eurohitlist.eu

Lionsong

“Lionsong” is the second song by Icelandic singer and musician Björk from her ninth studio album, Vulnicura. It was written and composed by Björk and features beats by Venezuelan musician Arca, who co-produced the track with her.

“Lionsong” was released as a promotional single to radio stations in some territories, including the US, by One Little Indian Records in late 2015 and received limited airplay in a shortened radio version.[1] Vulnicura saw no official commercial singles, digital or physical, the first for a Björk studio album, though several versions of “Lionsong” exist due to the various supplementary projects that accompanied the original Vulnicura album.

Stonemilker

“Stonemilker” is a song recorded by Icelandic singer/songwriter Björk for her ninth studio album, Vulnicura, in 2015. It was written and produced by Björk with beats by Venezuelan musician Arca. “Stonemilker” is Vulnicura’s opening track, and the first of a six-part narrative that details the devastating end of Björk’s relationship to American contemporary artist Matthew Barney. Björk wrote the lyrics on the same Icelandic beach where the innovative 360-degree music video was later shot.

“Stonemilker” was released as a promotional single in some territories in 2015 and received very limited airplay in a shorted radio edit. Unlike all of her previous studio albums, Vulnicura saw no commercially released singles. Despite this fact, several versions of the song have been released across a variety of different media.

The Comet Song

“The Comet Song” is a song by Icelandic artist Björk, written by herself and long-time friend and collaborator Sjón as the title theme of the 2010 movie Moomins and the Comet Chase.[3][4] The song is released as a charity single and all the benefits are donated to the victims of the 2010 Pakistan floods.[5][6]

Björk had previously declared to be a big fan of Moomins, and had worn clothes featuring characters from the series on several occasions.[7]

Mutual Core

“Mutual Core” is a song recorded by Icelandic singer Björk for her eighth studio album Biophilia (2011). It was written and produced by Björk herself, while programming and beats were made in collaboration with Matthew Herbert and the English dubstep band 16bit. “Mutual Core” is an uptempo experimental song. Its music includes Pipe organ, electronica-tinged sounds and features the Choir Graduale Nobili, the choir featured on Biophilia. The song’s lyrics are a metaphor for human relationships, compared to the structure of the Earth and Plate tectonics. The song was well received by contemporary music critics, who praised its production and beats, moreover appreciating Björk’s voice on the track.

As with all the songs on Biophilia, an app was made for the song, which features a video game in which the player have to move geological layers as an accordion to play chords. Though the song wasn’t released as a single, a music video was produced, directed by Andrew Thomas Huang. The video was critically applauded and received further attention when it got projected for one month in Times Square in 2013, and then across the 7 continents. Björk promoted the song by performing it throughout her Biophilia Tour.

Three remixes by Matthew Herbert, 16bit and These New Puritans were released as part of Biophilia Remix Series. The Matthew Herbert’s and the These New Puritans remixes were later included on bastards (2012). In July 2012, the online music store Beatport announced a fan contest in which “Mutual Core” had to be remixed, to be released afterwards on a remix package.

Virus (Björk song)

“Virus” is a song by Icelandic artist Björk released as the third single from the album Biophilia. Each song in the album features a theme related to nature. In “Virus”, Björk explores “fatal relationships” such as the one between a virus and a cell, as Björk explained in an interview: “It’s a kind of a love story between a virus and a cell. And of course the virus loves the cell so much that it destroys it.”[1]

“Virus” features a gameleste (a hybrid between a celesta and a gamelan that can be controlled by midi and that was also used in “Crystalline”, built exclusively for these songs) base that plays through the whole song. The gameleste represents the ‘virus’ that continues multiplying until it takes control at the end of the song.[2] Also, Manu Delago plays hang drum.[3] Since Björk wanted the album to break the typical 4/4 time signature,[4] “Virus” has a time signature of 6/4.

The lyrics to “Virus” talk about “dangerous relationships”, symbiotic relationships in which one organism is parasite for the other and takes a benefit, even changing the other’s behaviour. This fact is used as a metaphor between ‘love’ and ‘parasiting’.[2] Björk took inspitation from a McGraw-Hill educative video about mind-controlling parasites[5] and from candidiasis, illness that she suffered:[6]

I’d been fighting this candida issue in my throat and I had to really change my diet and use different medication and it sort of seems to pop up and its kinda hilarious. It’s like I have this new neighbour that I have to sort of learn to live with. And obviously you know this fungus is inside all of us and it’s never about eliminating it. You have to kind of just live with it.

Crystalline (song)

“Crystalline” is a song by Icelandic artist Björk, released as the lead single from her eighth album Biophilia. The song was released as a single on June 28, 2011[2][3] accompanied by an iPad app developed exclusively for the song. It was afterward released as part of The Crystalline Series alongside the second single from the album, “Cosmogony”.[4]

Moon (Björk song)

“Moon” is a song by Icelandic artist Björk. It is the first track on her album Biophilia and was released as the fourth and final single before the release of the album. Each song in the album features a theme related to nature. In “Moon”, Björk explores the lunar cycles and the effect they have on Earth.

The song “Moon” is based on four different sequences played by four different harpists: Zeena Parkins, Shelley Burgon, Sara Cutler, Carol Emanuel. These sequences repeat throughout the song, resembling the lunar cycles. The song has 17/8 time signature. The lyrics to “Moon” deals with themes such as rebirth, start over and mythology, making reference to the Moon as “adrenalin pearls placed in the gods’ mouths”. About the song, Björk explained: “With each new moon we complete a cycle and are offered renewal —to take risks, to connect with other people, to love, to give. The symbolism of the moon as the realm of imagination, melancholy, and regeneration is expressed in the song”[1]

Nature

“Náttúra” is a song written and recorded by Icelandic singer Björk. The track was released as a single promoting the protection of the Icelandic environment.[1] All proceeds from the single will be donated to the Náttúra Foundation, the environmental preservation campaign after which the song is named.[2] The single was initially discovered by Björk’s French language fan website[3] and was later confirmed by the singer’s representatives. It was released on October 20, 2008[1] as an iTunes Exclusive, and had a wide digital release on October 27.[4] The song was given a physical release on April 20, 2009 with a white label vinyl released by One Little Indian’s web shop.[5] The single was included on the deluxe version of Björk’s 2011 album Biophilia.

Declare Independence

“Declare Independence” is a song written and recorded by Icelandic singer Björk. The track was released as the third single from her seventh full-length studio album, Volta. The single was released on January 1, 2008. Björk’s dedication of the song to various independence causes at live performances of the song in Shanghai and Tokyo have caused controversy.[3][4]

The song was originally an instrumental track by British musician and frequent musical collaborator Mark Bell, performed at his live shows as early as November, 2006.[5] Björk later added her vocals and brass arrangement on top.[6] The lyrics are dedicated to the Faroe Islands and Greenland,[7][8][9] islands which currently are constituent nations within the kingdom Denmark, as Björk’s home country of Iceland had been.

Declare Independence was originally meant to be released as the second single from Volta in August, 2007, but due to the worldwide success of the album Björk had to perform more international promotion work than her label One Little Indian had originally planned, meaning that the previously-planned video shoot for “Declare Independence” with Michel Gondry in London couldn’t take place.[10] The deadline for the music video contest for “Innocence” (then slated as the third single) was then brought forward a month to June 10, 2007 so as to provide a finished video able to coincide with a July, 2007 release originally planned for Declare Independence.

Innocence (Björk song)

“Innocence” is a song written and recorded by Icelandic singer Björk. The song was released as the second single from her seventh full-length studio album, Volta. It is co-produced by record producer Timbaland and his protégé Danja. The song was premiered on Björk’s MySpace profile on March 19, 2007 as part of the fan contest to submit ideas for the music video.[1] The single was released exclusively as a digital download on July 23, 2007.

The Dull Flame of Desire

“The Dull Flame of Desire” is a song recorded by Icelandic singer Björk featuring Anohni Hegarty from the band Antony and the Johnsons. The track was released as the fifth and final single from her seventh full-length studio album, Volta, on 29 September 2008.[1] Björk has performed the song 12 times on her global Volta Tour, often with Antony Hegarty onstage.[2] The lyrics to the song are an English translation of a Russian poem by Fyodor Tyutchev, as it appears in the Andrei Tarkovsky film, Stalker.

Wanderlust (Björk song)

“Wanderlust” is a song written and recorded by Icelandic singer Björk. The track was released digitally as the fourth single[1] from her seventh full-length studio album, Volta, on 7 April 2008.

White labels of the single were issued in February 2008.[2] The physical single was released on 12 June after an almost two-month delay.[3]

Björk has described “Wanderlust” as being the heart of Volta,[4] and has said that the song is about “the state of looking for something and almost knowing you’re never going to find it” and that it makes fun of her hunger for “something new”.[5] It was released in the UK on 30 June.[6]

As Björk said in an interview for Harp, “Things go in circles. Wanderlust, for example, is a sort of continuity of ‘Hyperballad’.”[7]

Earth Intruders

“Earth Intruders” is a song written and recorded by Icelandic singer Björk. The song was released as the first single from her 2007 full-length studio album, Volta.
The single was released digitally in the USA on 9 April and 21 April 2007 and in Europe on 28 April 2007.[2][3][4] The single was released in a physical box set on 4 February 2008. Due to high digital download sales, it remains Björk’s highest charting single in the United States to date.

Triumph of a Heart

“Triumph of a Heart” is the second single from Björk’s album Medúlla. The hip hop-influenced song features beatboxer Rahzel from The Roots, Gregory Purnhagen, and Japanese beatboxer, Dokaka.

The making of the video is documented in a bonus feature that appears on The Medúlla Videos DVD. The feature focuses on the auditions for the bar patrons who had to be able to make the noises and sound effects required for the song.

The single was released on 28 February 2005 in the UK, and peaked at number 31.

The song was first performed live on April 20, 2008 during the Volta Tour at the Hammersmith Apollo in London.

Oceania (song)

“Oceania” is a song recorded by Icelandic singer Björk for her sixth studio album Medúlla. It was written and produced by Björk, with additional writing by Sjón and production by Mark Bell. The song was written by the singer specially for the 2004 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony, after a request by the International Olympic Committee. “Oceania” was released as a promotional single on 13 August 2004, by One Little Indian Records. The song was written at the ocean’s point of view, from which the singer believes all life emerged, and details the human’s evolution, whilst accompanied by a choir. “Oceania” was generally well received by music critics, who believed it was the best track from Medúlla, although some thought it was not the best choice for a promotional release.

The accompanying music video for the song, directed by Lynn Fox, features Björk as “Mother Oceania”, whilst being jewel-encrusted in dark watery depths, with a colourful sunset and swirling floral creatures above her. A remix of the song, featuring additional lyrics and vocals by Kelis on her point of view of the continents, was featured as a B-side to the “Who Is It” single. A piano version also appeared on the DVD single, and was assisted in its creation by Nico Muhly. The song was premiered during Björk’s performance on the Summer Olympics ceremony, and was later included on the setlist of the Volta Tour (2007–08). At the 47th Grammy Awards in 2005, it was nominated in the category of Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. Cover versions of “Oceania” were done six times, while it was sampled once.

Who Is It (Björk song)

“Who Is It (Carry My Joy on the Left, Carry My Pain on the Right)” is a song recorded by Icelandic singer Björk for her 2004 studio album Medúlla. It was released as the first single from the album on 18 October 2004, by One Little Indian Records. The accompanying music video for the song was directed by Dawn Shadforth and shot outdoors in Björk’s native Iceland. The video features the bell choir version of the song, which was re-recorded with the Bústaðakirkja Bell Choir, and is different from the album version.

Where Is the Line

“Where Is the Line” is a song by Icelandic artist Björk, taken from the 2004 album Medúlla, written by the singer herself and co-produced with longtime collaborator Mark Bell. The track was originally intended to be released as the album’s third commercial single, but its release was cancelled just before Björk released the Drawing Restraint 9 soundtrack, in order to focus all promotional efforts on the film and soundtrack instead. Some promotional white labels vinyls were released around 2005.[1] A music video for the song was made by Icelandic Artist Gabríela Friðriksdóttir. Upon the cancellation of the single, the video was used as part of a video installation project by Friðriksdóttir.

The track is included on a compilation album released by Rough Trade, titled “The Record Shop – 30 Years Of Rough Trade Shops”. The track was chosen by Richard Russell.[2] A remix by Mike Patton of the band Fantômas (who contributed to the original album track) was made available for download on War Child Music in April 2005[3] and also appeared on a previous White label 12″, as the B-side to the Vitalic remix of Who Is It. Both remixes were suspected to be included with the commercial release of Where Is The Line.

It’s in Our Hands

“It’s in Our Hands” is a song by Icelandic recording artist and songwriter Björk, released as the first and only single from her first greatest hits album Greatest Hits (2002). Like her previous work, the song was written by her and co-produced by her along with Matmos. Musically, “It’s in Our Hands” is an electronic song that is influenced by glitch music, abstract sounds, ambient and synthpop. The song received critical acclaim from many music critics.

Pagan Poetry

“Pagan Poetry” is a song by Icelandic singer Björk, released in November 2001 as the second single from her fourth album, Vespertine.

The single peaked at number 38 in the UK and number 12 in Canada.

It was written and produced by Björk with additional production by Marius de Vries and mixed by Mark “Spike” Stent. The music box adaptation, featured in the song, was done by Jack Perron and the full version was later featured as a B-side song on the “Cocoon” single.

Cocoon (Björk song)

“Cocoon” is a song recorded by Icelandic singer Björk for her fourth studio album Vespertine (2001). It was written and produced by Björk and Thomas Knak, and released as the album’s third single on 11 March 2002, by One Little Indian Records. Inspired by her relationship with artist Matthew Barney, Björk set to make a record with a domestic mood. Working with Knak, she wrote “Cocoon”, a glitch song which is lyrically a song about a woman who describes making love with her lover during their post-coital hibernation, and includes frank sexual narrative related both explicitly and through over-sharing and metaphor.

Music critics received “Cocoon” with positive reviews, calling it one of the album’s best moments. The song fared moderately on music charts, peaking at number 35 on the UK Singles Chart, and reaching the top 10 only in Spain. The accompanying music video for “Cocoon” was directed by Eiko Ishioka and was shot in New York City. It premiered at Raindance Film Festival in October 2001, and was made available online through the singer’s official website in February 2002, closer to the song’s release as a single. It depicts Björk as a geisha whose makeup extends over her entire bleached nude body. The video was considerated innapropriate and was banned from prime-time MTV following her music video for “Pagan Poetry”. Björk promoted the song by performing on the Vespertine World Tour and several TV and radio shows.

Hidden Place

“Hidden Place” is a song by Icelandic recording artist Björk, taken from her 2001 album Vespertine. It was written and produced by Björk. “Hidden Place” was released as a lead single from Vespertine on August 3, 2001.

In 2000, while Björk worked on the film Dancer in the Dark, she also began producing her next album, writing new music and teaming with new collaborators; she has said “Selmasongs was the day job and Vespertine was the hobby”.[3] Her new relationship with artist Matthew Barney and the tension while filming Dancer in the Dark have been referred to as the two major forces that shaped what would become Vespertine.[4] As the process of filming demanded her to be extroverted, the new music she was creating became hushed and tranquil as a way to escape.[4] Björk commissioned Valgeir Sigurðsson to relocate some of his studio equipment from Iceland to Denmark, where Dancer in the Dark was being filmed.[4] While living in Copenhagen she also contacted the electronic musician Thomas Knak (aka Opiate), after having enjoyed his 1999 album Objects for an Ideal Home.[5] Björk’s musical taste shifted from the “clang and clatter” and “thumping techno that characterized Homogenic,[6] as she “was bored with big beats”.[3]
Björk then set to make a record with a domestic mood featuring “everyday moods and everyday noises translating into melodies and beats,”[6] hence its working title Domestika.[4] As she wanted to write her own songs in music boxes, Björk contacted a music box company, requesting see-through acrylic glass boxes because she wanted it to sound “as hard as possible, like it was frozen.”[7] She also began to use her laptop to write music, and decided to use instruments whose sound wouldn’t be compromised when downloaded from sites such as Napster.[8] Björk completed: “I had loads and loads of beats for ‘Hidden Place’ but it still wasn’t up enough. Matthew Herbert came for a visit in the studio and offered to do it. He ran away to his studio and came back after a few hours later with a DAT”.[9] She explains the song’s title:

‘Hidden Place’ is sort of about how two people can create a paradise just by uniting. You’ve got an emotional location that’s mutual. And it’s unbreakable. And obviously it’s make-believe. So, you could argue that it doesn’t exist because it’s invisible, but of course it does.[10]

I’ve Seen It All

“I’ve Seen It All” is a song by Icelandic singer Björk, with lyrics by Sjón and Lars von Trier. It was released as the first promotional single from the Dancer in the Dark soundtrack, Selmasongs. The song features vocals from Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Lyrically, it speaks of one coming to terms with the fact that they are going blind.[1]

The album version from the soundtrack album Selmasongs is a duet with Thom Yorke and Björk,[2] whilst the version performed in the film Dancer in the Dark is a duet with actor Peter Stormare and Björk.

All Is Full of Love

“All Is Full of Love” is a song by Icelandic musician Björk taken from her third studio album Homogenic. Written by Björk, the lyrics are inspired by the presence of love in the advent of spring and Norse mythology’s Ragnarök. The more popular version of the track, the original mix solely produced by Björk, was used in the music video but did not appear in the album. The album version is a remix by Howie B and has a minimalist approach and places emphasis on the singer’s vocals. The video features a combination of electronic beats and string instruments. A remix by the German IDM duo Funkstörung was released as a single in the summer of 1998. The song later received a full single release in 7 June 1999 to coincide with the release of its music video.

While some music critics declared that the song was one of the highlights of the Homogenic album, the single performed moderately on the UK Singles Chart, peaking at number 24. In the United States, it became a dance hit. The song and music video were released two years after the release of the album for artistic merit rather than promotional purposes. The song was included as the opening track in the compilation album Greatest Hits (2002), whose tracks were selected by fans through a survey. Some regard “All Is Full of Love” as the first DVD single release.

The accompanying music video for “All Is Full of Love” was directed by Chris Cunningham and depicts the assembling of a robot with Björk’s features and her passionately kissing another robot against an ethereal and sterile backdrop. The song’s video garnered acclaim from critics and is commonly regarded as one of the best music videos of all time and a milestone in computer animation. The subject of much analysis and scrutiny, it was on permanent display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City and has been included in various art exhibitions. Björk has performed “All Is Full of Love” in five of her tours, with the most recent being the Vulnicura Tour. It is one of Björk’s most idiosyncratic songs, and has been covered by various artists.

Pluto (song)

“Pluto” is a song by Icelandic musician Björk. The song was written and produced by Björk and British producer Mark Bell for Björk’s fourth studio album, Homogenic (1997).

The song is a collaborative effort between Björk and LFO’s Mark Bell, who was credited for the majority of the album’s production. Björk desired to have Mark Bell contribute to her albums Debut and Post, only finding him available for Homogenic.[1] Björk wrote the song in a Nord Lead synthesizer.[2] The final version was a result of Björk and Bell’s improvised jam sessions in Málaga, Spain, where the album was recorded.[3] Björk recalls:

“That was me and Mark having a laugh in Spain. It was a [hot] day like this. We got a little amp outside and a keyboard and I just did all these really punk things, just really thinking heavy metal. Most of the tracks I wrote before Mark started on them, so they’re more like song-songs, and then Mark would work on beats and arrangements with me afterwards.”[3]

The song’s title comes from the astrological concepts of Pluto, the sign ruler of Scorpio. Pluto is sometimes called “the Great Renewer”: it is the planet of rebirth and transformation that comes from experiences of destruction.[4] A Scorpio herself, Björk has said: “having a lot in the planet Pluto, which I do, means you want to cut the crap, throw all the rubbish away. No extra baggage. It’s death and birth.”[5]

On the 7th of May 2015, Björk linked to a video of a woman in a blue morphsuit twerking to the song on both her Twitter[6] and Facebook[7] accounts. In a week, the video had amassed 20,000+ views on YouTube. On her Facebook status, she claims that the video was shown to her by a friend. Soon after though, the video and the channel associated with it were taken down for reasons unknown.

Alarm Call

“Alarm Call” is a song recorded by Icelandic singer Björk for her third studio album Homogenic (1997). It was released as the fourth single from the album, peaking at number 33 in the UK.

The sped-up “radio version” of the song (which was also featured in the video) was used in the 1999 film The Mod Squad.

The song speaks of re-awakening through music and is rumoured to be about Michael Jackson as it was originally labelled “Jacko” on the Homogenic demo tape. Björk explained “I think that music has the power to change the things, and that’s what I wanted to show on Alarm Call”. It is the only single from Homogenic that was not included on Greatest Hits.

All Neon Like

“All Neon Like” is a song by Icelandic musician Björk. The song was written by Björk and produced by the singer and British producer Mark Bell for Björk’s fourth studio album, Homogenic (1997).

Snippets of the lyrics from “All Neon Like” were first released in the form of a poem entitled Techno Prayer, which Björk published in the July, 1996 edition of Details magazine.[2] It featured thematic ideas that she would later explore in her 2001 studio album Vespertine, such as cocooning and thread-weaving.[2][3] Björk confirmed the production and title of the track in an AOL chat interview in early 1997.[4]

The song’s production is a collaborative effort between Björk and LFO’s Mark Bell, who was credited for the majority of the album’s production. Björk had wanted Mark Bell to contribute to her albums Debut and Post, but he was only available for Homogenic.[5] Like the rest of the album, it was recorded at El Cortijo Studios in Málaga, Spain.[6][7]

Bachelorette (song)

“Bachelorette” is a song by Björk, released as the second single from her 1997 album Homogenic. Released on 8 December 1997, the song was originally written for a film by Bernardo Bertolucci, but the project was withdrawn. The lyrics for “Bachelorette” were written by Sjón, a friend and collaborator of the singer. The music video was noted for its surrealistic art direction, leading to a win at the 1998 MTV Video Music Awards.

Unravel

“Unravel” is the third song on the album Homogenic by Björk, which was released in 1997. The song features a prominent example of Björk’s use of a half-singing, half-speaking technique which, according to folklore specialist Njall Sigurason, is comparable to that of Old Icelandic choirmen.[1] Structurally, the song is made up of a slowly sweeping melody, saxophones, a church organ, and distant-sounding electronic beats.

Jóga

“Jóga” is a song by Björk, released as the first single from her 1997 album Homogenic.

An electronic song, “Jóga” fuses these elements with baroque and classical styles. The track’s sound was partially inspired by Icelandic music, containing what have been described as “volcanic beats”.[2] Lyrically, the piece is an ode to Björk’s native land and her best friend, while containing subtexts relating to emergency. “Jóga” has been critically acclaimed ever since its release, with reviewers praising her powerful vocal performance, as well as the track’s composition and overall production. Commercially, the song was a moderate success, charting in several international markets.

Hunter (Björk song)

“Hunter” is a song by Icelandic musician Björk from her 1997 album Homogenic. The lyrics of “Hunter” explore the pressure Björk felt to write music after realising the workforce that depended on her, following the success she found as a solo artist with her previous studio albums. The first time the song saw the light of day was at the 1997 Tibetan Freedom Concert and later with the online promotional release of Homogenic; the track was subsequently released as the third single for the album as three different CD releases in October 1998. A collaborative effort between Björk and Mark Bell, “Hunter” features a dark combination of strings and layered synths, a militaristic electronic beat, and enigmatic lyrics about the heading towards a mission.

Most commentators were enticed by “Hunter”, which they declared one of the highlights of the Homogenic album. The single performed poorly at the music charts, it peaked at number forty-four on the UK Singles Chart and number fifty-five on the French Singles Chart. The song was included in the compilation album Greatest Hits (2002), whose tracks were selected by fans through a survey.

The accompanying music video of “Hunter” was directed by longtime collaborator Paul White of Me Company and consists of a close-up of a bald Björk as she transforms into an “techno-bear” while singing. Seeking to convey the music’s fusion of organic and technological, the polar bear was animated in a non-naturalistic fashion; the bear also embodies the ferocious hunter the lyrics represent. The song’s video garnered acclaim from critics. Björk has performed “Hunter” on Later… with Jools Holland and in five of her tours, the most recent being the Vulnicura Tour.

I Miss You (Björk song)

“I Miss You” is a song by Björk, the sixth and final single release from her 1995 album Post. It is amongst her least-well performing singles in the UK, but it hit #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Dance Club Play.[2]

The B-side “Karvel”, was recorded in one of Björk’s first sessions with Graham Massey in 1991; on which two other tracks were also recorded: “Army of Me” and “The Modern Things”.

Possibly Maybe

“Possibly Maybe” is a song by Björk, released as the fifth single from her 1995 album Post. It is a song with deep electronic tones and soft beats that reflects on potential love.

There were three different single releases, this was the first Björk single to be released in three parts. Two of these three parts are rarities in the music world in that their A-side is not the first track. The first CD came with a slipcase that could also house the other two.

The song was covered at least 12 times by the other artists.

Hyperballad

“Hyperballad” (also known as “‘Hyper-Ballad”) is the fourth single from the studio album Post by Icelandic recording artist Björk. Like the rest of her songs, the song was written by Björk and co-produced by long-time collaborator Nellee Hooper. The recording sessions of Post and hence “Hyperballad” were set in Compass Point Studios, The Bahamas, to save tax money. “Hyperballad” infuses several music genres, such as classical, IDM, electronica and ambient music. The lyrical content discusses a dream that Björk experienced, in which she wakes early before her lover and throws small objects off a cliff, watching them smash. She imagines her body in their place, which makes her feel better about returning to her safe home and the arms of her lover.

“Hyperballad” was heavily lauded from contemporary music critics, who stated that it was the best song of Björk’s career. The song’s lyrical content, vocal performance and experimentation in its production and composition were also highly praised. The song was moderately successful in the countries it charted in, including Finland, Australia, United States, Sweden and the United Kingdom (where it was the last of three top-10 hits, after “Army of Me” and “It’s Oh So Quiet”). A music video was shot for the single, featuring a digitalized Björk running through a field.

Björk performed the song at the 1997 Tibetan Freedom Concert in New York, which was recorded by Sylvia Massy for Capitol Records. This live version was subsequently included on the second disc of the Tibetan Freedom Concert album released later that year.

Army of Me (Björk song)

“Army of Me” is a song by Icelandic recording artist Björk. It was released on April 21, 1995 by One Little Indian as the lead single from her 1995 solo album Post. The song was written and produced by Björk and Graham Massey, who helped her in producing and writing the majority of her third album. “Army of Me” was a commercial success, and the first single from Björk to enter in the top 10 of the UK Singles Chart. Lyrically, the song was inspired by the damaging behavior of Björk’s brother, and in the lyrics she tells him to stand up and to regain control of his life. The song was well received by music critics, who noted its darkness and praised Björk’s energy.

Björk premiered the song on some gigs during the Debut Tour before the release of the album. She performed it in a series of TV appearances, and notably, for the first time on Top of the Pops with Skunk Anansie. Additionally, the song was performed on every date of the Post Tour. The song was featured on Björk’s compilation album, Greatest Hits (2002).

The song’s music video was the product of another collaboration between Björk and Michel Gondry. It features Björk driving an enormous vehicle through a city, and includes Björk fighting with a gorilla for re-obtaining a diamond, and putting a bomb in a museum to free a boy.

In 2004, Björk, to help the UNICEF, released a charity benefit compilation entitled Army of Me: Remixes and Covers, which featured a series of covers and remix by artists from all over the world.

Play Dead (song)

“Play Dead” is a song by Icelandic singer Björk, and was released as the only single from the soundtrack of the 1993 crime drama The Young Americans. The song wasn’t included in the first edition of Debut but was later included as a bonus track, and the album was re-issued October 11, 1993.[1] The song was written by Jah Wobble, Björk featuring David Arnold, and was produced by Cannon, Arnold, receiving additional production and mixing by Tim Simenon.[2] The song, inspired by the main character of the film, was released in October 1993.

A mainly trip hop-influenced track, the song charted in the top 20 in the UK,[3] Ireland,[4] the Netherlands,[5] Norway[6] and Sweden.[7] An accompanying music video was released, featuring images from the film. “Play Dead” was included in Björk’s 2002 greatest hits album Greatest Hits.

Violently Happy

“Violently Happy” is a song by Icelandic singer Björk, released as the fifth and final single from her album Debut in 1994. The song was written by Björk and Nellee Hooper, who helped her in writing and producing most of the album. The lyrics speak of Björk feeling a love so intense that it is actually dangerous, requesting that her lover return to “calm her down”. Musically, it’s an upbeat song. “Violently Happy” peaked at #13 in the UK[2] and reached #4 on the US dance charts.[3]

The song was released in March 1994 and received positive reviews from music critics, which praised its musicality and its dance-pop appeal. The song received an accompanying music video which was shot by Jean-Baptiste Mondino, in which Björk and many guest appearances dance frantically in a kind of asylum while they’re cutting out their hair or parts of dolls. Björk performed the song live on TV a few times, including on Top of the Pops.

Big Time Sensuality

“Big Time Sensuality” is a song by Icelandic recording artist Björk, released as the fourth single from her 1993 album Debut (1993). Written by Björk and staple collaborator Nellee Hooper and produced by Hooper, “Big Time Sensuality” is a house-influenced song that helped boost Björk’s popularity worldwide, particularly the U.S., where she charted for the first time.

“Big Time Sensuality” lyrics deals with her relation with her friends and Hooper. The song features house grooves and electronic bass-sounds. The single release was actually the “Fluke Minimix”, which is a mix by Fluke, and the song was performed in this version in various occasions, including the inaugural MTV Europe Music Awards. Critics praised the song and the remix calling them “saucy” and commenting on their house and pop flavors.

A different edit of the Fluke remix was featured in the music video for the song, directed by Stéphane Sednaoui, in which Björk dances and sings on a truck throughout New York City. The video was praised by critics and fans and received heavy rotation on MTV channels.

The video edit of the Fluke remix was also featured in Björk’s Greatest Hits.

Venus as a Boy

“Venus as a Boy” is a song by Icelandic musician Björk. It was released as the second single from her 1993 album Debut. The song was written by Björk and was produced by Nellee Hooper, who produced the majority of her debut album. The single was released in August 1993, a month after the release of the album. The song was inspired by a boy who saw everything from a “beauty point of view”.[1]

“Venus as a Boy” features a musical ensemble made up of Indian instruments like tablas. The song received mixed reviews from critics, who discussed Björk’s musical shift. The song did not chart well in any nation but managed to enter the UK Singles Chart Top 30.

The accompanying music video was directed by the British music video director Sophie Muller. The clip shows Björk in a kitchen while she’s cooking some eggs and was inspired by the singer’s favorite book Story of the Eye. Björk performed the song on different TV appearances, including Top of the Pops, and sang it during the course of her Debut Tour.

The song was later chosen by fans to be included in her greatest hits album, Greatest Hits and also appeared in her Family Tree Box Set which contained a “greatest hits” disc on which the songs were chosen by Björk.

Cover versions of “Venus as a Boy” were done more than 30 times by other artists.

 

Human Behaviour

“Human Behaviour” is a song by Icelandic recording artist Björk from her album Debut (1993). The song was released in June 1993. The song was produced by Björk’s longtime collaborator Nellee Hooper. “Human Behaviour” is an alternative song with lyrics reflecting upon human nature and emotion from a non-human animal’s point of view. The song and music video were inspired by British broadcaster and naturalist David Attenborough.[1]

Critics praised “Human Behaviour” and deemed it a highlight of the album. The song was an underground smash, which peaked at number two on the dance charts[2] and reached number 36 in the UK Singles Chart.

The music video was directed by Michel Gondry and is the first time the two collaborated. The video, as the song, is a story about the relation between humans and animals, from the animal point of view.[1]

Scroll To Top