigsaw Puzzle,” sometimes spelled “Jig-Saw Puzzle” is a song by rock and roll band the Rolling Stones, featured on their 1968 album Beggars Banquet.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Jigsaw Puzzle” is one of the longer songs on the album. It comes in just ten seconds shorter than “Sympathy for the Devil” to which it is stylistically similar.

Parts of the recording sessions are available on the bootleg market, and on these recordings, Jagger is on acoustic guitar, Richards on electric slide guitar, Charlie Watts on drums, Bill Wyman on bass, and Nicky Hopkins on piano. Brian Jones is not present on these sessions. The released version has Richards on acoustic and slide guitar. Jones adds the distinctive “whine” throughout with a mellotron. “Jigsaw Puzzle” has never been performed live by the Stones.

It’s All Over Now

“It’s All Over Now” is a song written by Bobby Womack and Shirley Womack.[1] It was first released by The Valentinos featuring Bobby Womack. The Valentinos version entered the Billboard Hot 100 on June 27, 1964, where it stayed on the chart for two weeks, peaking at number 94. The Rolling Stones had their first number-one hit with this song in July 1964.

I’m Free (The Rolling Stones song)

“I’m Free” is a song by The Rolling Stones written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, first released as the final track on the UK Out of Our Heads album on 24 September 1965. It was later placed on the December’s Children (And Everybody’s) album in the United States.

The Rolling Stones recorded a re-worked acoustic version for their 1995 album Stripped, and performed a live version in the 2008 film Shine a Light, which was included on the accompanying live album.

The original vinyl bootleg Live’r Than You’ll Ever Be included a live version recorded in Oakland, California, in November 1969.

The song uses a line from The Beatles’ 1964 song “Eight Days a Week”: “Hold me, love me, hold me, love me.”

I Got the Blues

“I Got the Blues” is a song from the Rolling Stones’ 1971 album Sticky Fingers.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “I Got the Blues” is a slow-paced, bluesy song in 6/8 time. It features languid guitars with heavy influence of both blues and soul feel.

In his review, Richie Unterberger compares the Stones’ take on their early influences, saying, “Musically, it’s very much in the school of slow Stax ballads, by [Otis] Redding and some others, with slow reverbed guitars with a gospel feel, dignified brass, and a slow buildup of tension.”[1] A notable reference point is the Otis Redding-ballad “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long”, a song that the Stones themselves had recorded in 1965 and very similar in style and buildup.

Recorded during the months of March through May 1970, the song features Jagger on lead vocals, Richards and Mick Taylor on guitars, Bill Wyman on bass, Charlie Watts on drums, and Billy Preston on Hammond organ. Stones’ recording veterans Bobby Keys and Jim Price performed on the saxophone and trumpet, respectively.

I Go Wild

“I Go Wild” is a song by The Rolling Stones featured on their 1994 album Voodoo Lounge. Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “I Go Wild” is largely a Jagger composition.[1]

On its creation, Jagger said in 1994, “‘I Go Wild’, I suppose, is the one I play (guitar) on most. I mean, I just created it on guitar with Charlie [Watts], as a groove. And we more or less had the whole song down before we took it to anyone else.”[1] On the song overall, Jagger said, ” I like that song. I really got into the lyrics on that one. One of the wordy ones.”

A straightforward rock song, “I Go Wild”‘s lyrics tell of the singer’s relationship with an unnamed “femme fatale”;

“And the doctor says you’ll be okay, And if you’d only stay away; From femme fatales and dirty bitches, And daylight drabs and nighttime witches, And working girls and blue stockings, And dance hall babes and body poppers,

And waitresses with broken noses, Checkout girls striking poses,

And politicians’ garish wives, With alcoholic cunts like knives”

“I go wild when you’re in my face; I go wild when I taste your taste;

I go wild and I go insane; I get sick – somebody stop this pain”

“I Go Wild” was recorded between the months of July and August and November and December 1993 at Sandymount Studios, Ireland and A&M Recording Studios, Los Angeles.[1] With Jagger on lead vocals, Richards and Ron Wood accompany him on electric guitars. Charlie Watts performs drums while Darryl Jones performs bass. Chuck Leavell performs the song’s organ while Phil Jones incorporate percussion. Jagger, Richards, Bernard Fowler, and Ivan Neville perform backing vocals.[2]

“I Go Wild” was released as the fourth single from Voodoo Lounge. Following its UK release on July 3, 1995, it reached number 29 on the UK singles chart. A video was shot at Ex-templo de San Lázaro in Mexico City immediately before the Stones’ fourteen stadium tour of South America. The song was performed throughout the 1994-1995 Voodoo Lounge Tour;[1] a live version from 1994 appeared on the maxi-single, and a 1995 live performance was released in 2016 on Totally Stripped.

Hot Stuff (The Rolling Stones song)

“Hot Stuff” is a song by English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones off their 1976 album Black and Blue.

“Hot Stuff”, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, was recorded in March, October and December 1975 during the Black and Blue sessions, and is heavily influenced by the disco/funk sounds of the day, with Charlie Watts laying down a heavy drum pattern accompanied by Ollie E. Brown on percussion, Bill Wyman adding a funky bassline, and extensive use of the Wah-wah pedal by guest guitarist Harvey Mandel, formerly of Canned Heat. Mandel plays the lead guitar parts on the song and was one of the guitarists in consideration for replacing the departed Mick Taylor’s slot as the Stones’ lead guitarist, a position eventually filled by Ron Wood. Billy Preston plays piano on the recording and contributes backing vocals along with Richards and Wood. The video, however, features Wood on guitar playing Mandel’s part.

The second and final single from Black and Blue (following the worldwide top 10 hit “Fool to Cry”) “Hot Stuff” was not as successful as its predecessor, reaching #49 in the United States. Despite the relative failure of the single, however, the band would continue to explore the disco/funk sounds heard on the recording with later albums and singles – their next single, the disco-infused “Miss You”, would reach the top position in the US two years later.

Honky Tonk Women

“Honky Tonk Women” is a 1969 hit song by The Rolling Stones. Released as a single only release (although a country version was included on “Let It Bleed”), on 4 July 1969 in the United Kingdom and a week later in the United States, it topped the charts in both nations.[3]

The song was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards while on holiday in Brazil from late December 1968 to early January 1969, inspired by Brazilian “caipiras” (inhabitants of rural, remote areas of parts of Brazil) at the ranch where Jagger and Richards were staying in Matão, São Paulo.[4] Two versions of the song were recorded by the band: the familiar hit which appeared on the 45 single and their collection of late 1960s singles, Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2); and a honky-tonk version entitled “Country Honk” with slightly different lyrics, which appeared on Let It Bleed (1969).

Highwire (song)

“Highwire” is an anti-war song by The Rolling Stones featured on their 1991 live album Flashpoint.[1]

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Highwire” is one of the rare examples of the Stones taking on political issues – in this case, the fall-out from Persian Gulf War. On the song, Jagger said at the time of its release, “It’s not about the war. It’s about how it started.”[2] Richards continued, saying, “This is not about the war. It’s about how you build up some shaky dictator. You can’t build them up, ’cause then you’ve got to slam them down.”[2]

The song’s lyrics deconstructed the build-up to the war, and criticized the politics behind it:

“  We sell ’em missiles, We sell ’em tanks; We give ’em credit, You can call the bank; It’s just a business, You can pay us in crude; You love these toys, just go play out your feuds; Got no pride, don’t know whose boots to lick; We act so greedy, makes me sick sick sick. ”

“  We walk the highwire; Sending the men up to the front line; Hoping they don’t catch the hell fire; With hot guns and cold, cold lies.”

“Highwire” was released as Flashpoint’s first single on 1 March 1991. It reached #29 in the UK, #57 in the US, #28 on the Modern Rock Tracks chart, and #1 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. An accompanying video directed by Julien Temple was released and depicted the Stones in an industrial set performing the song.

Hey Negrita (song)

“Hey Negrita” is a song by The Rolling Stones that appeared on their 1976 album Black and Blue.

Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, Ron Wood apparently wrote the song’s main riff, a piece of music he took with him to Munich’s Musicland Studios where he and other guitarists were auditioning for the second guitarist slot left open after the departure of Mick Taylor.[1] For his contribution, Wood would receive an “inspiration by” credit on the final album. In 2003, Wood recounted, “All of us, independently and together, were into reggae, and it was also a mood of the time. I had this particular lick that I took into the studio and the others said, What are we going to start with? and I said, I’ve got this song. Charlie [Watts] was sitting behind his kit, so he was already into it and then Keith and Mick both got into the motion of it. That was ‘Hey Negrita’, which came together very easily. The key to getting a song across in this band is never to try and write all the words. If you’ve got the rhythm, you’re lucky! Let Mick write the words and then you’re in with a chance.”[2]

In his review, Bill Janovitz says, “[Hey Negrita] straddles Latin, reggae, and funk musical styles. Mick Jagger had been spending a lot of time in New York City and absorbing new elements of dance music, specifically Latin forms.”[1] Black and Blue is known for its heavy contribution from Stones recording and touring veteran Billy Preston, of which Janovitz says, “…Preston plays a very percussive Afro-Cuban-sounding piano part over the… riff.”[1] Also prominent is Ollie Brown (another veteran of the Stones’ mid-1970s tours) who provides the song’s heavily Latin-influenced percussion.[1]

Of the song’s substance, Janovitz says, “Jagger again chooses not to shy away from controversy… “Negrita,” a Spanish term translating as “little black girl,” was a pet name he had coined for his wife at the time, Bianca, a Latina. The song, however, is undeniably sexy, and Jagger is playing with the stereotypical Central and South American approaches to the battle of the sexes.”[1]

“ I say Hey negrita, hey now; Move your body, move your mouth; Shake, lady, way down south; Shake, baby, in your home town  ”

“ Flash of gold in your ears, child; Flash of gold in your eyes; Saw the gleam in your mouth; Saw the steel in your thighs  ”

Janovitz concludes, “Mostly, though, the lyrics are meant to stay out of the way of the groove and are an excuse to throw in some fresh-sounding Spanish phrases. But the song did little to avoid the controversy the Stones continued to stoke…”[1] This song, along with some of the promotional billboards for Black and Blue, were called out for their apparent sexist content directed towards women, a criticism not new to the Stones at the time.[1] Jagger said at the time, “Hey Negrita. It’s a compliment. I mean, it’s not a put down. I mean, what’s the problem, the ‘Hey’ part? No, I think ‘hey’ will get past. What, you think colored people won’t like it? Well… only the most sensitive ones. It’s about South Americans, that’s just what you say, you know? You say, hey negrita… one negri… negrota… you say to a lady one, a lady negress… hey negrita! In fact, it’s been done, been said to my old lady, you see?”[2]

While considered “splendid… edgy, funky” by Janovitz and popular among Stones fans, it is considered one of the songs that earned Black and Blue its unofficial title as the Stones’ “jam album”. Recorded in December, 1974 and in March and April 1975 at Munich and Mountain Recording Studios in Montreux, “Hey Negrita” features Jagger on lead vocals, Richards and Wood (lead) on guitars, Bill Wyman on bass, and Watts on drums. In addition to piano, Preston also performs organ and backing vocals with Richards and Wood.[2]

“Hey Negrita” has only been performed live during the Tour of Europe ’76, evidently because of the controversial lyrics (although one of the longtime mainstays of the band’s shows, “Brown Sugar”, has similar issues with its lyrics).

Heart of Stone (The Rolling Stones song)

“Heart of Stone” is a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones, released as a single in 1964 in the United States, and on an extended-play single in Europe (pictured). It was not released in the United Kingdom until featuring on the Out of Our Heads UK album released September 1965.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Heart of Stone” was scheduled as a single release in the United States. In the United Kingdom it appeared as a track on the UK album Out of Our Heads and in many European countries on an EP with a subsequent single. In the Netherlands the EP reached No. 6 in the singles charts.[1]

Richie Unterberger says, “‘Heart of Stone’ [is] a slow and soulful, dramatic ballad with the kind of vaguely discordant, droning guitars heard on many an early Rolling Stones slow number. What was impressive was how the Jagger/Richards song, though similar in some respect to American soul ballads of the period…was not explicitly derivative of any one blues or soul song that they were covering on their mid-60s records. The lilt of the verses owed something to country music and the mournful harmonies heard on the latter part of the verses added to the overall feeling of melancholy moodiness.”[2]

The song sees the singer discuss his life as a womanizer, and how one girl in particular won’t break his heart;

There’ve been so many girls that I’ve known; I’ve made so many cry and still I wonder why; Here comes the little girl; I see her walking down the street; She’s all by herself, I try and knock her off her feet; But she’ll never break, never break, never break, never break, This heart of stone

Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?

“Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?” is a song by English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones. It first appeared as a single in September 1966 and was included as the opening track on the British version of their 1966 compilation album Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass).

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the song was recorded in the late summer of 1966 during early sessions for what would become their Between the Buttons LP. It is famous for its horn section arrangement (arranged by Mike Leander; this is the first Rolling Stones song to feature brass) and is one of the earliest songs to use feedback from the guitars. The Stones have said that they were unhappy with the final cut, bemoaning the loss of the original cut’s strong rhythm section. This was the first song Keith Richards is said to have written on piano even though he does not play piano on the final cut. Jack Nitzsche, friend of the band and their occasional pianist, is credited in the session logs to piano, multi-instrumentalist Brian Jones is also credited in the logs for playing the piano. But when the band mimed the song on The Ed Sullivan Show in October 1966, Richards is seen miming the piano and Jones miming the guitar. The song is noted for its distorted Guitar ending, after all of the other instruments, as well as the vocalists drop out of the song, ending on a distorted guitar chord in the dominant. The song is in the key of G Major, and ends in the key of D Major.

It was released as a single in September 1966 simultaneously in the UK and the US (a first for the band), and reached #5 and #9 on those countries’ charts, respectively.

The single is famous for its cover featuring the band dressed in drag. Peter Whitehead’s promotional film for the single was one of the first music videos. A fan favourite, the song appears on many hits compilations and was recorded for the live album Got Live If You Want It!.

The track was released on the 2002 compilation album, Forty Licks with the abbreviated title of “Have You Seen Your Mother Baby?”.

It has not been played live by the Stones since the 1966 tour (it was only ever played live by the Stones over a span of twelve days); however, Jagger performed it in New York in 1993 during his only solo show promoting the album Wandering Spirit.

The B-side is “Who’s Driving Your Plane?”, a bluesy track, which, for unknown reasons, was mis-titled “Who’s Driving My Plane?” in the US.

Happy (The Rolling Stones song)

“Happy” is the tenth track on The Rolling Stones’ 1972 album Exile on Main St. Keith Richards sings lead vocals. Released as the second single from the album in July 1972, “Happy” entered the Billboard Hot 100 at No. 69 on 15 July 1972 and reached No. 22 on 19 August 1972.[1]

Credited to Jagger/Richards, “Happy” was written primarily by Keith Richards in summer 1971, at the villa Nellcôte in southern France, over the course of a single afternoon. According to Richards, “We did that in an afternoon, in only four hours, cut and done. At noon it had never existed. At four o’clock it was on tape.”[2] The basic tracks were recorded in the Nellcôte basement, using the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio, with Richards on bass, guitar and vocals, producer Jimmy Miller on drums, and saxophonist Bobby Keys on maracas.[3] Piano by Nicky Hopkins was added later, as were Jim Price’s trumpet, Keys’ saxophone, Mick Taylor’s guitar and the final vocal tracks, including Mick Jagger’s backing vocals.[4]

Goin’ Home (The Rolling Stones song)

“Goin’ Home” is a song by rock band The Rolling Stones featured on their 1966 album Aftermath.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Goin’ Home” is a long blues-inspired track that is notable as one of the first songs by a rock and roll band to break the ten-minute mark and the longest recorded song on any Stones album.[1] While many bands had experimented with length in live performances, and Bob Dylan had written many songs by this point which reached the five/six-minute mark, “Goin’ Home” was the first “jam” recorded expressly for an album. In an interview with the magazine Rolling Stone, Richards said:

It was the first long rock and roll cut. It broke that two-minute barrier. We tried to make singles as long as we could do then because we just liked to let things roll on. Dylan was used to building a song for 20 minutes because of the folk thing he came from.

That was another thing. No one sat down to make an 11-minute track. I mean ‘Goin’ Home’, the song was written just the first 2 and a half minutes. We just happened to keep the tape rolling, me on guitar, Brian [Jones] on harp, Bill Wyman [Wyman, on bass] and Charlie [Watts, on drums] and Mick. If there’s a piano, it’s Stew [Ian Stewart].[2]

Jack Nitzsche, a regular Stones contributor throughout the 1960s, here performs percussion.

The song, while lengthy, is built around a common theme, as opposed to later Stones songs of great length like “Midnight Rambler” or “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” which are divided into distinct sections punctuated by differing instrumentations. “Goin’ Home” plays as a long jam, eventually deconstructing Richards’ guitar piece, Jagger’s lyrics, and Watts’ drum lines which build in power as the song progresses. Jagger’s lyrics are called “a basic expression of [his] pining for his girl and determining to go home and get him some. It’s the bumpety-bump, ascending chorus of announcing his intentions to go home that’s the most ‘pop’ element of the song.”[3]

“Goin’ Home” can be heard in the happening sequence of 1967 film Col cuore in gola.

Gimme Shelter

“Gimme Shelter” is a song by the Rolling Stones. It first appeared as the opening track on the band’s 1969 album Let It Bleed. Although the first word was spelled “Gimmie” on that album, subsequent recordings by the band and other musicians have made “Gimme” the customary spelling. Greil Marcus, writing in Rolling Stone magazine at the time of its release, said of it, “The Stones have never done anything better.”[2]

The recording features Richards playing in his new open tuning; the guitar riff is widely considered to be among the most distinctive and recognizable in the history of rock music.[citation needed]

The recording also features powerful vocals by Merry Clayton, recorded at a last-minute late-night recording session during the mixing phase, arranged by her friend and record producer Jack Nitzsche.[3] Lisa Fischer was later recruited to perform the song during their concerts.

Fool to Cry

“Fool to Cry” is a ballad[1] by English rock band The Rolling Stones from their 1976 album Black and Blue.

The song was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Mick Taylor had just left the band and the rest of the Stones were left without a lead guitarist. The recording of Black and Blue acted as a sort of audition for new guitarists, which led to session man Wayne Perkins playing guitar on this track.[citation needed] Jagger plays electric piano and Nicky Hopkins performs regular piano on the track, with Hopkins also playing the string synthesizer.

Released as the lead single off Black and Blue on 20 April 1976, “Fool to Cry” reached No. 6 on the UK Singles Chart and No. 10 on the US Billboard Hot 100.

“Fool to Cry” was the only track from Black and Blue to appear on the Stones’ career-spanning greatest hits albums Forty Licks in 2002 and GRRR! in 2012.

Factory Girl (The Rolling Stones song)

“Factory Girl” is a song by The Rolling Stones which appears on their 1968 album Beggars Banquet.

It is very similar to an Appalachian folk tune, especially due to its minimal arrangement, featuring Mick Jagger on vocals, Keith Richards on acoustic guitar, Rocky Dijon on conga drums, Ric Grech of Family on fiddle/violin, Dave Mason, Nicky Hopkins or Brian Jones plays Mellotron using the mandolin sound,[1] and Charlie Watts on tabla.[1].

On his performance, Charlie Watts said in 2003, “On ‘Factory Girl’, I was doing something you shouldn’t do, which is playing the tabla with sticks instead of trying to get that sound using your hand, which Indian tabla players do, though it’s an extremely difficult technique and painful if you’re not trained.”[2]

The song is composed of lyrics musing on the singer’s relationship with a young woman, all while he is waiting for her to come out to meet him;

“ Waiting for a girl who’s got curlers in her hair; Waiting for a girl, she has no money anywhere; We get buses everywhere; Waiting for a factory girl  ”

Richards said of the song in 2003, “To me ‘Factory Girl’ felt something like ‘Molly Malone’, an Irish jig; one of those ancient Celtic things that emerge from time to time, or an Appalachian song. In those days I would just come up and play something, sitting around the room. I still do that today. If Mick gets interested I’ll carry on working on it; if he doesn’t look interested, I’ll drop it, leave it and say, ‘I’ll work on it and maybe introduce it later.'”[2]

Jagger countered, saying, “The country songs, like ‘Factory Girl’ or ‘Dear Doctor’ on Beggars Banquet were really pastiche. There’s a sense of humour in country music anyway, a way of looking at life in a humorous kind of way – and I think we were just acknowledging that element of the music. The ‘country’ songs we recorded later, like “Dead Flowers” on Sticky Fingers or “Far Away Eyes” on Some Girls are slightly different. The actual music is played completely straight, but it’s me who’s not going legit with the whole thing, because I think I’m a blues singer not a country singer.”[2]

The song has been performed live in 1990, 1997 and 2013. A live recording from the Steel Wheels/Urban Jungle Tour made its way onto the 1991 live album Flashpoint. The song was also featured during the 1997 Bridges to Babylon Tour It was played in Los Angeles on May 3, 2013 and then a version of the song with alternate lyrics called “Glastonbury Girl” was performed at the Glastonbury festival on June 29, 2013.

Emotional Rescue (song)

“Emotional Rescue” is a song by the English rock ‘n roll band, The Rolling Stones. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and is featured on their 1980 album Emotional Rescue.

Recorded between June and October 1979, “Emotional Rescue” is a disco-influenced number, somewhat similar to the band’s 1978 hit “Miss You”. The song is notable as one of the earliest songs by the group to show the growing rift between Jagger and Richards. Although Richards plays guitar and added backing vocals towards the end of this track, he is noted to not have liked the direction in which Jagger was trying to take the band with disco-like compositions, although this may have been exaggerated by the press and Richards’ hard-rock-oriented image.

Mick wrote the song on an electric piano and from the beginning it was sung in falsetto (similar to Marvin Gaye’s lead vocal on his 1977 hit “Got to Give It Up”). When the song was brought into the studio they kept the electric piano and falsetto lead. With Ronnie Wood on bass and Charlie Watts on drums they worked out the song. They then added the saxophone.[2] Bobby Keys plays the saxophone part.[3] Bass guitarist Bill Wyman plays synthesizer on the record, while Jagger and Ian Stewart play electric piano. Wyman’s synthesizer can be heard faintly during the verses on the right channel/speaker and plays a simple pattern of a few notes using a string-synth set up.

Jagger said the song was about “a girl who’s in some sort of manhood problems”, not that she was going crazy but she’s “just a little bit screwed up and he wants to be the one to help her out”.[2]

Released as the album’s lead single on 20 June 1980, “Emotional Rescue” was well received by some fans. Other fans of the Rolling Stones’ work took note of the change in direction and were disappointed by it. Reaching #9 on the UK Singles Chart and #3 in the US., “Emotional Rescue” became popular enough to feature on all of the band’s later compilation albums.

Despite touring extensively since the song’s release in 1980, the Stones had never performed the track in concert until May 3, 2013, when the Stones debuted the song in their set list with a slightly different arrangement, during the band’s first show of the 2013 leg of the 50 & Counting… tour, in Los Angeles, California.

Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)

“Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)” is the fourth track on The Rolling Stones’ 1973 album Goats Head Soup.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)”‘s lyrics relate two stories: one is a story of New York City police shooting a boy “right through the heart” because they mistook him for someone else, and the second of a ten-year-old girl who dies in an alley of a drug overdose. Neither of these events are known to be factual. However, it is certainly possible that Jagger incorporated into the lyrics some elements of a notorious police shooting that took place around the time the song was released.

In April of 1973 a ten-year-old boy named Clifford Glover was with his father when plainclothes police stopped them at gunpoint in Queens, in New York City, supposedly having mistaken the two for suspects in an armed robbery (the robbers were described as being about one foot taller than the boy). The boy and his father ran, fearing that they were about to be victims of a robbery. The police chased them and one officer shot the 10-year-old boy in the back, killing him. The bullet entered Glover’s lower back and emerged at the top of his chest (i.e., went through his heart). The case resulted in riots and a murder indictment against the officer, who was later acquitted in a jury trial.[1]

After telling the story of the police shooting the wrong person, Jagger sings,

You heartbreaker, with your .44, I want to tear your world apart.

The .44 magnum cartridge had been recently made famous by the 1971 film Dirty Harry, in which Harry Callahan uses “the most powerful handgun in the world” to cleanse the streets of crime. The lyrics complement the music, which Rolling Stone magazine described as “urban R&B”, due to its funk influence and prominent clavinet part (played by Billy Preston).[2]

“Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)” was first recorded in November and December 1972 before being re-recorded early the following summer. Jim Price arranged the song’s horns and played sax, while Chuck Findley took over for Price on trumpet. Mick Taylor played the lead guitar part (which features use of a wah-wah pedal, and a Leslie speaker), Richards played bass; Preston plays clavinet (also using a wah-wah), and RMI Electra Piano.[3] Released as the second single from Goats Head Soup in the US only (after the #1 hit “Angie”), it reached #15 in the US on the Billboard Hot 100 and has remained a staple on AOR and classic rock radio stations.

The song appeared on the American version of the compilation album Rewind (1971-1984).

It was featured in the series finale of the CBS drama Cold Case, the season 3 finale of Blue Bloods,[4] and the 2013 David O. Russell film American Hustle.[5]

Don’t Stop (The Rolling Stones song)

“Don’t Stop” is a single by rock and roll band The Rolling Stones featured on their 2002 compilation album Forty Licks.

Credited to singer Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards, “Don’t Stop” was largely the work of Jagger. Writing began during Jagger’s preparations for his 2001 album Goddess in the Doorway. At the time of release, he commented, “For me, doing a solo album or a Stones album is all the same, with one proviso: that when I’m writing for the Rolling Stones I don’t mind if the song sounds like the ones the Stones do, whereas if I’m writing, but not recording with the Rolling Stones, I don’t want the song to contain too many of the clichés that one associates with the Rolling Stones, so I try quite hard to avoid them. Before the release of Forty Licks, I wrote ‘Don’t Stop’ in the same period that I was writing the songs for my solo album, and I just put it to one side and said to myself, ‘This sounds very much like the Rolling Stones to me. It might be very useful in the coming months, but I’ll leave it for now and I won’t record it because I think it’s going to be better for the Stones.'”[1]

A straightforward rocker featuring a trademark opening riff from Richards, “Don’t Stop” tells of a rough love affair between the singer and his lover:

“The way you bit my lip and you drew first blood, It warmed my cold, cold heart; And you wrote your name right on my back, Boy, your nails were sharp”

“Well I’m losing you, I know your heart is miles away; There’s a whisper there where once there was a storm; And all that’s left is that image that I’ve filed away, And some memories have tattered as they’ve torn”

Dear Doctor (song)

“Dear Doctor” is a song by English rock and roll band the Rolling Stones featured on their 1968 album Beggars Banquet.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Dear Doctor” is a country song with blues inflections. It is a good example of the acoustic guitar-based compositions that has earned Beggars Banquet its reputation as the Rolling Stones’ “return to form”. Bill Janovitz says in his review of the song, “With all acoustic instruments — guitar, tack piano, 12-string, harmonica, tambourine, and upright bass — …the band manages to sound authentically old-time and primitive, with Mick Jagger employing the fake-American hick accent that he would continue to mine in future blues and country numbers throughout the Stones’ career.”[1]

On the Rolling Stones’ experiments with country, Jagger said in 2003, “The country songs, like ‘Factory Girl’ or ‘Dear Doctor’, on Beggars Banquet were really pastiche. There’s a sense of humour in country music anyway, a way of looking at life in a humorous kind of way – and I think we were just acknowledging that element of the music.”

The song tells the story of a young man discovering his fiancee has abandoned him on the day they are to be wed, to his relief;

“ I was tremblin, as I put on my jacket, It had creases as sharp as a knife; I put the ring in my pocket, But there was a note, And my heart it jumped into my mouth  ”

“It read, ‘Darlin’, I’m sorry to hurt you. But I have no courage to speak to your face. But I’m down in Virginia with your cousin Lou, There be no wedding today’”

Janovitz concludes, “Jagger may be poking fun a little, but he could not nail the parlance of the characters so precisely if he had not studied it closely as a fan of the music… In a sense, they have been musicologists, interpreting musical forms that were in danger of dying out. The raw quality of ‘Dear Doctor’ and the rest of the album was a welcoming sound to the ears of most Stones fans losing patience with their experimentation on Their Satanic Majesties Request.”[1]

“Dear Doctor” was recorded at London’s Olympic Sound Studios between 13 and 21 May 1968. Despite its appearance on one of the Rolling Stones’ more well-known albums, “Dear Doctor” has never been performed live by the band. It appears on the compilation album Slow Rollers.[2]

Dandelion (song)

“Dandelion” is a song by the English rock ‘n roll band The Rolling Stones, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, and first released as a B-side to “We Love You” in August 1967. An apparently lighthearted song (with references to the English children’s game of using the seedheads of dandelions as clocks) albeit with an undertone of wistfulness, it reached #14 in the United States, and effectively became the A-side there (as the edgier “We Love You” disappointed at #50 on US charts). This is reflected in “Dandelion” appearing on both the US and United Kingdom versions of Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2) in 1969, while “We Love You” appeared only on the UK version.

The first demo version of “Dandelion” was recorded in November 1966; it was originally titled “Sometimes Happy, Sometimes Blue”, had different lyrics, and was sung and played by Keith Richards. On the released version, Mick Jagger sang lead vocals.

The Rolling Stones have never performed “Dandelion” live;[1] nonetheless it has been included on several compilations, including Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2), More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies), Singles Collection: The London Years, and Rolled Gold+: The Very Best of the Rolling Stones.

The original single releases had a faded-in coda consisting of a short piano section from the A-side, “We Love You”; the coda is missing on most compilation albums, which include the song in a 3:32 edit, but it may be heard, for example, on Singles Collection: The London Years.

 

Dancing with Mr. D

“Dancing with Mr. D.” is the opening track of rock and roll band The Rolling Stones’ 1973 album Goats Head Soup.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Dancing with Mr. D.” is a brooding rocker in line with much of the Stones’ funk inspired recordings from the Goats Head Soup era. The song opens with a riff by Richards prominently repeated throughout the song. Jagger’s lyrics allude to either dalliance with a succubus or Death;

Down in the graveyard where we have our tryst,

The air smells sweet, the air smells sick;

He never smiles, his mouth merely twists,

The breath in my lungs feels clinging and thick;

But I know his name, he’s called Mr. D,

And one of these days, he’s going to set you free

The song would best serve as an introduction to the Stones’ studio-based sound of the mid-1970s after the sprawling epic Exile on Main St. Recording began at Dynamic Sound Studios in Kingston, Jamaica and would continue at Village Recorders in Los Angeles and Island Recording Studios in London. Billy Preston, who had contributed on a few songs with the Stones in the past, would become a heavy collaborator over the next few albums and here performs clavinet. Nicky Hopkins highlights with pianos throughout while Rebop Kwaku Baah and Pascal perform percussion. Mick Taylor performs electric slide guitar as well as bass while Charlie Watts performs drums.

“Dancing with Mr. D.” has been performed by the Stones only on their 1973 tour of Europe. It served as the B-side to album mate “Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)”.

Honky Tonk Women

“Honky Tonk Women” is a 1969 hit song by The Rolling Stones. Released as a single only release (although a country version was included on “Let It Bleed”), on 4 July 1969 in the United Kingdom and a week later in the United States, it topped the charts in both nations.[3]

The song was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards while on holiday in Brazil from late December 1968 to early January 1969, inspired by Brazilian “caipiras” (inhabitants of rural, remote areas of parts of Brazil) at the ranch where Jagger and Richards were staying in Matão, São Paulo.[4] Two versions of the song were recorded by the band: the familiar hit which appeared on the 45 single and their collection of late 1960s singles, Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2); and a honky-tonk version entitled “Country Honk” with slightly different lyrics, which appeared on Let It Bleed (1969).
Thematically, a “honky tonk woman” refers to a dancing girl in a western bar who may work as a prostitute; the setting for the narrative in the first verse of the blues version is Memphis, Tennessee, while “Country Honk” sets the first verse in Jackson, Mississippi.[5]
I met a gin soaked bar-room queen in Memphis
I’m sittin’ in a bar, tippin’ a jar in Jackson

The band initially recorded the track called “Country Honk”, in London in early March 1969. Brian Jones was present during these sessions and may have played on the first handful of takes and demos. It was his last recording session with the band.[6][7] The song was transformed into the familiar electric, riff-based hit single “Honky Tonk Women” sometime in the spring of 1969, prior to Mick Taylor’s joining the group.[2] In an interview in the magazine Crawdaddy!, Richards credits Taylor for influencing the track: “… the song was originally written as a real Hank Williams/Jimmie Rodgers/1930s country song. And it got turned around to this other thing by Mick Taylor, who got into a completely different feel, throwing it off the wall another way.”[8] However, in 1979 Taylor recalled it this way: “I definitely added something to Honky Tonk Women, but it was more or less complete by the time I arrived and did my overdubs.”[9]

“Honky Tonk Women” is distinctive as it opens not with a guitar riff, but with a beat played on a cowbell. The Rolling Stones’ producer Jimmy Miller performed the cowbell for the recording.
The concert rendition of “Honky Tonk Women” on Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! (1970) differs significantly from the studio hit, with a markedly dissimilar guitar introduction and the first appearance on vinyl of an entirely different second verse.

Connection (The Rolling Stones song)

“Connection” is a song by British rock and roll band The Rolling Stones, featured on their 1967 album Between the Buttons. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (but mostly Richards), features vocals by both of them and is said to be about the long hours the band spent in airports. The lyrics contain much rhyming based on the word connection. The lyrics also reflect very heavily the pressures the band was under by 1967:

My bags they get a very close inspection, I wonder why it is that they suspect ’em, They’re dying to add me to their collection, And I don’t know, If they’ll let me go

The song was written before Jagger, Richards and fellow Rolling Stone Brian Jones were arrested by the police for drugs.

Although it was never released as a single, it is a popular live song. The song itself is built on a very simple chord progression featuring a repetitive drum pattern, Chuck Berry-like lead guitar from Richards, the piano of Jack Nitzsche, tambourine and organ pedals by multi-instrumentalist Jones, and bass by Wyman. Jagger, Jones, and Wyman later overdubbed handclaps. Jagger said in 1967, “That’s me beating my hands on the bass drum.”

Coming Down Again

“Coming Down Again” is a song by The Rolling Stones featured on their 1973 album Goats Head Soup. It is sung as a duet by Keith Richards and Mick Jagger.

Credited to Jagger/Richards, “Coming Down Again” is largely the work of Richards, who went as far as to say, “Coming Down Again’ is my song,” at the time of its release. A slower ballad similar in mood to another track on the album, “Angie”, the lyrics tell of Richards’ relationship with then-girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, who had chosen to abandon her romantic liaison with his friend and bandmate Brian Jones in favour of one with Richards.[1]

“ Share your thoughts, there’s nothing you can hide; She was dying to survive;

I was caught, oh, taken for a ride; She was showing no surprise ”

“Slipped my tongue in someone else’s pie; Tasting better ev’ry time;

He turned green and tried to make me cry; Being hungry, it ain’t no crime ”

The song opens with Stones recording veteran Nicky Hopkins playing keyboards front and center alongside a fluid, prominent bassline performed by Mick Taylor. Guitars are performed by Richards, who uses the wah-wah pedal for much of the song (an effect used often on Goats Head Soup), as well as Leslie speakers. Charlie Watts performs a “trademark start-stop drum arrangement… that by now had become a familiar device.”[2] Bobby Keys performs a saxophone solo near the middle of the song. The session guitarist Miles Miller is thought to have laid down guitar lines that didn’t make it onto the final album version. Jagger gives support to Richards on backing vocals.

Recorded in Kingston’s Dynamic Sound Studios in November and December, 1972, “Coming Down Again” is regarded as one of Richards’ best lead vocal performances.[2] Despite some popularity, Richards has never performed the song live on tour with the Rolling Stones.

Citadel (song)

“Citadel” is a song by English rock band The Rolling Stones, released as the second track on their 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties Request.

Driven by a guitar riff played by Keith Richards, the song is notably harder, with a stronger guitar presence, than other songs on the psychedelic album.

The chorus refers to actress Candy Darling and her friend Taffy, who The Rolling Stones had previously met at the Hotel Albert in New York City. According to Darling:

“We met them in the Hotel Albert. We were on the floor above them and we dangled a bunch of grapes down on a string outside their window. You see, the Citadel is New York and the song is a message to us — Taffy and me.” [1]

According to bassist Bill Wyman, the song had the working title “After Five”.

It has been covered by many alternative and punk bands including British punk group The Damned, British post-punkers The Comsat Angels, and American alternative rock band Redd Kross.

Serbian rock band Električni Orgazam covered the song on their cover album Les Chansones Populaires.

Casino Boogie

“Casino Boogie” is a song by British band The Rolling Stones, from their 1972 album, Exile on Main St. Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it was recorded at Villa Nellcote, Richards’ home in the South of France. The song has a straightforward blues rhythm which produces the “boogie” feel. Richards’ prominent backing vocals and Bobby Keys’ saxophone solo are other features of the track.

Struggling to write lyrics for the song, Jagger wrote small, random phrases on torn pieces of paper. These were mixed up and then picked out one-by-one by the band members. The order of the lyrics on the record is the same order in which they were picked. The song was written in open G tuning with the capo at the second fret putting it into A. It has the cool defining opening riff which the song never revisits. After the last verse, the instrumental outro features a lengthy guitar solo from Mick Taylor till the fade out.

“Casino Boogie” was not released as a single and has never been played live by the Stones.[1] It is also a notable example of Richards’ dominant influence on the Stones’ musical direction during the Exile sessions.[citation needed]

Can’t You Hear Me Knocking

“Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” is a song by English rock band The Rolling Stones from their 1971 album Sticky Fingers. The song is over seven minutes long, and begins with a Keith Richards open-G tuned guitar intro. At two minutes and forty-three seconds, an instrumental break begins, with Rocky Dijon on congas; tenor saxophonist Bobby Keys performs an extended saxophone solo over the guitar work of Richards and Mick Taylor, punctuated by the organ work of Billy Preston. At 4:40 Taylor takes over from Keys and carries the song to its finish with a lengthy guitar solo.[1]

Brown Sugar (The Rolling Stones song)

“Brown Sugar” is a song by The Rolling Stones. It is the opening track and lead single from their 1971 album Sticky Fingers. Rolling Stone magazine ranked it No. 495 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and at No. 5 on their list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time.[6]

Though credited, like most of their compositions, to the singer/guitarist pair of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the song was primarily the work of Jagger, who wrote it sometime during the filming of Ned Kelly in 1969.[7] Originally recorded over a three-day period at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Muscle Shoals, Alabama from 2–4 December 1969, the song was not released until over a year later due to legal wranglings with the band’s former label, though at the request of guitarist Mick Taylor, they debuted the number live during the infamous concert at Altamont on 6 December. The song was written by Jagger with Marsha Hunt in mind; Hunt was Jagger’s secret girlfriend and mother of his first child Karis. It is also claimed it was written with Claudia Lennear in mind. Lennear made this claim on BBC’s Radio 4 (25 February 2014, Today), saying that it was written with her in mind because at the time when it was written, Mick Jagger used to hang around with her.

In the documentary film Gimme Shelter (1970), an alternative mix of the song is played back to the band while they relax in a hotel in Alabama.

The song, with its prominent blues-rock riffs, dual horn/guitar instrumental break, and danceable rock rhythms, is representative of the Stones’ definitive middle period and the tough, bluesy hard-rock most often associated with the group.[citation needed] In the liner notes to the 1993 compilation album Jump Back, Jagger says, “The lyric was all to do with the dual combination of drugs and girls. This song was a very instant thing, a definite high point.” The song is in compound AABA form.[8]

In the Rolling Stone interview (14 December 1995, RS 723) with Jagger, he spoke at length about the song, its inspiration and success — including claiming credit for writing the lyrics. He attributed the success of the song to a “good groove”. After noting that the lyrics could mean so many lewd subjects, he again noted that the combination of those subjects, the lyrical ambiguity was partially why the song was considered successful. He noted, “That makes it… the whole mess thrown in. God knows what I’m on about on that song. It’s such a mishmash. All the nasty subjects in one go… I never would write that song now.” When Jann Wenner asked him why, Jagger replied, “I would probably censor myself. I’d think, ‘Oh God, I can’t. I’ve got to stop. I can’t just write raw like that.'”[9]

The lyrical subject matter has often been a point of interest and controversy. Described by rock critic Robert Christgau as “a rocker so compelling that it discourages exegesis”,[10] “Brown Sugar”‘s popularity indeed often overshadowed its scandalous lyrics, which were essentially a pastiche of a number of taboo subjects, including slavery, interracial sex, cunnilingus, and less distinctly, sadomasochism, lost virginity, rape, and heroin.[11]

An alternative version was recorded on 18 December 1970, at Olympic Studios in London, after (or during) a birthday party for Richards. It features appearances by Al Kooper on piano, and Eric Clapton on slide guitar. Richards considered releasing this version on Sticky Fingers, mostly for its more spontaneous atmosphere, but decided on the original.[12] The alternative version, which had previously been available only on bootleg recordings, was released in June 2015 on the Deluxe and Super Deluxe editions of the reissued Sticky Fingers album.

Blue Turns to Grey

“Blue Turns to Grey” is a song that was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. The song first appeared in February 1965 when both Dick and Dee Dee and The Mighty Avengers released versions of it as singles. Another version was released shortly thereafter by Tracey Dey on Amy Records. On Dey’s 45 record, the label credits the song to “K. Richard-A. Oldham” — Oldham being the surname of the Rolling Stones’ then-manager/producer Andrew Loog Oldham.[1] It was released by The Rolling Stones on their 1965 album December’s Children (And Everybody’s) later that year.

It became a hit (peak #15) in the UK when remade by Cliff Richard and the Shadows[2][3] in 1966 (b/w “Somebody Loses” (Tepper/Bennett), released 18 March 1966).

Flamin’ Groovies released a version of the song on their 1978 album, Flamin’ Groovies Now![4]

Black Limousine

“Black Limousine” is a song by The Rolling Stones featured on their 1981 album Tattoo You.

“Black Limousine” is one of the few credited to Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood (though incidentally one of two featured on Tattoo You). “Black Limousine” is a hard blues number (described as “fast mid-tempo blues of no specific nature”[1] by Jagger) which heavily hearkens back to the Rolling Stones’ earliest recordings from their ABCKO/London albums. Using a heavy bellow, Jagger delivers his lines and spells out the growing rifts in an aging romance:

“    We used to shine, shine, shine, shine, Say what a pair, say what a team/We used to ride, ride, ride, ride, In a long black limousine/Those dreams are gone baby, Locked away and never seen/Well now look at your face now baby, Look at you and look at me.    ”

On the lyrics, Richards said in 1981, “That song does have a more generous view of relationships with women… I guess, because the women in our lives at the moment have made a change in our attitudes toward it. I guess because everything that comes out from the Stones is just as it comes out… That’s how we used to feel about it, and that’s how we feel about it now. This is purely a guess… but it seems logical that the people you’re with are the ones who are gonna influence you most, whether you intend it or not. Mick might intend to sit down and write a real Stones song – you know, ‘Blechhh! You cruddy piece of shit, you dirty old scrub box!’ But obviously, that’s not the way he’s feeling now. It’s not the way I’m feeling now.”[1]

On the music, Wood said in 2003, “‘Black Limousine’ came about from a slide guitar riff that was inspired in part by some Hop Wilson licks from a record that I once owned… And there was another guy called Big Moose, who I’ve never heard of before or since… He was an old slide guitar guy who had one particular lick that he would bring in every now and again. I thought, ‘That’s really good, I’m going to apply that’ – and so subconsciously I wrote the whole song around that one little lick, building on it, resolving it and taking it round again… That was something that clicked musically straight away with the guitars and drums and Mick, and then we immediately got into sparring about the lyrics for it, since it was obviously crying out for some words… Mick’s got his own style and that’s why I let him interpret it in his own way…”[2]

Bitch (The Rolling Stones song)

“Bitch” is a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones from their 1971 album Sticky Fingers, first released one week before the album as the b-side to its advance single, “Brown Sugar.”[1] Despite not being used as an official single by itself, the tune has garnered major airplay from classic rock radio stations. With a bombastic use of horns, the track is not about a specific woman, but it instead focuses on how, in general, “love is a bitch”.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “Bitch” was recorded in October 1970 at London’s Olympic Studios, and at Stargroves utilising the Rolling Stones Mobile studio.[2]

Biggest Mistake

“Biggest Mistake” is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 2005 album A Bigger Bang. It was released on 21 August 2006 as the third single from the album, and reached number 51 in the UK.

Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the track is a pop song with a strongly acoustic guitar-based arrangement and lyrics that tell the story of an older man who falls in love but then walks out on his partner. It could possibly be about the failed relationship between Jagger and model Jerry Hall. Beginning in late July, the song received extensive radio airplay, particularly on BBC Radio 2, where it remained on the A-Playlist for four weeks.

Before They Make Me Run

“Before They Make Me Run” is a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones, featured on their 1978 album Some Girls.

Written by guitarist Keith Richards, the song is a response to his arrest for heroin possession in Toronto in February 1977. The criminal charges and prospect of a prison sentence loomed over the Some Girls recording sessions and endangered the future of the Rolling Stones.[2]

In the lyrics, Richards reflects unapologetically on his lifestyle up to that point. The line “it’s another goodbye to another good friend” in the first verse can be interpreted as referring to Gram Parsons, Richards’s close friend who died in 1973 from a drug overdose,[2] and/or to heroin itself: Richards had sought medical treatment for heroin addiction following his arrest in Toronto, and his resolution to overcome his addiction would be a significant factor in his upcoming trial.[3]

Richards recorded the song in five days without sleeping. Originally entitled “Rotten Roll”, the song was recorded in a Paris studio in March 1978 during one of Mick Jagger’s absences from the Some Girls sessions.[4] The completed track – “a high-energy rock & roller”[4] – features Richards on lead vocals, acoustic and electric guitars and bass; Ronnie Wood on pedal steel guitar, slide guitar and backing vocals, Charlie Watts on drums, and Jagger on backing vocals.[5]

Richards first performed the song in concert on the New Barbarians’ tour of North America in 1979; it wasn’t until the Steel Wheels Tour in 1989 that it entered the Rolling Stones’ concert repertoire.[6] Like “Happy”, the song has become one of Richards’ “signature tunes”, performed on most Rolling Stones tours since 1989; he also played it on the X-Pensive Winos’ 1992-93 tours promoting his album Main Offender.[6]

Live performances of the song are included in the Stones’ 2003 Four Flicks DVD set and in the 2013 concert film Sweet Summer Sun: Hyde Park Live.

Steve Earle has also performed the song in concert and has recorded it as part of a split single with the Supersuckers.[7] Great Lake Swimmers covered the song on the 2011 album Paint it Black: An Alt-Country Tribute to the Rolling Stones.

Beast of Burden (song)

“Beast of Burden” is a song by English rock band The Rolling Stones, featured on the 1978 album Some Girls. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song #435 on their list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” and #433 on the 500 Greatest Rock and Roll Songs of All Time.

A “beast of burden” is an animal, usually domesticated, that labors for the benefit of man, such as an ox or horse. The music and some lyrics were primarily written by Keith Richards. In the liner notes to the 1993 compilation disc Jump Back, Richards said Beast of Burden “was another one where Mick (Jagger) just filled in the verses. With the Stones, you take a long song, play it and see if there are any takers. Sometimes they ignore it, sometimes they grab it and record it. After all the faster numbers of Some Girls, everybody settled down and enjoyed the slow one.”

In those same notes, Jagger says, “Lyrically, this wasn’t particularly heartfelt in a personal way. It’s a soul begging song, an attitude song. It was one of those where you get one melodic lick, break it down and work it up; there are two parts here which are basically the same.” The song can be seen as allegorical, with Richards saying in 2003, “When I returned to the fold after closing down the laboratory [referring to his drug problems throughout the 1970s], I came back into the studio with Mick… to say, ‘Thanks, man, for shouldering the burden’ – that’s why I wrote “Beast of Burden” for him, I realise in retrospect.”

“Beast of Burden” was recorded from October–December 1977. Although basic lyrics were written before the Stones entered the studio, many of the lyrics on the recording were improvised by Jagger to fit with the smooth running guitars of Richards and Ronnie Wood. Characteristically, Richards and Wood trade off rolling, fluid licks. Neither is really playing lead or rhythm guitar, they both slip in and out, one playing high while the other is low. The song is another famed Some Girls song that features each band member playing his respective instrument without any outside performers; both Richards and Wood play acoustic and electric guitars, with Wood performing the solo.[1]

Back Street Girl

“Backstreet Girl” is a song by British rock and roll band The Rolling Stones written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. It first appeared on the UK version of their 1967 album Between the Buttons but was not included on the US version. It was first released in the US on the 1967 album Flowers.[1]

The song showcases Brian Jones, playing vibraphone and Rolling Stones contributor Jack Nitzsche on the harpsichord. Accordion was played by Nick de Caro.[2]

Anybody Seen My Baby?

“Anybody Seen My Baby?” is a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones featured on their 1997 album Bridges to Babylon.

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the song also carries writing credits for k.d. lang and Ben Mink.[1] The song is known for its chorus, which sounds strikingly similar to lang’s 1992 hit song “Constant Craving”. Jagger and Richards claimed to have never heard the song before, only having discovered the similarity prior to the song’s release. As Richards writes in his autobiography Life, “My daughter Angela and her friend were at Redlands and I was playing the record and they start singing this totally different song over it. They were hearing K.D. Lang’s ‘Constant Craving.’ It was Angela and her friend that copped it.”[2] The two gave Lang credit, along with her co-writer Mink, to avoid any lawsuits. Afterwards, Lang said she was “completely honored and flattered” by receiving the songwriting credit.[3][4]

“Anybody Seen My Baby?” is a typical song from the Bridges to Babylon-era Stones. It features wide-ranging inspirations, including sampling of hip-hop artist Biz Markie, making it one of the few songs by The Rolling Stones to include sampling (Bridges to Babylon is the only Rolling Stones album to include sampling). Bass and keyboards on the song is performed by Jamie Muhoberac while Waddy Wachtel performs acoustic guitar. The song has a distinctive R&B feel, driven by Muhoberac’s bass. Jagger, Richards, and Wachtel perform electric guitars.

Coincidentally, “Has Anybody Seen My Baby” is reported to have been the title of a song written and recorded by Brian Jones after leaving the Rolling Stones.[5]

The song was a worldwide hit in 1997, reaching Top 20 in Europe, #1 on Canada’s Singles and Rock charts and #3 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Tracks.[citation needed] The video is perhaps best remembered for featuring Angelina Jolie.[6] She appears as a stripper who leaves mid-performance to wander New York City. “Anybody Seen My Baby?” would go on to be the only track from Bridges to Babylon to appear on the Stones’ 2002 career retrospective Forty Licks.

It was performed live on most 1997/98 concerts and once in 2016.

Almost Hear You Sigh

“Almost Hear You Sigh” is a Grammy-nominated song by The Rolling Stones from their 1989 album Steel Wheels.

Written by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Steve Jordan, the song was first written and recorded for possible inclusion on Keith Richards’ first solo album Talk is Cheap. A year or so later Richards played the track for Chris Kimsey and Jagger while recording in Montserrat from March through June for the Steel Wheels sessions. Jordan’s writing credit stems from his work with Richards in 1987 and 1988.

Jagger changed some of the lyrics as evidenced in comparison to popular bootlegs of the Richards-Jordan collaboration, but the mood and melody of the song remain in the Rolling Stones track. Charlie Watts adds a thumping bass march to the later song where Richards’ sharp, slashing, trademark rhythm guitar is the main percussion on the slightly slower, meandering jam that extended to ten minutes with uncredited piano playing.

All Down the Line

“All Down the Line” is a song by rock band The Rolling Stones featured on their 1972 album Exile on Main St.. Although at one point slated to be the lead single from the album,[1] it was ultimately released as a single as the b-side of “Happy.”

Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, “All Down the Line” is a straight ahead electric rock song which opens side four of Exile on Main St.. An acoustic version of the song was recorded in 1969 during the early sessions of what would become Sticky Fingers.[2] Recording took place at Olympic Sound Studios in London and Sunset Sound Studios in Los Angeles.

Featured on the recording are Jagger on lead vocals and backing vocals with Richards and Kathi McDonald. Bill Wyman performs electric bass while Bill Plummer performs acoustic standup bass. Mick Taylor performs the electric slide guitar while Richards performs electric rhythm guitar. With Charlie Watts on drums, producer Jimmy Miller performs maracas. Bobby Keys and Jim Price lend support on saxophone and trumpet and trombone, respectively.[3] Nicky Hopkins performs on piano.

The Rolling Stones famously gave a Los Angeles radio station a demo of “All Down the Line” to play while they drove around and listened to it on the radio,[3][1] but “All Down the Line”‘s biggest claim to fame may be its near constant appearance on the Rolling Stones’ tours since the release of Exile.[citation needed]

After the release of Exile on Main St., Allen Klein sued the Rolling Stones for breach of settlement because “All Down the Line” and four other songs on the album were composed while Jagger and Richards were under contract with his company, ABKCO. ABKCO acquired publishing rights to the songs, giving it a share of the royalties from Exile on Main St., and was able to publish another album of previously released Rolling Stones songs, More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies).[4]

All About You (The Rolling Stones song)

“All About You” is a song by The Rolling Stones featured as the closing track to their 1980 album Emotional Rescue. It is sung by guitarist Keith Richards.

Credited to the writing team of Mick Jagger and Richards, “All About You” is solely the work of Richards. The song is a slow bittersweet ballad that has been interpreted as a final comment on the Anita Pallenberg romance that began in 1967 and ended in 1979 when Richards met his future wife model Patti Hansen. Richards’ lyrics and singing express mixed feelings of attachment and revulsion; however, the song may also be interpreted as an early sign of the fracturing relationship between Richards and Jagger, the longtime leaders of the band. Richards had “cleaned up” after his 1977 Toronto heroin bust and wanted to take more responsibility back from Jagger. The lead singer and businessman had kept the band rolling through the worst period of Richards’ excesses in the 70s, and in several interviews, Richards stated he immediately encountered resistance from Jagger regarding his new interest in taking some of the front man’s burden.[1]

Richards said in 2002, “I went through a very tough thing in the early ’80s with Mick. So you get some songs like ‘All About You,’ to name just one. There’s more on some of the Expensive Winos records.” Saxophonist Bobby Keys said of the song, “It had a little bit of sentimental input there about his feelings for Mick at the time. Just listen to the lyrics”. In the song, Richards bemoans a relationship he’s in with harsh lyrics:

“   Well if you call this a life, Why must I spend mine with you? If the show must go on, Let it go on without you.   ”

“  Though the laughs may be cheap, That’s just ’cause the joke’s about you/I’m so sick and tired, Of hanging around with dogs like you.  ”

On the writing, Richards said, “That song was hanging around for three years. After researching to make sure it wasn’t somebody else who wrote it, I finally decided that it must have been me”. Recording took place between January and February 1979 during the earliest recordings made for Emotional Rescue. A sign of his closeness to the song, Richards performs bass, piano, electric guitar, and backing vocals with Ronnie Wood. Keys performs the song’s distinctive saxophone and Charlie Watts performs drums.

“All About You” was performed by Richards during the 1997-1998 Bridges to Babylon Tour and the 1999 No Security Tour.

2120 South Michigan Avenue

“2120 South Michigan Avenue” is an original instrumental by the Rolling Stones recorded for their second EP Five by Five. It was also released on their second US album 12 X 5 in 1964. Composer credit goes to Nanker Phelge, a title giving credit equally to all members of the band. In the book Rolling with the Stones, Bill Wyman recalls that the composition process started with him playing a bass riff and that the others followed on jamming.[1]

The title refers to the address of the offices and recording studios of Chess Records and Checker Records in Chicago where the five songs for the EP were recorded in June 1964.[2]

AllMusic reviewer Richie Unterberger described the song as “a great groovin’ original blues-rock jam”.[3] The song was originally released at just over two minutes in length, fading early for lack of time available on a conventional EP in 1964. A full length (3:38 minute) version appears on the 1964 West German Decca LP Around And Around, and the 2002 CD re-release of 12 X 5.[3] There is also a rarer second take which has a rougher, more blues-based sound than the better known Five by Five rock-groove version.[4] This version, with its short but distinctive tremolo guitar riff, was under consideration as the title track of an eventually unreleased 1964 blues album.[5]

In 1965, Sly Stone released a single, Buttermilk that copied the 2120 South Michigan Avenue riff and overall sound. In 2011, George Thorogood and the Destroyers released an album called 2120 South Michigan Ave., which includes a cover of this song as well as covers of other Chess Records artists.

Washington DC DJ Cerphe Colwell at WHFS would play it as his signature song at the end of his daily broadcast in the 1970s.

2000 Light Years from Home

“2000 Light Years from Home” is a song from The Rolling Stones’ 1967 psychedelic rock album Their Satanic Majesties Request.[1] Written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, it also appeared as the B-side to the American single “She’s a Rainbow”, and charted as a single in Germany. Jagger reportedly wrote the lyrics in Brixton prison following his conviction on drug charges in June 1967.[2] The song was recorded by the band inside Olympic Studios during July 1967. The working title of the instrumental backing was “Toffee Apple”. The prominent string part is played by Brian Jones on Mellotron.

The number was regularly featured during the Stones’ 1989-90 Steel Wheels/Urban Jungle Tours; until 1997, when “She’s a Rainbow” was also added to the band’s stage repertoire, it was the only track from Satanic Majesties that the band had performed in concert.

After disappearing from setlists completely for 23 years, “2000 Light Years from Home” was performed on 29 June 2013 at Glastonbury Festival in the United Kingdom.

The song is used in the film Men in Black 3.

 

100 Years Ago

“100 Years Ago” is a song by the Rolling Stones featured on their 1973 album Goats Head Soup.

Credited to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, guitarist Mick Taylor said at the time of its release, “Some of the songs we used (for the album) were pretty old. ‘100 Years Ago’ was one that Mick [Jagger] had written two years ago and which we hadn’t really got around to using before.”[1] The song is described by Tom Maginnis in his review as having a, “wistful air with a country lilt… before making several tempo shifts into a funky, sped-up groove…”[2] The song’s lyrics see Jagger reflect on aging;

Now all my friends is wearing worried smiles, Living out a dream of what they was; Don’t you think it’s sometimes wise not to grow up?

Went out walkin’ through the wood the other day; Can’t you see the furrows in my forehead? What tender days, we had no secrets hid away; Now it seems about a hundred years ago

The song then veers into a distinctive breakdown, slowing considerably before Jagger begins singing a verse in a noticeable drawl, before speeding back-up and turning into a funk jam of sorts.[2]

Recording took place at Kingston’s Dynamic Sound Studios in November and December, 1972, with a final mix conducted in June 1973. Jagger performs lead vocals and is accompanied by Taylor on backing. Taylor performs the song’s guitars while Keith Richards and Charlie Watts perform bass and drums, respectively. Nicky Hopkins provides piano while Billy Preston performs clavinet.[3]

“100 Years Ago” was only played on the first two performances of European Tour of 1973, and has not been performed live since.[citation needed]

Scroll To Top